Publication - Advice and guidance

Potato exports guide

Information on the conditions and phytosanitary requirements for the export of Scottish potatoes, where known by country.

Potato exports guide
O to S

South Africa

Seed potatoes (updated 8 December 2020)

Export of seed potatoes to South Africa is prohibited except for microplants and Pre-basic TC minitubers.

Export is only allowed if an application for an import permit is approved.

Tuber tolerances

Nil tolerances for Pre-basic TC apply. 

Other requirements

Import permit: required.

Class: microplants and PB-TC only. 

Packaging: If wood packaging is used (e.g. boxes, pallets), this should be treated and certified. Wood material should comply with International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM 15) on wood packaging materials. 

Additional declarations to be inserted on the reverse of the phytosanitary certificate for seed potatoes

Additional declarations to be inserted on the reverse of the phytosanitary certificate for seed potatoes

For in vitro microplants

The following pests are not known to occur in Scotland:

  • Potato spindle tuber viroid
  • Potato black ringspot nepovirus
  • Andean potato mottle comovirus
  • Andean potato latent tymovirus
  • Potato T trichovirus
  • Tobacco ringspot nepovirus
  • Beet curly top hybrigeminivirus
  • Potato yellow vein virus
  • Potato deforming mosaic virus
  • Potato Stolbur MLO

The tubers from which the plants were derived, were indexed and found free from:

  • Dickeya solani
  • Pectobacterium wasabiae
  • Ralstonia solanacearum
  • Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. sepedonicus
  • Potato yellow dwarf nucleorhabdovirus
  • Potato A potyvirus
  • Potato leaf-roll luteovirus
  • Potato virus M carlavirus
  • Potato mop-top furovirus
  • Potato S carlavirus
  • Potato X potexvirus
  • Potato Y potyvirus (all three strains)
  • Potato yellowing alfamovirus
  • Tobacco rattle tobravirus
  • Tomato black ring nepovirus

The nuclear stock from which this material is derived were inspected during the growing season and found free from: Potato witches' broom phytoplasma. 

The plants were cultivated in medium free from antibiotic substances.

For PBTC minitubers

The following pests are not known to occur in Scotland:

  • Potato spindle tuber viroid
  • Potato black ringspot nepovirus
  • Andean potato latent tymovirus
  • Andean potato mottle comovirus
  • Potato deforming mosaic virus
  • Potato yellow vein virus
  • Beet curly top hybrigeminivirus
  • Potato T trichovirus
  • Tobacco ringspot nepovirus
  • Thecaphora solani
  • Phoma andigena
  • Colletotrichum capsici
  • Erwinia carotovora subsp. betavasculorum
  • Erwinia chrysanthemi pv paradisiaca

The parent plants were laboratory tested and found free from:

  • Dickeya Solani
  • Pectobacterium wasabiae
  • Tobacco rattle tobravirus
  • Tomato black ring nepovirus
  • Potato yellowing alfamovirus
  • Potato mop-top furovirus
  • Potato Stolbur MLO
  • Potato yellow dwarf nucleorhabdovirus
  • Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. Sepedonicus
  • Phytophthora erythroseptica var. erythroseptica
  • Ralstonia solanacearum
  • Synchytrium endobioticum

The following pest is not known to occur in Scotland:

  • Tecia solanivora (Belechiidae)

The parent plants were inspected and suspect symptoms tested and found free from:

  • Phytophthora infestans A2 mating type
  • Potato witches' broom phytoplasma

The tubers were produced in a medium free from soil and in insect tight facilities. 

The tubers were free from sprouts at time of inspection.

On arrival at the port of entry, the consignment will be inspected and up to 600 tubers sampled and tested for quarantine pests. Should any of the tubers test positive for the listed pests, the consignment will be destroyed or sent back and the area disinfected, on the cost of the importer. 

Importer shall be responsible for customs clearance and all expenses involved.