Publication - Progress report

Planning Scotland's Seas: 2013 - The Scottish Marine Protected Area Project – Developing the Evidence Base tor Impact Assessments and the Sustainability Appraisal Final Report

Published: 19 Aug 2013
Part of:
Marine and fisheries
ISBN:
9781782567578

This report provides Marine Scotland with evidence on economic and social effects to inform a Business and Regulatory Impact Assessment (BRIA) for each possible NC MPA, and a Sustainability Appraisal for the suite of proposals as a whole.

358 page PDF

3.8 MB

358 page PDF

3.8 MB

Contents
Planning Scotland's Seas: 2013 - The Scottish Marine Protected Area Project – Developing the Evidence Base tor Impact Assessments and the Sustainability Appraisal Final Report
Footnotes

358 page PDF

3.8 MB

Footnotes

1. http://archive.Defra.gov.uk/environment/policy/natural-environ/using/valuation/

2. In the context of this project, 'social impacts' are defined as distributional impacts - the impact of the sets of plan options on different groups. This will be UK-based but is expected to focus predominantly on Scotland. This includes impacts on specific locations (including individual settlements, where feasible within the scope of the project and data availability) and on specific groups within Scotland's population (including but not limited to different age groups, genders, minority groups, and parts of Scotland's income distribution).

3. Treating CFL and CFL(core) as a single site.

4. For the purposes of this study, 'Activities' are defined as being those that take place in marine waters, or on the immediate foreshore. For practical purposes, they should be consistent with activities examined in the Productive Seas sections of Charting Progress 2, Scotland's Marine Atlas, and in the Socio-Economic Baseline Review for Offshore Renewables in Scottish Waters. They should therefore include coastal and marine tourism.

5. http://www.bis.gov.uk/assets/biscore/better-regulation/docs/i/11-1112-impact-assessment-toolkit.doc

6. Some OSPAR/BAP features are already effectively afforded protection from activities with spatially-based licences; however, the following features are considered by the study team not to be given full protection: burrowed mud, inshore deep mud with burrowing heart urchins, offshore deep sea muds, offshore subtidal sands and gravels, shallow tide-swept coarse sands with burrowing bivalves and ocean quahog aggregations.

7. The term 'management measures' is used here to denote any additional actions that might be required of activities, including requirements for specific assessments, monitoring requirements and mitigation measures).

8. For information on the buffers applied to specific human activities, see relevant sections of Appendix C.

9. http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/+/http:/www.bis.gov.uk/policies/better-regulation/policy/scrutinising-new-regulations

10. Gross Value Added is an income measure and measures the contribution which each producer, industry or sector makes to the economy.

11. http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/marine/marine-environment/mpanetwork/engagement/270612/Stage5Examples

12. http://archive.Defra.gov.uk/environment/policy/natural-environ/using/valuation/index.htm

13. Estimated using GVA estimates for the industry and for Scotland presented in the Scottish Input-Output Tables (2007).

14. The others are: Energy (including renewables, Sustainable Tourism, Creative Industries (including digital), Life Sciences and Financial and Business Services). The Food and Drink sector includes agriculture and fisheries.

15. The Scottish Government has identified a number of Draft Plan Option areas for future offshore wind, wave and tidal development on which it will be undertaking a public consultation in summer 2013.

16. Identified from Seazone hydrospatial dataset.

17. All marine fish including shellfish (excludes salmon and trout).

18. Jasper Kentner, pers. comm..

19. http://archive.Defra.gov.uk/environment/policy/natural-environ/using/valuation/

20. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/gdp-deflators-at-market-prices-and-money-gdp-march-2013.

21. http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/press/news2012/number-of-households.html.

22. UK sea area is assumed to be 770,000 km 2 according to a report by the MEFEP (Making the European Fisheries Ecosystem Plan Operational), available online at: http://www.liv.ac.uk/media/livacuk/mefepo/pdf/NWW-ATLAS-FINAL_wc.pdf.

23. Scottish sea area is assumed to be 469,000 km 2 according to Scotland's Environment Web: http://www.environment.scotland.gov.uk/our_environment/water/scotlands_seas.aspx.

24. Sea areas considered in this adjustment do not include the extended continental shelf within which the HRB site is located. Given that there are no management measures proposed for this site, and no existing activities, the results of the adjustment made in this section are not considered sensitive to this exclusion.

25. The ranges presented in this table are the product of sensitivity analysis not statistical analysis.

26. The target, as set out in the Pre Consultation Draft Marine Plan (see here http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/03/21114728/14#a3 ) are as follows:

By 2020:

  • To increase the sustainable production of marine finfish at a rate of 4% per annum to achieve a 50% increase in current production.

27. Of the features currently on the OSPAR and UK BAP lists that occur in inshore areas, most are considered to already be adequately protected under OSPAR/UK BAP with the possible exception of ocean quahog and shallow tide-swept coarse sands with burrowing bivalves.

28. The target, as set out in the Pre Consultation Draft Marine Plan (see http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/03/21114728/14#a3) is to increase the sustainable production of shellfish, mussels especially, by at least 100% by 2020.

29. This was based on the relative proportion of shellfish farms to finfish farms within or adjacent to MPA proposals multiplied by the estimated number of finfish planning applications within MPA proposals (n=21; see Appendix B2) and assuming that this rate of development within proposed MPAs is sufficient to contribute to the achievement of the 2020 target.

30. Of the features currently on the OSPAR and UK BAP lists that occur in inshore areas, most are considered to already be adequately protected under OSPAR/UK BAP with the possible exception of ocean quahog and shallow tide-swept coarse sands with burrowing bivalves.

31. Defined in The Renewable Energy Zone (Designation of Area) (Scottish Ministers) Order 2005, ISBN 0110736176.

32. Some OSPAR/BAP features are already effectively afforded protection from activities with spatially-based licences; however, the following features are considered by the study team not to be given full protection: burrowed mud, inshore deep mud with burrowing heart urchins, offshore deep sea muds, offshore subtidal sands and gravels, shallow tide-swept coarse sands with burrowing bivalves and ocean quahog aggregations.

33. SEPA Coastal Flooding:
www.sepa.org.uk/flooding/be_flood_aware/types_of_flooding/coastal_ flooding.aspx

34. Some OSPAR/BAP features are already effectively afforded protection from activities with spatially-based licences; however, the following features are considered by the study team not to be given full protection: burrowed mud, inshore deep mud with burrowing heart urchins, offshore deep sea muds, offshore subtidal sands and gravels, shallow tide-swept coarse sands with burrowing bivalves and ocean quahog aggregations.

35. See Engineering Timelines:
http://www.engineering-timelines.com/scripts/engineeringItem.asp?id=988.

36. All data on electricity generation sourced from DECC via the Scottish Government Energy Statistics Database: ( http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Business/Energy/Database).

37. Scottish Renewables. Scotland's Renewable Energy Sector in Numbers. (http://www.scottishrenewables.com/scottish-renewable-energy-statistics-glance/)

38. Energy in Scotland: A Compendium of Scottish Energy Statistics and Information, Report produced Dec. 2010

39. Note that the Verso Economics figure is taken from a summary report; the full report does not appear to be publicly available. It is therefore not possible to identify the data from which the figure is extrapolated.

40. Scottish Government, Electricity Generation Statement 2012.

41. Note that the National Renewables Infrastructure Plan (NRIP) is intended to deal with this issue through focusing on several supply chain ports.

42. Some OSPAR/BAP features are already effectively afforded protection from activities with spatially-based licences; however, the following features are considered by the study team not to be given full protection: burrowed mud, inshore deep mud with burrowing heart urchins, offshore deep sea muds, offshore subtidal sands and gravels, shallow tide-swept coarse sands with burrowing bivalves and ocean quahog aggregations.

43. Defence Analytical Services and Advice website:
http://www.dasa.mod.uk/modintranet/UKDS/UKDS2011/c1/table105.php

44. DECC Oil and Gas website:
https://www.og.DECC.gov.uk/information/index.htm

45. https://www.gov.uk/oil-and-gas-decommissioning-of-offshore-installations-and-pipelines#table-of-approved-decommissioning-programmes

46. Some OSPAR/BAP features are already effectively afforded protection from activities with spatially-based licences; however, the following features are considered by the study team not to be given full protection: burrowed mud, inshore deep mud with burrowing heart urchins, offshore deep sea muds, offshore subtidal sands and gravels, shallow tide-swept coarse sands with burrowing bivalves and ocean quahog aggregations.

47. As listed on http://og.DECC.gov.uk/en/olgs/cms/data_maps/offshore_maps/offshore_maps.aspx [accessed 11 April 2013].

48. It is assumed that an arbitrary 10% increase in new pipeline length will be required to avoid moderately or highly sensitive MPA features during re-routeing. Having assumed the development will occur within the centre of the oil and gas award polygon, distances of new pipeline have been measured in a landward direction; this is assumed to be an overall shorter return length as opposed to an initial seaward direction to the edge of the feature extent or MPA boundary and then returning landwards.

49. Some OSPAR/BAP features are already effectively afforded protection from activities with spatially-based licences; however, the following features are considered by the study team not to be given full protection: burrowed mud, inshore deep mud with burrowing heart urchins, offshore deep sea muds, offshore subtidal sands and gravels, shallow tide-swept coarse sands with burrowing bivalves and ocean quahog aggregations.

50. Some OSPAR/BAP features are already effectively afforded protection from activities with spatially-based licences; however, the following features are considered by the study team not to be given full protection: burrowed mud, inshore deep mud with burrowing heart urchins, offshore deep sea muds, offshore subtidal sands and gravels, shallow tide-swept coarse sands with burrowing bivalves and ocean quahog aggregations.

51. The Border and Scotland ITV Regions comprise the Grampian, Scottish and Border ITV Regions. Grampian Television covers the North and North East of Scotland, Scottish Television covers Central Scotland and Border Television covers the Dumfries and Galloway region, part of the south west area of Ayrshire, the Scottish Borders but also parts of Northum BRIA and most of Cum BRIA in England.

52. Cited in the RYA Scotland's and the SBA's Offshore Wind SEA consultation responses. This value was based on a report by Scottish Enterprise (2006) (Mike Balmforth, SBA, pers. comm. 18 Jan 2011). This report estimated that the annual economic impact of the marine leisure industry in Scotland was £250 million, supporting around 7,000 jobs.

53. Some OSPAR/BAP features are already effectively afforded protection from activities with spatially-based licences; however, the following features are considered by the study team not to be given full protection: burrowed mud, inshore deep mud with burrowing heart urchins, offshore deep sea muds, offshore subtidal sands and gravels, shallow tide-swept coarse sands with burrowing bivalves and ocean quahog aggregations.

54. See VisitScotland Internet site ( http://www.visitscotland.com/). The definition of sport includes casual participation in physical recreations such as walking (2+ miles), dance, darts and snooker/billiards/pool as well as more organised sports.

55. Note that the figures are aggregated estimates for 2007-2009, thus they indicate the likely number of people participating in each activity over a three year time period.

56. It should be noted that figures for walking encompass both land-based and seaside tourism, though a separate category for Hill walking/Mountaineering, likely to be a more land-based activity, is not included in the walking analysis.

57. http://jncc.Defra.gov.uk/page-1445

58. Note that it is not clear how much of this figure can be allocated to marine and coastal tourism; this lack of information represents a data gap.

59. Natural landscapes and seascapes may also have value in terms of providing health and wellbeing benefits. However, these benefits are not considered here since they are very difficult to quantify and relate to the wider population rather than just to tourists.

60. See VisitScotland Internet site: ( http://www.visitscotland.org/).

61. Canoeing is a general term for a range of 'paddle sports' which includes sea kayaking, surf kayaking, sit-on-top kayaking and Canadian canoeing.

62. Some of these activities are carried out inland as well as at the coast. Table 44 in the BMF (2009) study indicates what proportion of each activity is actually carried out at the coast and this information was used to adjust overall totals.

63. The Scottish Sea Angling Conservation Network's (S SACN) Offshore Wind SEA consultation response, available on the Scottish Government website: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/11/03131226/0.

64. The authors highlighted that the jobs and incomes supported by sea angling in Scotland were estimated using a model of the Scottish economy and not by summing the totals for each region. Hence there was a slight difference between the Scottish totals and the sum of the regional values even though conceptually they should have been identical.


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