Coronavirus (COVID-19): impact on children, young people and families - evidence summary July 2020

Summary of Scottish and UK evidence on the impact of COVID-19 on the wellbeing of children and young people.


Footnotes

1. The parent sample of the follow-up survey were more likely have a primary school aged child (67%) or a child with a pre-existing mental health difficulties, and they were more likely to have reported more difficulties in the first survey than those parents that did not complete the second survey.

2. The presenting issues are registered against a service user following any interaction that displays this issue. This is typically during counselling, but could also be during any other interaction, such as comments in a forum. The comparison to last year is based on the proportion of the users that have presented with the particular issue, compared to the proportion last year, during the same time period.

3. E.g. https://www.gcph.co.uk/children_and_families/what_have_we_learned

4. The presenting issues are registered against a service user following any interaction that displays this issue. This is typically during counselling, but could also be during any other interaction, such as comments in a forum. The comparison to last year is based on the proportion of the users that have presented with the particular issue, compared to the proportion last year, during the same time period.

5. SG gathers data on the number of domestic abuse incidents that have been recorded by Police Scotland as part of its weekly COVID-19 Adult Public Protection weekly data report.

6. The Impact of Covid-19 on Wellbeing in Scotland

7. The findings cover responses received between 27 May - 2 June, at which time there was 2,007 responses from 29 local authority areas. The survey closes on 30 June.

8. See June Briefing for a description of this study.

9. This led to the "Reducing Stress in Schools" project which included 17 evidence-based interventions for reducing stress in schools e.g. calm down classroom d├ęcor and wall colours and 'play eat learn' schedules where children have recess before they eat lunch. Strategies to address the problem suggested by Liberty and Allan achieved a 27 per cent decrease in behavioural issues.

Contact

Email: socialresearch@gov.scot

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