Publication - Research and analysis

Scottish COVID-19 Mental Health Tracker Study: Wave 2 Report

Published: 15 Feb 2021

Wave 2 findings (data collected from 17 July and 17 August 2020) indicate increased rates of suicidal thoughts, no significant changes in rates of depression or anxiety, and an improvement in most other indicators of mental health and wellbeing, compared to Wave 1 (data from 28 May to 21 June 2020)

69 page PDF

1.1 MB

69 page PDF

1.1 MB

Contents
Scottish COVID-19 Mental Health Tracker Study: Wave 2 Report
Annex 2. COVID-19 Contextual factors

69 page PDF

1.1 MB

Annex 2. COVID-19 Contextual factors

Effects of COVID-19

Respondents were asked:

  • How much does Covid-19 affect your life? (On a scale from No affect at all to Severely affects my life);
  • How much does COVID-19 affect you emotionally? e.g. does it make you angry, scared, upset or depressed? (On a scale from Not at all affected emotionally to Extremely affected emotionally)
  • The older age group (60+ years) reported that COVID-19 affected their life less severely and they were less emotionally affected compared to the younger age groups.
  • Women reported feeling that their life had been more severely affected by COVID-19 than men did, as well as reporting higher rates of emotional affect than men did.
  • Respondents in lower SEG reported being more emotionally affected by COVID-19 than respondents in the higher SEG. There were no differences in perceived impact on their lives.

Concerns about COVID-19

  • Respondents were asked: How concerned are you about COVID-19? (on a scale from Not concerned at all to Extremely concerned)
  • Older adults (60+ years) were most concerned about COVID-19 followed by the age group of 30-59 year olds. Young adults (18-29 year olds) were least concerned about COVID-19.
  • At Wave 2 respondents from lower SEGs were more concerned about COVID-19 than those from higher SEGs
  • Women were more concerned about COVID-19 than men.
  • Respondents with a pre-existing mental health condition were more concerned about COVID-19 than those with no mental health condition.

Understanding of COVID-19

  • Respondents were asked: How well do you feel you understand COVID-19? (On a scale from Don't understand at all to Understand very clearly)
  • Rates of reported understanding of COVID-19 increased with age, as older adults indicated higher scores than middle-aged adults, who, in turn, scored higher than younger adults.
  • Women reported higher rates of feeling they had clear understanding of COVID-19 than men did.
  • Most respondents indicated they were seeking information on COVID-19, 'less than once a day' (46.6%) or '1-5 times a day' (45.7%).

Control over COVID-19

  • Respondents were asked: How much control do you feel we have over COVID-19? (On a scale from Absolutely no control to Extreme amount of control)
  • At Wave 2 respondents from lower SEGs reported feeling that they had greater control over COVID-19 than those from higher SEGs
  • More older adults (60+ years) reported feeling that they had lower control over COVID-19 than did younger age groups.
  • More respondents with a pre-existing mental health condition reported feeling that they had lower control over COVID-19 than did those with no pre-existing mental health condition.
  • Respondents were also asked what they felt their chances of getting COVID-19 were compared to others of the same sex and age. Roughly half of respondents (54.5%) felt they had an 'average' chance of contracting COVID-19, just over a fifth felt they had a lower than average (21.0%) chance, and almost a fifth of respondents felt they had a greater than average chance (19.6%).

Willingness to contact GP for a non-COVID-19 related health concern

  • Respondents were asked: How willing would you be to contact your GP about a non-COVID-19 related health concern e.g. a new or changing symptom, if you felt you needed it right now? (On a scale from Not willing at all to Extremely willing)
  • The following groups were less likely to contact their GP about a non-COVID-19 related symptom than the sample average:
    • Young adults (aged 18-29 years);
    • Respondents from the lower SEG;
    • Respondents with a pre-existing mental health condition
    • Respondents without a pre-existing physical condition
  • Men and women were equally likely to contact their GP about a non-COVID-19 related symptom.
Table E: Views on activities
Item Positive (%) Negative (%) Neutral (%)
I can meet friends/family at pub/café/restaurant 31.5 25.7 32.9
I can return to work 19.8 12.2 18.8
I can visit friends/family at their home 59.3 8.1 27.3
I can see my partner 38.7 1.9 8.3
My children can receive childcare 13.2 2.2 9.1
I am getting more support from mental health services 9.6 7.5 17.4
I can get essentials such as groceries more easily 63.4 3.7 29.3
I am eating more healthy 39.2 10.2 43.9
I can exercise more easily 42.6 8.9 38.1
I can do activities like shopping, going to cinema more easily 52.2 11.5 30.6
Arguments/tension within home have reduced 18.8 5.7 28.0
I am getting more support from peer support groups, social care or other services 10.2 7.8 21.2
I feel in more control of my life and what I can/can't do 40.6 12.2 42.4

Contact

Email: socialresearch@gov.scot