Outputs and tools

The network will provide a long-term, quality controlled and centrally stored, dataset from which to assess the status of Scottish rivers and provide management advice.

The following leaflets provide an overview of the network and the ways in which the outputs can be used to inform policy and management of rivers:

The Scotland River Temperature Monitoring Network (SRTMN) (download PDF)

Where should we plant trees to protect rivers from high water temperatures? (download PDF)

Summer 2018 river temperatures (download PDF)

SRTMN R Shiny Application: This interactive R Shiny Application allows SRTMN data to be explored. A range of metrics can be mapped at national or catchment scales. Plots and underlying processed data can be exported.

Interactive mapping tools

Data and analysis from SRTMN has been used to produce a variety of river temperature descriptors, which can be used to support management decisions. For example, interactive maps of river temperature and climate sensitivity provide tools for river managers to plan and prioritise riparian planting when combined with the leaflets above.

Full details and description of the mapping tools can be found here, however in brief these layers include:

  1. SRTMN – Predictions of maximum daily river temperatures for the hottest day between July 2015 and June 2016.
  2. SRTMN – Predictions of maximum daily river temperatures for the hottest year in the last 20 years (2003).
  3. SRTMN – Predictions of the change in river temperature that would result from a 1°C increase in air temperature.
  4. SRTMN - Management priority on a scale of 1:9 where 1 is highest priority (i.e. high river temperature and high climate sensitivity) and 9 is lowest.

These layers have been made available in the following interactive formats:

Mapping layers available on NMPI

The National Marine Plan Interactive (NMPI) is an online interactive tool that allows you to browse spatial data layers, generate maps and save them as images. This is particularly useful if you want to make use of the numerous layers available on NMPI (including detailed background mapping) or if do not have access to your own GIS.

A list of the SRTMN layers available on NMPi can be found here.

You open layers of interest within NMPi by clicking on ‘Access this map on NMPi’ in the ‘Links and Resources’ table at the bottom of the page.

To select multiple layers within NMPi click on the ‘View Layers to Add/Remove’ button within the Layer Control box (first left hand box). Click on the + button to expand the layer grouping and click on the left hand boxes to select a layer (a green tick will appear). Note that all of the SRTMN layers can be found under Climate Change / Scotland River Temperature Monitoring Network (SRTMN). Further instructions on how to use NMPi can be found here.

Mapping layers available as a WMS

A ‘Web-based mapping service’ (WMS) allows you to load georeferenced images into your own GIS environment, via the internet. SRTMN layers have been made available as WMS layers so that different river temperature descriptors can be overlain with other spatial datasets and queried within the users own GIS.

A list of the SRTMN layers available as WMS layers can be found here. The ‘WMS’ icon on the left hand side of the ‘Download and links’ table, can be used to identify layers that are available as a WMS.

To add the WMS into your own GIS you would do on of the following:

For ArcGIS: Open to ‘Catalog Window’; expand ‘GIS Servers’ and double click ‘Add WMS Server’. Next copy and paste the WMS link for the layer of interest (found via the link above) into the ‘URL’ box. Click ‘Ok’. The WMS layers of interest can then be dragged into the ArcGIS table of contents.

For QGIS: Click ‘Layer’; ‘Add WMS/WMTS Layer’ and click ‘New’. Next copy and paste the WMS link for the layer of interest (found via the link above) into the ‘URL’ box. Click ‘Ok’. Click ‘Connect’. Select the ‘Image Encoding’ of your choice and click ‘Add’. The layer will now be added in your QGIS Canvas.

It is also possible to load WMS layers into R using either ‘ Leaflet’ and the ‘addWMSTilesor’ function or by running R alongside GRASS and using the ‘r.in.wms’ function