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Coronavirus (COVID-19): impact on wellbeing - survey findings

Findings from wave 4 of a telephone survey we commissioned to better understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on people in Scotland


4 Formal and informal support

Key findings:

The vast majority say they have provided some kind of support and / or help to others in the last month.

People are divided in how confident they currently feel about being able to access support from GPs, ambulances, and A&E in a timely manner.

Most people in Scotland (91%) report that they, or someone else in their household, have provided formal or informal support to others in the last month

Q In the last month, have you or anyone else in your household provided any of the following kinds of help to other people, outside your household?

Bar chart showing high levels of informal support given in the past month (at both wave 2 and wave 4), with 80% at wave 4 saying they had got in touch with others to check they were ok

Base: W2 (1,004), W4 (1,006), All respondents

A range of 'other' kinds of help mentioned included: practical support – e.g. fixing things, gardening, cooking, errands (5%); help with transportation to appointments / work/ shopping (5%); other mental/emotional support (3%); donating money / goods other than food (3%); providing help through work/formal volunteering role (2%), and help with childcare (2%).

Half (47%) feel confident that they could get a GP appointment within a reasonable timeframe, but half (51%) do not feel confident about this.

Q How confident, if at all, would you say you are that you could get a GP appointment within a reasonable timeframe, if you needed one?

Pie chart showing that 51% were not confident they could get a GP appointment in a reasonable time, with 47% confident

Base: 1,006 respondents age 16+ resident in Scotland; fieldwork = January 26 - February 11 2022

  • People from rural areas were more likely to feel confident (53% vs 45% of those in urban areas).
  • People in more deprived areas were more likely to say they were not very or not at all confident (58% of those in SIMD1, compared with 51% on average – although the pattern by deprivation was not linear).

Around half (54%) feel confident that, if they needed an ambulance, it would arrive quickly, but 39% do not feel confident about this

Q How confident, if at all, would you say you are that if you needed an ambulance, one would arrive quickly?

Pie chart showing that 39% were not confident that an ambulance would arrive quickly if they needed one (with 54% confident it would)

Base: 1,006 respondents age 16+ resident in Scotland; fieldwork = January 26 - February 11 2022

  • People in rural areas were more likely to feel confident (60% vs 52% in urban areas).
  • Those in more deprived areas were more likely to say they were not confident (43% of those in SIMD1 and 45% of those in SIMD4), as were unpaid carers (46%).

Around half (51%) feel confident that they would be able to access Accident and Emergency care if they needed it, while 43% do not feel confident about this

Q How confident, if at all, would you say you are that if you needed emergency care at an Accident and Emergency department, that you would be seen quickly?

Pie chart showing 43% were not confident they would be seen quickly at A&E if they needed it (with 51% confident)

Base: 1,006 respondents age 16+ resident in Scotland; fieldwork = January 26 - February 11 2022

  • People in the lowest income households (55% of those on under £15,600), disabled people (52%), and those aged 55-69 (50%) were all more likely than average to say they did not feel confident they would be seen quickly in A&E.

Base: 1,006 respondents age 16+ resident in Scotland; fieldwork = January 26 - February 11 2022

Thank you.

Stefania Pagani

Stefania.Pagani@ipsos.com

Rachel Ormston

Rachel.Ormston@ipsos.com

Contact

Email: covid-19.behaviours@gov.scot

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