Publication - Publication

Scottish Budget 2020-2021

Sets out our proposed spending and tax plans for 2020 to 2021, as presented to the Scottish Parliament.

283 page PDF

5.1 MB

283 page PDF

5.1 MB

Contents
Scottish Budget 2020-2021
Chapter 9: Justice

283 page PDF

5.1 MB

Chapter 9: Justice

Portfolio Responsibilities

The purpose of the Justice portfolio is to keep our communities safe and secure, and to administer justice in its various forms. The portfolio both tackles inequalities and ensures an environment where sustainable economic activity can prosper, enabling our communities to be safe and resilient, reducing crime and offending, supporting victims and witnesses and improving wellbeing and life chances. We remain focused on addressing gender inequality, including by tackling all forms of violence against women and girls.

The Justice portfolio has responsibility for the civil, criminal and administrative justice systems which include Scotland's prisons, courts, tribunals, the legal aid system and criminal justice social work services. It supports the police and fire and rescue services. The portfolio supports safe, secure and more resilient communities and works to build Scotland's resilience by improving Scotland's preparedness against a range of hazards and threats, including cyber‑attacks and terrorism, through multi‑agency planning, strengthening national work on risk and prevention, and working with partners to build and deliver capacity.

The Justice portfolio provides a range of vital public services in which powers are largely devolved to the Scottish Parliament. It also works closely with the UK Government and its agencies to ensure that Scotland and its communities are appropriately and proportionately protected from terrorism. It helps to create an inclusive and respectful society in which all people and communities live in safety and security, where individual and collective rights are supported, where disputes are resolved fairly and swiftly and where our responses are proportionate, effective and promote recovery.

Portfolio Priorities

The Justice portfolio plays a lead role in delivering our communities national outcome by protecting our communities so they are inclusive, empowered, resilient and safe. Scotland's justice system is underpinned by a set of fundamental principles which play a vital role in the national outcomes concerned with enforcement, protection and defence of human rights as well as underpinning economic confidence and sustainable economic growth.

'Justice in Scotland: Vision and Priorities', published in July 2017, was developed collaboratively with justice organisations and is a collective commitment to four outcomes and seven key priorities for the Justice portfolio.

Outcomes

  • We live in safe, cohesive and resilient communities.
  • Prevention and early intervention improve wellbeing and life chances.
  • Our system and interventions are proportionate, fair and effective.
  • We deliver person‑centred, modern and affordable public services.

Priorities

  • We will enable our communities to be safe and supportive, where individuals exercise their rights and responsibilities.
  • We will enable our people, economy and infrastructure to respond to major risk, recover from emergencies and adapt to emerging threats.
  • We will modernise civil and criminal law and the justice system to meet the needs of people in Scotland in the 21st century.
  • We will work with others to improve health and wellbeing in justice settings, focusing on mental health and substance use.
  • We will work to quickly identify offenders and ensure responses are proportionate, just, effective and promote rehabilitation.
  • We will improve the experience of victims and witnesses, minimising court attendance and supporting them to give best evidence.
  • We will use prison only where necessary to address offending or to protect public safety, focusing on recovery and reintegration.

Police priorities

We will continue to support a modern and effective police service to ensure the safety and security of Scotland's people and communities and that Scotland continues to benefit from a police service which fully supports its workforce and shapes its services around the needs of citizens and communities.

In 2020‑21 we will:

  • surpass our commitment to protect the revenue budget of the SPA in real terms;
  • continue to provide reform funding to support a range of transformation activities to help deliver the 10-year policing strategy, 'Serving A Changing Scotland';
  • support the delivery of a safe and secure COP26 summit, working with the UK Government to achieve full cost recovery;
  • provide dedicated capital funding to accelerate Police Scotland's commitment to greening its fleet, and to share the learning across Scotland's public sector;
  • provide funding to ensure Police Scotland can maintain and modernise its estate;
  • support a statutory public inquiry under the Inquiries Act 2005 into the circumstances leading up to and following the death of Sheku Bayoh;
  • support an independently‑chaired group to ensure that technology to make policing more effective is used proportionately and ethically;
  • commence the Scottish Biometrics Commissioner Bill to create a new Commissioner to oversee police use of biometric data; and
  • continue working with partners on the UK‑wide Emergency Services Mobile Communication Programme to deliver next‑generation telecommunications capability.

Fire priorities

Through the Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016, we are continuing to invest in the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) to ensure our communities are kept safe from current and emerging risks such as climate change. Through a renewed focus on prevention and collaboration we will support SFRS in delivering better outcomes to people and communities across Scotland.

In 2020‑21 we will:

  • enable SFRS to broaden its contribution to public sector outcomes through expanding its prevention activities to encompass a wider range of risks faced by elderly and vulnerable people in their homes; and
  • work with SFRS to deliver the full range of priorities set out in the Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016.

Victims and Witnesses priorities

We are committed to improving the experiences of victims and witnesses and support a range of measures to help individuals and communities feel empowered, resilient and safe and put the protection of victims' rights at the centre of our justice system.

In 2020‑21 we will:

  • support victims' organisations to provide information, advice and practical and emotional support to victims;
  • provide more victims with an opportunity to explain to the court the impact of crime on them;
  • progress our commitment to have restorative justice services widely available across Scotland from 2023;
  • commence the first stage of the roll-out of the legal requirement for child witnesses in the most serious criminal cases to have their evidence pre‑recorded in advance of the trial;
  • roll-out a statutory Appropriate Adult service across Scotland to provide communication support to vulnerable adults when they come into contact with the police; and
  • continue to provide compensation to victims of violent crime in Scotland.

The Children (Scotland) Bill which was introduced into the Scottish Parliament on 2 September 2019 includes provisions aimed at protecting vulnerable witnesses in Children's Hearings court cases and also in contact and residence disputes.

The Bill introduces:

  • a new special measure into the Vulnerable Witnesses (Scotland) Act 2004 prohibiting a party from personally conducting the remainder of their case in certain circumstances; and
  • a provision which gives the court the power to order a range of special measures if attending or participating in a Child Welfare Hearing which is likely to cause distress.

Violence Against Women and Girls priorities

The 'Equally Safe' strategy, first published in 2014 and updated in 2016, provides an overarching framework to prevent and eradicate all forms of violence against women and girls. This includes a range of measures, published in the 2017 Delivery Plan, to support the delivery of a Scottish justice system which is gender‑responsive, meets the needs of victims of gender-based violence and effectively holds to account men who carry out violence against women and girls and, where appropriate, supports positive behaviour change.

In 2020‑21 we will:

  • support a pilot to visually record police statements in rape and attempted rape cases to reduce secondary victimisation or traumatisation through the criminal justice process;
  • build capacity of key statutory services to identify gender impacts on the justice system and address it, including continuing to support agencies to understand the full spectrum of domestic abuse as defined within the Domestic Abuse (Scotland) Act 2018;
  • support collaborative initiatives to encourage women's full participation in the justice system, including overseeing the expansion of the Scottish Women's Rights Centre;
  • strengthen the criminal justice response to tackle men's behaviour by promoting the Safe and Together™ model and supporting integrated behaviour change programmes for men convicted of domestic abuse offences;
  • support the development of Barnahus Standards which will form a framework for health, justice and local authorities to understand what is required to improve our collective response to child victims; and
  • consult on approaches to challenge men's demand for prostitution and support work to reduce the harms associated with it and help women to exit - recognising that prostitution is a form of violence against women.

Safer Communities priorities

Building safer communities requires a partnership approach and the Scottish Government will continue to work with our emergency services and other key stakeholders to improve safety, including fire safety and promote prevention. We will continue to engage with our third sector partners to prevent unintentional harm and to reduce violence, anti‑social behaviour and sectarianism. We are clear that being safe and feeling safe is crucial to health and wellbeing in our communities.

In 2020‑21 we will:

  • support the Scottish Violence Reduction Unit; Medics Against Violence; No Knives, Better Lives; and the Navigators initiative, reducing the number of victims of violence, repeat victims, offenders and reoffenders;
  • support the implementation of our Fireworks Action Plan, to ensure that every community is able to enjoy fireworks without fear of their inappropriate use;
  • continue to support the work of the Police Investigations and Review Commissioner;
  • support Youth Volunteer Schemes, improving outcomes for these young people and their communities;
  • provide support for anti‑sectarian initiatives in our schools and communities, educating young people against the toxic bigotry of sectarianism; and
  • continue to support the Scottish Community Safety Network as it progresses on its journey to become a centre of excellence across the sector to support effective delivery of community safety outcomes at a local and national level.

Resilience priorities

Developing and maintaining resilience in Scotland requires a flexible and collaborative approach. We will continue to develop community resilience, building on themes of empowerment and preparedness through identifying trends and new risks, prevention, planning, response and recovery to ensure that the people of Scotland are able to cope both with potential disasters such as fire and flood as well as with the everyday challenges and risks faced by families in need.

We will collaborate with partners to ensure we can appropriately and proportionately tackle the threat posed by terrorism and climate change. We are implementing action plans to help strengthen the resilience of Scotland's public, private and third sectors against cyber‑attacks and are strengthening our support to citizens to operate safely and confidently in the digital world. We are also improving our ability to capitalise on the economic opportunities that an increasing focus on cyber security in the global economy will bring for Scotland.

In 2020‑21 we will:

  • refocus work, learning lessons from previous events, to ensure the development of vision, guidance, policy and training on resilience in Scotland recognises the rapidly changing risk environment and how that impacts on Scotland;
  • provide funding to support the development and implementation of action plans to help strengthen Scotland's approach to cyber resilience; and
  • engage with essential services operators to encourage them to further protect and enhance the critical infrastructure resilience of their assets, systems, networks and people.

Community Justice: Reducing Reoffending priorities

We continue to focus on prevention and rehabilitation, which has contributed to a 20‑year low in reconviction rates, helping to keep crime down and communities safe. Through working with Community Justice Scotland and other partners, including the third sector, we will continue to implement the national Community Justice Strategy to support the sustained delivery of national community justice outcomes.

The high prison population in Scotland, and strong evidence in favour of effective, appropriately resourced community‑based interventions, highlights the importance of a further shift to such approaches which prevent reoffending and reduce victimisation.

Overall, therefore, we will focus on increasing the use of community‑based interventions and reducing the use of imprisonment.

In 2020‑21 we will:

  • support robust and effective community disposals, such as community payback orders, alongside implementation of the extended presumption against short sentences;
  • support and promote the use of other community‑based interventions, including diversion from prosecution and structured deferred sentences;
  • expand electronic monitoring capability as the Management of Offenders Act is implemented;
  • continue to expand capacity around bail supervision, and alternatives to custodial sentences in the form of supervision, rehabilitation, and mentoring services;
  • support services to meet the specific needs of women offenders;
  • work with the Scottish Prison Service, justice and health partners, as well as other public services and the third sector, to continue to support the rehabilitation and reintegration of people leaving custody; and
  • continue to support Multi‑Agency Public Protection Arrangements to ensure the ongoing risk assessment and management of serious offenders in the community.

Scottish Prison Service priorities

While Scotland's prisons are recognised as being well run, we acknowledge that they face a number of significant challenges - in particular the consequences of a rapid increase in the prison population from 2018‑19. While compared with a decade ago, far fewer people now receive custodial sentences each year, those that do on average receive longer sentences and are increasingly complex to manage.

In 2020‑21 we will:

  • take forward the series of actions aimed at managing the current population and working to reduce the number of people in prison in the longer term;
  • continue to take forward work to modernise Scotland's prison estate to meet the changing needs of the prison population and to transform the lives of people in our care. This includes work towards the building of a replacement for HMP Barlinnie;
  • progress transformation of the female custodial estate to address the specific needs of female offenders, including the construction of a smaller national facility at HMP Cornton Vale and the development of two innovative community‑based custody units in Glasgow and Dundee before the end of 2021;
  • work with partners to support the Scottish Government's commitment to provide more effective health and social care services in our prisons, in order to address the widespread health inequalities of people in the justice system;
  • work with partners to enhance support for children affected by parental imprisonment; and
  • work with partner organisations to further develop through‑care services for those leaving prison.

Justice Reform priorities

We are committed to delivering person‑centred, modern and affordable justice services, modernising civil and criminal law and the justice system to meet the needs of people in Scotland in the 21st century.

In 2020‑21 we will:

  • ensure that those most in need are able to access publicly-funded legal assistance and also progress a range of projects to improve access to justice;
  • continue to work to ensure that there are opportunities to resolve disputes at the most appropriate level in the justice system, avoiding court where possible and progress work to reform criminal and civil procedure to keep pace with societal changes and international standards;
  • continue to work with justice partners to create opportunities for transformed criminal justice services designed around the needs of victims, witnesses and other users;
  • continue work to develop a contemporary, digital, platform‑based model for sharing evidence in the criminal justice system, delivering swifter and more effective services and enabling future reforms; and
  • continue to engage and consult on potential future reforms related to our criminal justice system such as the unique elements of the Scottish Jury System.

Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service priorities

Scotland's courts and tribunals, and the Office of the Public Guardian, play a crucial role in supporting a safe, just and resilient society. They are essential to our delivery of the values underpinning the National Performance Framework, that 'We are a society which treats all our people with kindness, dignity and compassion, respects the rule of law, and acts in an open and transparent way.'

We are committed to support the Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service to ensure its continual effectiveness in providing early access to independent redress, within a reasonable time.

In 2020‑21, we will:

  • explore new approaches to the management of summary criminal cases, using technology to improve access to justice, support quicker outcomes and minimise physical appearance in courts;
  • respond to the growing volume and complexity of serious organised crime and sexual offending, informed by the findings of the Victims' Taskforce and the Lord Justice Clerk's review of the management of sexual offence cases;
  • build on the significant progress made to better protect the interests of children and vulnerable witnesses, including greater use of pre‑recorded evidence captured at the right time, in high quality facilities - minimising the risk of causing further trauma;
  • continue to transform civil justice by developing end-to-end digital services and case management systems across a broader range of civil court business; and
  • support the important work of Scotland's devolved tribunals, as its range and volume continues to increase in areas as diverse as housing, mental health and social security.

Human Trafficking priorities

The 'Trafficking and Exploitation' strategy, first published in 2017, sets out the Scottish Government's collaborative approach and commitment to tackling human trafficking and exploitation. The Strategy provides a strong foundation of engagement and co‑operation. Through the statutory review of the Strategy we will adapt how it applies and is implemented, in light of changing circumstances, the experiences of victims and feedback from partners.

The Strategy also contributes towards Scotland's fulfilment of its obligations under the EU Directive on preventing and combatting trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims, and in meeting the requirements of the Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings.

The sustainable development goals that help inform this activity are:

  • eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation;
  • take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms; and
  • end abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against and torture of children.

We will continue to work with partners to implement Scotland's trafficking and exploitation strategy with the explicit vision of eliminating human trafficking and exploitation, through actions to identify victims and support them to recovery, identify perpetrators and disrupt their activity, and address the conditions that foster trafficking and exploitation.

Spending Plans

Table 9.01: Spending Plans (Level 2)

Level 2 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Community Justice 35.4 37.1 44.0
Judiciary 34.0 34.3 36.3
Criminal Injuries Compensation 17.5 15.5 15.5
Legal Aid 137.4 137.5 137.5
Safer and Stronger Communities 5.7 6.4 11.6
Police Central Government 90.3 66.8 57.0
Police and Fire Pensions 350.6 350.6 350.6
Prison Services 361.4 393.7 442.2
Miscellaneous 43.5 53.5 58.6
Scottish Police Authority 1,137.8 1,180.1 1,222.3
Scottish Fire and Rescue Service 321.6 327.2 333.3
Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service 117.7 116.6 122.6
Total Justice 2,652.9 2,719.3 2,831.5
of which: -
Total Fiscal Resource 2,410.0 2,442.0 2,537.8
of which Operating Costs* - 27.5 30.1
Non-cash 130.1 133.3 135.7
Capital 112.8 144.0 158.0
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

* Scottish Government operating costs have been presented in this way within portfolio budgets since 2019-20.

Presentational Adjustments for Scottish Parliament Approval

Level 2 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Legal Aid (NDPB Non-cash) (0.6) (0.6) (0.6)
SPA (NDPB Non-cash) (50.0) (50.0) (50.0)
SFRS (NDPB Non-cash) (24.7) (24.8) (24.8)
Police Loan Charges 5.4 3.6 3.8
Judicial Salaries (33.0) (33.3) (35.3)
PPP/PFI Adjustments 1.7 (-) 1.2
SCTS - shown separately (117.7) (116.6) (122.6)
Central Government Grants to Local Authorities 86.5 86.5 86.5
Total Justice 2,520.5 2,585.8 2,689.7
Total Limit on Income (accruing resources) 39.7

What the Community Justice budget does

This budget includes funding for criminal justice social work to support offenders who are serving community‑based sentences, electronic monitoring of offenders (e.g. through Restriction of Liberty Orders) and offender mentoring services. It supports the work of Community Justice Scotland, Scotland's national body for promoting the highest standards of community justice services across Scotland.

Table 9.02: Community Justice Services Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Offender Services 32.2 33.9 40.8
Miscellaneous 3.2 3.2 3.2
Total Community Justice 35.4 37.1 44.0
of which:
Fiscal Resource 35.4 37.0 44.0
Non-cash - 0.1 -
Capital - - -
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

What the Judiciary budget does

The Judiciary budget provides for the running costs of the Judicial Appointments Board for Scotland and the Court of the Lord Lyon, salary costs for the Lord Lyon, the Lyon Clerk, the Auditor of the Court of Session, as well as Commissioners and former Commissioners of the Scottish Land Court.

Table 9.03: Judiciary Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Judiciary 1.0 1.0 1.0
Judicial Salaries 33.0 33.3 35.3
Judiciary 34.0 34.3 36.3
of which:
Fiscal Resource 34.0 34.3 36.3
Non-cash - - -
Capital - - -
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

What the Criminal Injuries Compensation budget does

The UK‑wide Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme provides compensation to the blameless victims of crime and is administered by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (an executive agency of the Ministry of Justice).

Table 9.04: Criminal Injuries Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
CIC Scheme 14.8 12.8 13.8
Criminal Injuries Administration Costs 2.7 2.7 1.7
Total Criminal Injuries 17.5 15.5 15.5
of which:
Fiscal Resource 17.5 15.5 15.5
Non-cash - - -
Capital - - -
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

What the Legal Aid budget does

This budget pays for demand‑led legal aid provision in Scotland, administered by the Scottish Legal Aid Board. Publicly‑funded legal assistance: supports individuals to resolve disputes and problems in their lives, and avoid any or further court action; funds criminal defence and redress when rights are not being upheld; builds individual and community resilience and tackles inequalities by supporting locally‑based advice providers; ensures the rule of law is upheld and Scotland thrives as a rights‑based society. The budget also meets staffing, accommodation and a capital allocation, researching and analysing the operation of legal aid, the trends and the impact on the wider justice system.

Table 9.05: Legal Aid Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Legal Aid Administration 11.3 11.7 11.7
Legal Aid Fund 126.1 125.8 125.8
Total Legal Aid 137.4 137.5 137.5
of which:
Fiscal Resource 136.8 136.8 136.8
Non-cash 0.5 0.6 0.6
Capital 0.1 0.1 0.1
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

What the Safer and Stronger Communities budget does

This budget supports a range of initiatives to build safer communities, reduce violence, tackle sectarianism, promote fire safety, prevent crime and reduce unintentional harm. It also funds the Police Investigations and Review Commissioner.

Table 9.06: Safer and Stronger Communities Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Safer Communities 5.7 6.4 11.6
Total Safer and Stronger Communities 5.7 6.4 11.6
of which:
Fiscal Resource 5.7 6.4 11.6
Non-cash - - -
Capital - - -
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

What the Police Central Government budget does

The Police Central Government budget includes support for Airwave and the UK‑wide Emergency Services Mobile Communication Programme. It also supports the delivery of police transformational change and reform programmes, including the 10-year policing strategy: Serving a Changing Scotland.

Table 9.07: Police Central Government Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
National Police Funding and Reform 90.2 66.4 56.6
Police Support Services 0.1 0.4 0.4
Total Police Central Government 90.3 66.8 57.0
of which:
Fiscal Resource 76.0 59.7 49.9
Non-cash 2.2 2.5 2.5
Capital 12.1 4.6 4.6
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

What the Police and Fire Pensions budget does

This budget funds the pension costs of retired police and fire officers.

Table 9.08: Police and Fire Pensions Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Police Pensions 278.4 278.4 278.4
Fire Pensions 72.2 72.2 72.2
Total Police and Fire Pensions 350.6 350.6 350.6
of which:
Fiscal Resource 350.6 350.6 350.6
Non-cash - - -
Capital - - -
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

What the Scottish Prison Service budget does

The Scottish Prison Service (SPS) budget covers expenditure associated with operating the prison system (both publicly- and privately‑managed prisons) and the provision of a Court Custody and Prisoner Escorting Service on behalf of Scottish Courts, Police Scotland and the wider justice system. The SPS provides a wide range of services to care for and support those who are in custody, and their families, as well as operating a Victim Notification Scheme for registered victims of crime.

Table 9.09: Scottish Prison Service Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Scottish Prison Service 361.4 393.7 442.2
Total Scottish Prison Service 361.4 393.7 442.2
of which:
Fiscal Resource 312.2 312.2 342.2
Non-cash 33.0 34.0 32.2
Capital 16.2 47.5 67.8
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

What the Miscellaneous budget does

This budget covers a wide range of spending areas including the Scottish Law Commission, the Parole Board for Scotland and the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Prisons in Scotland, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Fire and Rescue in Scotland, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary in Scotland, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prosecutions in Scotland, Scottish Arbitration Centre, Scottish Mediation, and third sector organisations whose work supports the victims of crime and support for the justice contribution to tackling violence against women and girls. It also supports work to build Scotland's resilience, the armed forces and veterans community in Scotland.

Table 9.10: Miscellaneous Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Safe and Secure Scotland 8.3 12.0 12.3
Victim/Witness Support 17.9 18.0 18.7
Other Miscellaneous 17.3 23.5 27.6
Total Miscellaneous 43.5 53.5 58.6
of which:
Fiscal Resource 37.4 47.5 53.6
Non-cash 0.1 - -
Capital 6.0 6.0 5.0
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

What the Scottish Police Authority budget does

This budget is provided to the Scottish Police Authority to enable the delivery of an effective and efficient policing service to the people of Scotland, that reflects the needs of local communities. The capital budget will support the delivery of key components of the police capital plan.

Table 9.11: Scottish Police Authority Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Scottish Police Authority 1,137.8 1,180.1 1,222.3
Total Scottish Police Authority 1,137.8 1,180.1 1,222.3
of which:
Fiscal Resource 1,064.8 1,095.1 1,132.3
Non-cash 50.0 50.0 50.0
Capital 23.0 35.0 40.0
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

What the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service budget does

This budget funds the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) to work in partnership with other agencies, the public and private sectors and communities on fire safety, prevention, protection and emergency response to improve the safety and wellbeing of the people of Scotland. The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service priorities are contained within the SFRS Strategic and Annual Plans, which align with the Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016.

Table 9.12: Scottish Fire and Rescue Service Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Scottish Fire and Rescue Service 321.6 327.2 333.3
Total Scottish Fire and Rescue Service 321.6 327.2 333.3
of which:
Fiscal Resource 264.4 269.9 276.0
Non-cash 24.7 24.8 24.8
Capital 32.5 32.5 32.5
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

What the Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service budget does

The Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service (SCTS) provides the people, buildings and technology to support the judiciary, the courts, the tribunals and the Office of the Public Guardian. The SCTS is a non‑Ministerial department, chaired by the Lord President.

Table 9.13: Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service 117.7 116.6 122.6
Total Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service 117.7 116.6 122.6
of which:
Fiscal Resource 75.2 77.0 89.0
Non-cash 19.6 21.3 25.6
Capital 22.9 18.3 8.0
Financial Transactions - - -
UK Funded AME - - -

What the Central Government Grants to Local Authorities budget does

This ring‑fenced funding supports local authorities in providing Criminal Justice Social Work services across Scotland. These services include supervising those offenders aged 16 and over who have been subject to a community disposal from the courts; providing reports to courts to assist with sentencing decisions; and providing statutory supervision (throughcare) for certain offenders on release from prison. There are also special services for certain key groups of offenders.

Table 9.14: Central Government Grants to Local Authorities Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
2020-21
Budget
£m
Criminal Justice Social Work 86.5 86.5 86.5
Total Justice Central Government Grants to Local Authorities 86.5 86.5 86.5

Contribution To National Outcomes

This table summarises the portfolio's contributions to the Outcomes of the National Performance Framework.

Table 9.15: National Outcome

Community Justice

Primary National Outcome: Communities

Secondary National Outcomes: Children, Human Rights

The budget includes funding for criminal justice social work to support offenders who are serving community-based sentences, electronic monitoring of offenders (e.g. through Restriction of Liberty Orders) and offender mentoring services. It also supports the work of Community Justice Scotland, Scotland's national body for promoting the highest standards of community justice services across Scotland. In 2020-21 we are increasing our investment to further improve the effectiveness and capacity of community justice services, including diversion from prosecution and alternatives to custody. We will continue to support a shift away from ineffective short-term prison sentences, which do little to rehabilitate people or reduce reoffending, with a focus on stopping people entering the justice system and protecting the public.

Effective community justice helps prevent parental imprisonment which is an adverse childhood experience.

The Judiciary

Primary National Outcome: Human Rights

Secondary National Outcomes: Communities, Economy

An independent judiciary is integral to delivering against our national outcome on Human Rights. The judiciary serving within Scotland's courts and tribunals provide individuals with open and transparent access to justice which further supports our communities outcome. Furthermore, the independence and effectiveness of our judiciary supports Scotland as a place to do business, providing companies and individuals with assurance that disputes can be resolved cost effectively and quickly and supporting Scotland's position as a place to do business.

Criminal Injuries Compensation

Primary National Outcome: Communities

Secondary National Outcomes: Human Rights

This budget provides compensation to blameless victims of violent crime in Scotland or to people whose loved ones have died as a result of violent crime. Payments are made through the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme which is administered by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority.

This work supports our commitment to improving the experiences of victims and witnesses and support a range of measures to help individuals and communities feel empowered, resilient and safe, and to put the protection of victims' rights at the centre of our justice system.

Legal Aid

Primary National Outcome: Human Rights

Secondary National Outcomes: Communities

Reforms to the legal aid system in Scotland will improve access to justice, taking a user-focused approach to the provision of advice and legal services. This tackles inequality and builds individual and community resilience. The availability of legal aid supports access to justice, upholds the rule of law and the delivery of a rights-based society.

Safer and Stronger Communities

Primary National Outcome: Communities

Secondary National Outcomes: Health, Environment, Children and Young People

Through our work to reduce unintentional harm we can reduce health service admissions particularly among the under 5s and over 65s; and, our support for Navigators will reduce pressures on the health and justice systems. Our work on sectarianism and anti-social behaviour supports positive outcomes for children and young people. Introducing change to how we use fireworks can improve wellbeing in communities; and our approach to missing people will help those who are vulnerable and at risk. By supporting Medics Against Violence and initiatives like the Link Up programme, we can help those impacted by ACEs and trauma/adversity.

Our work on sectarianism and anti-social behaviour supports positive outcomes for children and young people - and by improving how safe we are, and we feel at home and in our communities, we can reduce isolation. Our work on missing people can improve the outcomes for people who are particularly vulnerable, including children and young people.

Scottish Police Authority Police Central Government

Primary National Outcome: Communities

Secondary National Outcomes: Economy, Human Rights, Environment

We are increasing investment in the Scottish Police Authority and Police Scotland to ensure our communities are served by a modern and effective police service. Police Scotland plays a vital role in defending some of our most fundamental human rights. They support our ability to live free from violence, crime and fear, and help create an environment within which other rights and freedoms can be enjoyed. Effective policing delivers a safe, just and resilient Scotland where people live in communities that feel safe and are safe, allowing individuals, families and businesses to thrive.

In collaboration with other emergency services, Police Scotland is investing in a fleet of electric and lower-emission vehicles and electric vehicles charging infrastructure to address the climate challenge.

Scottish Fire and Rescue Service

Primary National Outcome: Communities

Secondary National Outcomes: Health, Environment, Children and Young People

We are continuing to invest in the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) to ensure our communities are kept safe from current and emerging risks such as climate change. Through a renewed focus on prevention and collaboration we will support SFRS in delivering better outcomes to people and communities across Scotland. This includes SFRS expanding its prevention activities to encompass a wider range of risks faced by elderly and vulnerable people in their homes.

Police and Fire Pensions

Primary National Outcome: Communities

Secondary National Outcomes:

We continue to meet the costs of paying pensions to retired Police Officers and Firefighters.

Scottish Courts and Tribunal Service

Primary National Outcome: Human Rights

Secondary National Outcomes: Communities, Economy

The work of SCTS is integral to delivering against our national outcome on Human Rights ensuring we have efficient and strong independent courts and tribunals providing individuals with open and transparent access to justice which further supports our communities outcome. Furthermore, the independence and effectiveness of our judiciary and courts and tribunals system supports Scotland as a place to do business, providing companies and individuals with assurance that disputes can be resolved cost effectively and quickly and supporting Scotland's position as a place to do business.

Prison Services

Primary National Outcome: Communities

Secondary National Outcomes: Human Rights, Health

The funding covers expenditure associated with operating the prison system (both publicly and privately managed prisons) and the provision of a Custody Court and Prisoner Escorting Service on behalf of Scottish Courts, Police Scotland and the wider justice system.

In 2020-21 we will continue to invest in the prison infrastructure, to build capacity in the current estate, commit to future development, complete our new innovative female custodial units and meet the challenges created by significant prison number growth, from those longer term and entrenched offenders, with often challenging and multi-complex needs.

SPS continue to work with partners and on the basis of robust international evidence, to ensure that prisoners are treated fairly and have opportunity and support to be rehabilitated.

Miscellaneous

Primary National Outcome: Communities

Secondary National Outcomes: Human Rights

This budget covers a wide range of spending areas including the Scottish Law Commission, the Parole Board for Scotland and the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Prisons in Scotland, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Fire and Rescue in Scotland, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary in Scotland, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prosecutions in Scotland, Scottish Arbitration Centre, Scottish Mediation, and third sector organisations whose work supports the victims of crime and support for the justice contribution to tackling violence against women and girls. It also supports work to build Scotland's resilience, the armed forces and veterans community in Scotland.

Victims and Witnesses Priority

Primary National Outcome: Communities

Secondary National Outcomes: Human Rights

The policy measures supported by this funding are designed to put victims' rights at the centre of the justice system and improve the support, information and advice that is available to them.

These measures also aim to give victims a stronger voice in the justice process, helping individuals and communities feel more empowered, resilient and safe.

Violence Against Women and Girls Priority

Primary National Outcome: Human Rights

Secondary National Outcomes: Communities, Health, Children

The Scottish Government recognises violence against women as a fundamental violation of human rights; a cause and consequence of gender inequality and the attitudes that support it. The Equally Safe strategy is Scotland's strategy to take action on all forms of violence against women and girls. Equally Safe's vision is of a strong and flourishing Scotland where all individuals are equally safe and respected, and where women and girls live free from all forms of violence and abuse - and the attitudes that help perpetuate it. These policies ensure that gender inequality within the justice system is addressed, whilst maintaining the rights of the accused.

The Equally Safe strategy is Scotland's strategy to take action on all forms of violence against women and girls.

Human Trafficking Priority

Primary National Outcome: Communities

Secondary National Outcomes: Human Rights, Fair Work and Business, International

Our efforts to address human trafficking are strongly linked with other policy areas and strategies such as:

  • Serious and Organised Crime
  • Fair Work
  • Licensing
  • Violence Against Women and Girls
  • Procurement
  • Equalities
  • Homelessness
  • Health

No single agency can address human trafficking, a partnership approach is vital in order to ensure the most vulnerable adults and children in society are protected and that those responsible are held to account. Our work with both internal and external stakeholders and partners will ensure that we raise awareness of this crime, the devastating impact it has on our communities and how we can address the conditions that foster trafficking in order to meet the overall vision of eliminating this crime. We are reviewing our Human Trafficking and Exploitation Strategy to ensure it remains relevant and fit for purpose amidst emerging threats and in the face of increasing numbers of victims being identified.

Justice Reform Priority

Primary National Outcome: Communities

Secondary National Outcomes: Human Rights, Children

Our work with criminal justice partners to deliver collaborative transformation designed around user needs and leveraging digital enablers will ensure that the justice system continues its progress towards providing modern, high quality and accessible public service.

Two of the aims of the Children (Scotland) Bill are to ensure that the views of the child are heard in contact and residence cases and to ensure that the welfare of the child remains the primary consideration in these cases.

Resilience Priority

Primary National Outcome: Communities

Secondary National Outcomes: Economy, Environment

Working collaboratively across government and with key stakeholders to share current risk and threat analysis helps to ensure Scotland is prepared for sudden events. It can also help individuals, communities and business recover more quickly. Resilience activity helps to support Scotland's economy by ensuring key business is prepared for and can recover from unexpected events using strategic, senior leadership across Scotland. We also work with key stakeholders to ensure risks around climate change are identified, mitigated and understood at national and local level.


Contact

Email: BudgetandSustainabilitySupport@gov.scot