Collection

Child poverty statistics

Statistics and analysis relating to child poverty in Scotland.


Introduction

This page contains statistics and analysis related to child poverty.

Related statistics can be found here:

Latest statistics

The child poverty update shows progress against the targets in the Child Poverty (Scotland) Act 2017. The annual poverty statistics include the latest child poverty trends.

Additional statistics

Throughout the year, we publish additional analysis on an ad-hoc basis as required.

Local statistics

The main poverty data source, the Family Resources Survey, provides information at national level only.

The first alternative data source listed below is partially comparable to the national-level statistics in the Poverty and Income Inequality in Scotland annual publication.

The other alternative sources are not directly comparable with the official poverty estimates.

Children in low income families local statistics

These new experimental Official Statistics give the number (and proportion) of children living in low income families across Great Britain by local area. The term 'low income' here refers to being below the poverty threshold.

These new statistics complement the offical child poverty statistics. These local area statistics are calibrated to, and thus match, the 3-year average estimates for Scotland and the other nations and regions in Great Britain.

This is the first release of these statistics which have replaced DWP’s Children in out-of-work benefit households and HMRC’s Personal Tax Credits: Children in low income families local measure. The limitations of the former releases have been addressed and the new statistics provide a more coherent picture of children in low income families for both Relative and Absolute measures Before Housing Costs (BHC).

The release covers data for the financial years 2014/15 to 2018/19 and is available for a range of local areas including Local Authority, ward and data zone level:

Local child poverty dashboard of indicators

This dashboard provides a selection of data available at local authority level that can be used to monitor child poverty and its drivers locally. The indicators presented in this dashboard cannot measure child poverty directly in the same way as the indicators used for the national child poverty targets set out in the Child Poverty (Scotland) Act 2017. Data to inform the national targets are from the Family Resources Survey and Understanding Society, which can only provide statistics at Scotland level.

The content of this dashboard does not aim to provide a complete picture of the issue of child poverty locally. It offers an example of publicly available data that can help understand the local context for child poverty and its drivers. Other relevant information is available to local authorities and health boards through local sources, including research and operational information on service delivery.

Children in families with limited resources 2014-2017

These experimental statistics provide estimates of the proportion of children in families with limited resources by local authority area and household characteristics. The purpose of this limited resources local measure is to provide area breakdowns to inform local planning. The data is based on the Scottish Household Survey. 

The limited resources measure looks at children in families that have low income and cannot afford three or more out of a list of 22 basic necessities. Families are defined as being on a low income if the household income is below 70% of the Scottish median after housing costs.

The tables show estimates of the proportion of children who live in families with limited resources by local authority area, health board and household characteristics.

End Child Poverty local estimates

The Centre for Research in Social Policy at Loughborough University has developed estimates of local levels of child poverty for the End Child Poverty coalition since 2013. The most recent estimates using a revised methodology were published on May 2019 at local authority, parliamentary constituency and ward level across the UK.

Users should note that figures shown are synthetic modelled estimates, where survey data on income and household characteristics have been combined with data available at local area level. The estimates generated for a given area are therefore the expected levels of income, and do not represent direct counts of how many children are experiencing poverty in each area.

There is an inherent level of uncertainty associated with this methodological approach which is difficult to quantify, and figures for small areas may fluctuate markedly as a result of random variation. Therefore rates of change observed in specific locations need to be treated with some caution.

Small area income estimates

Please note that this publication contains poverty estimates, but no child poverty estimates.

The Scottish Government commissioned Heriot-Watt University in association with David Simmonds Consultancy to model local level household income estimates for 2014. The results of this work include the number of households in income bands along with a measure of relative poverty at a datazone level.

The estimates were primarily produced for housing affordability purposes. As such they are based on gross income. This is different from the usual measures of income and poverty which are based on net income.  This measure should therefore be considered an approximate estimate only, but may be of interest for local level poverty related analysis.

Child poverty strategy

The Child Poverty (Scotland) Act 2017 sets out targets to reduce the proportion of children in poverty by 2030. The following documents provide the analytical background for the Scottish Government's child poverty policies.

Progress report:

Delivery plan:

Background documents:

Previous publications

Measuring poverty

This document aims to explain the terminology, definitions and methodology used to calculate the official poverty and household income measures. It also includes information on uncertainty around the published estimates.