Publication - Advice and guidance

Principles of Inclusive Communication: An information and self-assessment tool for public authorities

Published: 14 Sep 2011
Part of:
Communities and third sector
ISBN:
978178045345

Information and self-assessment tool for public authorities.

Principles of Inclusive Communication: An information and self-assessment tool for public authorities
The Equality Act 2010 and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Disabled People

The Equality Act 2010 and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Disabled People

The Equality Act 2010 (the Act) makes it unlawful for public authorities to discriminate against, harass or victimise employees and people who use services because of personal characteristics such as disability.

The Equality Act 2010 (the Act) makes it unlawful for public authorities to discriminate against, harass or victimise employees and people who use services because of personal characteristics such as disability.

The Act requires public authorities to make reasonable adjustments for disabled people to avoid disadvantage and is clear that reasonable adjustment includes provision of information in an accessible format.

Public authorities are also under a duty to promote equality.

Providing information in an accessible format and supporting people to communicate in a way that suits the person will help a public authority:

  • Meet its reasonable adjustment duties
  • Ensure that disabled people are not disadvantaged
  • Promote equality

View the Equality Act 2010 at http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/15/contents for further information.

You can download the Equality Act in Easy Read here: http://www.equalities.gov.uk/equality_act_2010.aspx

The Statutory Code of Practice on Services, Public Functions and Associations provides detailed information and guidance on reasonable adjustments.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Disabled People (the Convention) is a statement of the human rights of all disabled people and covers all areas of life. Governments must report on how they will promote, protect and monitor its implementation.

Inclusive communication supports many of the Convention articles, but Articles 9 and 21 are especially important as they require disabled people to have access to information and communication in different forms. These Articles set out disabled people's right to find out and give information and to say what they want, the same as everyone else.

View the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities at: www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=259

View in Easy Read at: www.equalityhumanrights.com/uploaded_files/publications/uncrpd_guide_easyread.Pdf