Publication - Advice and guidance

A Right to Speak Supporting Individuals who use Alternative and Augmentative Communication

Published: 12 Jun 2012
Part of:
Health and social care
ISBN:
9781780456553

Guidance to be used by people who use Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC), their familes, strategic and operational heads within health boards, local authority social work and education departments and the voluntary sector

A Right to Speak Supporting Individuals who use Alternative and Augmentative Communication
Appendix 6 Joint Principles for AAC Provision

Appendix 6 Joint Principles for AAC Provision

1. Services supporting people who use AAC provide a range of interventions including those that are universal, targeted and specific.

2. All children, young people and adults with communication difficulties are potential users of AAC.

3. All individuals with communication difficulties have an opportunity to access specialist AAC assessment.

4. National services are available to all potential AAC users if the need has been identified.

5. All individuals with communication difficulties have information on, and access to, a local quality pathway for AAC.

6. Local AAC pathways incorporate assessment, provision and support for AAC.

7. Local pathways are consistent with local waiting times and, where applicable, national guidance on maximum waiting times.

8. Individuals within the local AAC care pathway have a named AAC coordinator.

9. Individuals who use AAC can expect services to be centred on their needs and to be outcome focused.

10. Individuals who use AAC can expect services to be delivered by appropriate staff from an integrated, multi-agency team.

11. Services supporting people who require to use AAC use a range of national and local quality indicators to evaluate their service.


Contact

Email: Peter Kelly