Publication - Progress report

Climate Change Plan: monitoring reports - 2021 compendium

The first annual statutory monitoring report against the updated 2018 Climate Change Plan, as per the Climate Change (Emissions Reduction Targets) (Scotland) Act 2019.

Climate Change Plan: monitoring reports - 2021 compendium
Chapter 2: Buildings

Chapter 2: Buildings

Part A - Overview of sector

The 2018 annual emissions envelope published in the 2018 Climate Change Plan[3] for this sector was for 9.0 MtCO2e, whereas the outturn emission statistics for this year (published in June 2020) show a position of 9.4 MtCO2e. On the basis of comparing these figures, the sector was outside its envelope in 2018. However, it should be noted that the historical GHG inventory for the period 1990-2018 was subject to technical revisions since the time of development of the 2018 Plan, which places some limitations on the extent to which these figures can be directly compared.

The updated Plan sets out the following four policy outcomes for this sector, the indicators for which are summarised below:

The heat supply to our homes and non-domestic buildings is very substantially decarbonised, with high penetration rates of renewable and zero emissions heating. On Track Off Track Too Early to Say
% heat in buildings from low greenhouse gas emissions sources     x
% of buildings using low greenhouse gas emission heating systems     x
Our homes and buildings are highly energy efficient, with all buildings upgraded where it is appropriate to do so, and new buildings achieving ultra-high levels of fabric efficiency On Track Off Track Too Early to Say
Energy intensity of residential buildings (MWh per household)     x
Energy intensity of non-domestic buildings (GVA in the services sector per GWh)     x
% of homes with an EPC (EER, or equivalent) of at least C     x
% new homes built with a calculated space heating demand of not more than 20 kWh/m²/yrT     x
Our gas network supplies an increasing proportion of green gas (hydrogen and biomethane) and is made ready for a fully decarbonised gas future. On Track Off Track Too Early to Say
% of Scottish gas demand accounted for by biomethane and hydrogen blended into the gas network     x
The heat transition is fair, leaving no-one behind and stimulates employment opportunities as part of the green recovery On Track Off Track Too Early to Say
Percentage of households in fuel poverty     x

Just-Transition and Cross-Economy Impacts

We wish to understand and report on the broader just transition and cross-economy impacts of our emissions-reduction activities in addition to these sector specific policy outcomes and indicators. To do this, we use data from the Office of National Statistics: Low Carbon Renewable Energy Economy (LCREE) publication.

The LCREE is based on survey data of businesses which perform economic activities that deliver goods and services that are likely to help generate lower emissions of greenhouse gases, for example low carbon electricity, low emission vehicles and low carbon services.

The LCREE indicator is narrowly defined and, while useful within its limited scope, does not give us the full picture of the impacts on workforce, employers and communities and progress towards a just transition. Over the next few years we will work to develop a meaningful set of success outcomes and indicators which can improve our ability to track the impacts of our policies on a just transition to net zero and a wellbeing economy.

Sector commentary on progress

Heat in buildings currently accounts for approximately 20% of Scotland's greenhouse gas emissions. Emissions from heating buildings across Scotland must reach zero by 2045 with heat demand in buildings significantly reduced and poor energy efficiency removed as a driver of fuel poverty.

Our draft Heat in Buildings Strategy was published in February 2021 and sets out the near-term actions and vision for transforming our buildings and the systems that supply their heat, ensuring all buildings reach zero emissions by 2045. The consultation on the draft Heat in Buildings Strategy seeks views on a new heat target, which will be confirmed in the final Strategy.

As detailed in the following section, the CCPu introduced five new indicators to track progress in the Buildings sector, whilst three indicators were carried over from the previous Plan which have seen some progress since the 2019 monitoring report. Specifically, from 2015 to 2018, energy intensity fell by just 1.3%, despite a 0.6% increase in domestic energy consumption. No update is available at this stage on the energy intensity of non-domestic buildings for 2018 as data is still being compiled. Last but not least, 45% of Scottish homes were rated as EPC band C or better under SAP 2012 (RdSAP v 9.93) in 2019 similar to 2018.

Developments in monitoring arrangements since CCPu / last report

Following our commitment to net zero by 2045, in the update to the Climate Change Plan we presented four revised policy outcomes. Five new indicators have been introduced to reflect the changes to the outcomes, alongside three indicators brought forward from our previous monitoring report. The monitoring framework for the sector now aims to capture and track:

1. The percentage of heat in buildings from low greenhouse gas emissions sources.

2. The percentage of buildings using low greenhouse gas emission heating systems.

3. The energy intensity of residential buildings (carried over from previous monitoring report).

4. The energy intensity of non-domestic buildings (carried over from previous monitoring report).

5. The percentage of homes with an EPC (EER, or equivalent) of at least C (carried over from previous monitoring report).

6. The proportion of new homes built with a calculated space heating demand of not more than 20 kWh/m2/yr.

7. The proportion of Scottish gas demand accounted for by biomethane and hydrogen blended into the gas network.

8. The percentage of households in fuel poverty.

Part B - Progress to Policy Outcome Indicators

Policy Outcome: Cross-sectoral social and economic indicator

Indicator: FTE employment in Low Carbon Renewable Energy Economy

On-Track Assessment (Milestones/ Targets): Year-to-year change

Most recent data: 2018

Data source(s): Office of National Statistics: Low Carbon Renewable Energy Economy (LCREE)

Assessment: Too early to say[4]

Commentary:

  • In 2018, Scottish low carbon and renewable energy (LCREE) sector was estimated to directly provide 23,100 full time equivalent (FTE) jobs
  • The LCREE estimates are based on a relatively small sample of businesses and hence are subject to fairly wide confidence intervals. LCREE employment in Scotland in 2018 is similar to previous years and not statistically significantly different to 2017.
Buildings graph 1: Employment in Low Carbon renewable Energy Economy, FTE
Graph showing employment in low carbon renewable energy economy from years 2014-2018. The graph shows the amount stayed about level from 2014 to 2015 at around 23,000, increased to around 24,000 in 2016, decreased to about 22,000 in 2017, and increased back to about 23,000 in 2018. None of these changes has been statistically significant. This graph is duplicated across all eight sectors.

Source: ONS

Policy Outcome: 1

Indicator: % heat in buildings from low greenhouse gas emissions sources

On-Track Assessment (Milestones/ Targets): Progress to target [TBC in 2021]

Most recent data:

Data source(s): Data is under development

Assessment: Too early to say[5]

Commentary: Discussions with contractors are ongoing to take forward work and develop data that can be used to monitor this in future.

Policy Outcome: 1

Indicator: % of buildings using low greenhouse gas emission heating systems

On-Track Assessment (Milestones/ Targets): Year-to-year change

Most recent data:

Data source(s): Data feeding into this will come from:

  • Ordnance Survey;
  • Scottish EPC register;
  • Scottish assessors (non-domestic register);
  • BEIS (meter point data);
  • Xoserve (off gas grid data);
  • Scottish Gas Network (meter point connection);
  • Home analytics; and
  • Geomni UK buildings model.

Assessment: Too early to say[6]

Commentary: Data is still being compiled by EST and is not yet ready for further distribution.

Policy Outcome: 2

Indicator: Energy intensity of residential buildings (MWh per household)

On-Track Assessment (Milestones/ Targets): Progress to target [to fall by at least 30% by 2032][7]

Most recent data: 2018

Data source(s): Scottish Statistics Energy Hub

Assessment: Too early to say[8]

Commentary: The Climate Change Plan update sets ambitions in the residential sector for energy and emissions intensities to fall by 30% from 2015 levels. Energy intensity is the average energy use per household in Scotland. Emissions intensity is average emissions per household.

From 2005, energy intensity fell by 25.2% to 17.6 MWh in 2018, and this is due to a 18.5% decrease in energy consumption in part due to improved energy efficiency measures, while the number of households increased by 8.9%. From 2015 to 2018, energy intensity fell by just 1.3%, despite a 0.6% increase in domestic energy consumption.

Between 2015 and 2018 emissions intensity in the residential sector increased by just 0.1% to 2.52 tons of carbon dioxide per household a year. This stems from a 2.0% increase in domestic emissions and a 1.9% increase in the number of households.

Buildings graph 2: Average household energy intensity (kWh/houesholds) Scotland, 2005 - 2018
Graph showing average household energy intensity (kilowatt hour by household) from 2005 to 2018. The graph displays a decline from 23,508 in 2005 to 17,585 in 2018.

Source: BEIS, SG

Policy Outcome: 2

Indicator: Energy intensity of non-domestic buildings (GVA in the services sector per GWh)

On-Track Assessment (Milestones/ Targets): Year-to-year change

Most recent data:

Data source(s): Data feeding into this will come from:

  • Ordnance Survey;
  • Scottish EPC register;
  • Scottish assessors (non-domestic register);
  • BEIS (meter point data);
  • Xoserve (off gas grid data);
  • Scottish Gas Network (meter point connection);
  • Home analytics; and
  • Geomni UK buildings model.

Assessment: Too early to say[9]

Commentary: Data is still being compiled by EST and is not yet ready for further distribution.

Policy Outcome: 2

Indicator: % of homes with an EPC (EER, or equivalent) of at least C

On-Track Assessment (Milestones/ Targets): Progress to 2035 target [all homes to have EPC C or higher where technically feasible and cost effective]

Most recent data: 45% of Scottish homes rated as EPC band C or better under SAP 2012 (RdSAP v 9.93) in 2019 similar to 2018.

Data source(s): Scottish House Condition Survey (SHCS) 2019. Energy efficiency ratings are calculated under different versions of Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP), the SAP 2009 methodology and the most recent SAP 2012 methodology applying two different versions of RdSAP. Using SAP 2009 enables us to examine the longer term trend in the energy efficiency of the housing stock since 2010. SAP 2012 (RdSAP v9.93) was first used in reporting data from the SHCS in the 2018 Key Findings Report and therefore only 2 years of data are available. For this reason SAP 2012 (RdSAP v9.92) is also included with data from 2014.

Assessment: Too early to say[10]

Commentary: Grouped EPC Bands under SAP 2009, SAP 2012 (RdSAP v9.92) and SAP 2012 (RdSAP v 9.93), 2010 to 2019

Buildings graph 3
Grouped EPC Bands under SAP 2009, SAP 2012 (RdSAP v9.92) and SAP 2012 (RdSAP v 9.93), 2010 to 2019. The figure shows a strong trend of improvement in the energy efficiency profile of the housing stock since 2010. The proportion of dwellings rated C or better increased from 24% in 2010 to 51% in 2019 (SAP 2009), and 35% in 2014 to 47% in 2019 (SAP 2012, RdSAP v 9.92).

The figure shows a strong trend of improvement in the energy efficiency profile of the housing stock since 2010. The proportion of dwellings rated C or better increased from 24% in 2010 to 51% in 2019 (SAP 2009), and 35% in 2014 to 47% in 2019 (SAP 2012, RdSAP v 9.92).

An improvement in the energy efficiency profile of the domestic building stock will contribute to reducing energy intensity and emissions intensity in the residential sector.

Policy Outcome: 2

Indicator: % new homes built with a calculated space heating demand of not more than 20 kWh/m²/yrT

On-Track Assessment (Milestones/ Targets): Year-to-year change

Most recent data: Analysis of newbuild homes completions for 2019

Data source(s): EPC data for Q1 to Q4 2019 lodged to the Scottish Energy Performance Certificate Register (23,638 records)

Assessment: Too early to say[11]

Commentary: Without applying any moderation to remove potentially erroneous values, 1,513 records reported heat demand of 20 kWh/m²/year or less. This is 6.4% of completions for 2019.

Adjusting the stock to account for any potentially erroneous values: Removing the 0.5% of the stock with both the lowest and highest space heating demand /m²/year in effect removes all but one of the records with a space heating demand m²/year <10kWh, and removes all records with a SH demand m²/year >120 kWh. This leaves 1,394 records (5.96%) of the stock with space heating demand m²/year < 20 kWh / m2.

The reported percentage is for the latest full year analysis available at this time (February 2021) and is the first value reported since setting the indicator. No trend can therefore be reported. Future monitoring should use 6% as the baseline when analysing the trend in the share of properties built with space heating demand < 20 kWh /m²/year.

Policy Outcome: 3

Indicator: % of Scottish gas demand accounted for by biomethane and hydrogen blended into the gas network

On-Track Assessment (Milestones/ Targets): Year-to-year change

Most recent data: 2019

Data source(s): Scottish Gas Network (unpublished data) and BEIS (Regional and local authority gas consumption statistics)

Assessment: Too early to say[12]

Commentary: In 2019, 1.5% of gas demand was accounted for by biomethane gas. This is an increase of 1.2 percentage points compared to 2015.

UK wide legislation currently prevents the injection of hydrogen gas into the system. This is to be looked at in Westminster when the parliamentary time table allows.

Policy Outcome: 4

Indicator: Percentage of households in fuel poverty

On-Track Assessment (Milestones/ Targets): Progress to 2040 target [no more than 5%] interim 2030 [no more than 15%] 2035 [no more than 10%] targets[13]

Most recent data: 24.6% of households were estimated to be living in fuel poverty in 2019.

Data source(s): Scottish House Condition Survey 2019

Assessment: Too early to say[14]

Commentary: Estimates of Fuel Poverty and Extreme Fuel Poverty since 2012

Buildings graph 4
Graph showing estimates of fuel poverty and extreme fuel poverty since 2012. The graph shows an overall reduction in both; from 29% all fuel poverty and 15.1% extreme fuel poor in 2012 to 24.6% all fuel poor and 12.4% extreme fuel poor in 2019. The graph also showed that both peaked in 2013, and that the fuel price index has increased from 2012 to 2019.

Note: Energy requirement underpinning fuel poverty estimate modelled on the following basis: 2012-2013: BREDEM 2012 v 1.0: from 2024 onwards: BREDEM 2012 v 1.1 and New Prices to the adjustment of fuel price sources from 2013. From 2016 an improvement is included by assigning pre-payment metered fuel prices to the relevant households. From 2019 further improvements are included by using more detailed information on combi boilers to improve the accuracy of calculations surrounding hot water losses and assigning an off-peak tariff to relevant household’s lights and appliances fuel prices.

In 2019, an estimated 24.6% of all households were in fuel poverty, similar to 2018 but lower than that recorded in the survey between 2012 and 2015. Since 2016 the rate of fuel poverty has remained between 23% and 26%.

Around 12.4% were living in extreme fuel poverty, similar to 2018 but a decrease from 16% in 2013. Since 2015, the rate of extreme fuel poverty has remained between 11% and 13%.

In 2019, the median fuel poverty gap (adjusted for 2015 prices) for fuel poor households was £700. This is higher than the median fuel poverty gap (adjusted for 2015 prices) in 2018 (£610) but similar to the median gap in 2012 to 2017.

The Fuel Poverty (Targets, Definition and Strategy) (Scotland) Act 2019 received Royal Assent in July 2019 and it is therefore too early to say whether progress towards its targets are on track. The Fuel Poverty Strategy required by the Act will be published later in 2021, and will set out how the targets will be achieved.

Part C - Information on implementation of individual policies

Outcome 1: The heat supply to our homes and non-domestic buildings is very substantially decarbonised, with high penetration rates of renewable and zero emissions heating

Outcome 2: Our homes and buildings are highly energy efficient, with all buildings upgraded where it is appropriate to do so, and new buildings achieving ultra-high levels of fabric efficiency

Policy:

Energy Company Obligation (ECO) requires obligated energy supply companies to deliver energy efficiency measures in homes – mainly insulation-based measures and boiler replacements.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Maintained

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

ECO provides finance for energy efficiency improvements benefitting fuel poor households but offers limited funding for zero carbon heating measures.

The Secretary of State (BEIS) retains an absolute veto over how these schemes are designed, operate and are financed through the energy levies in Scotland. Scottish Ministers have expressed their view that this is not an acceptable basis upon which to set regulations for a Scottish scheme.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

Since 2013, approximately 13.3% of all households receiving ECO measures have been delivered in Scotland (to around 12% of all households in Scotland).

Timeframe and expected next steps:

The current ECO scheme is set to conclude in March 2022. Scottish Ministers are seeking the agreement of the UK Government to replace the existing ECO and Warm Home Discount schemes with a single, flexible Fuel Poverty scheme in Scotland.

Policy:

Energy Efficient Scotland Delivery Schemes:

  • Area Based Schemes and Warmer Homes Scotland.
  • Home Energy Scotland Advice Service and Loans.
  • Home Energy Scotland cashback scheme for zero emissions heating technologies and energy efficiency measures - boosted.
  • SME Advice Service and Loans.
  • SME cashback scheme for zero emissions heating technologies and energy efficiency measures - boosted.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [2020-2021 PfG]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Area Based Schemes now provide increased funding for whole house retrofits, zero/ low carbon heating and microgeneration.

Through Warmer Homes Scotland (WHS) we have made available renewable and micro generation heat measures and new insulation measures. Grant funding has also been increased to incentivise uptake on more expensive low carbon & renewable measures.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

ABS has delivered over 100,000 energy efficiency improvements since 2013.

WHS has been operating since Sept 2015 helping more than 20,000 households throughout Scotland.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Scottish Ministers have expressed their intention to provide multi-year resource assumptions for ABS. Guidance for 21-22 schemes is being drafted and officials hope that this will be incorporated for ABS 10 (22-23) onwards.

Policy:

Review support programmes: We will review existing Scottish Government funding schemes to ensure that they support the deployment of low and zero emissions heat. We will expand the provision of loans to the SME sector, and enhance the wider energy efficiency and heat advice service and provision of tailored start-to-end support.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [2020-2021 PfG]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Work on this is underway. Provision to the SME sector has been expanded

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

-

Policy:

Procure a new national delivery scheme, to replace the existing Warmer Homes Scotland contract, to open in 2022.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Work on this is underway.

No further update is available at the moment.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

-

Policy:

Energy Efficiency Standard for Social Housing: will be met by social landlords by 2020.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP

[date announced]:

Maintained

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

We expect that Covid-19 will affect some further projects that landlords planned to carry out to meet the first milestone during 2020

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

The SHR reported that 87% of social rented homes were already meeting the 2020 milestone as of the end of March 2020, landlords will provide their final report on performance against EESSH1 in 2021.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Completed

Policy:

2024 New Build Zero Emissions from Heat Standard: requiring new buildings to have zero emissions heating systems.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [2020-2021 PfG + CCPu]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

We have created an external, independently co-chaired working group to support development of Standard.

We have created a non-domestic sub-group to support main working group.

We have commissioned 3 research projects to consider cost implications, network issues and other key challenges associated with the introduction of zero emissions heating.

In December 2020, we launched our initial Scoping Consultation. This sets out the Scottish Government's high-level vision for Standard and is underpinned by a number of key outcomes. The consultation closed 3 March 2021.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

We committed to consulting on the Standard in 2020. This was achieved.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Next steps:

Consultation analysis.

Drafting and launch of technical consultation in 2021.

Drafting of regulations (timeframe TBC).

Policy:

Review of energy standards within building regulations. The review investigates the potential for further, significant improvement on 2015 standards and how building standards can support other carbon and energy policy outcomes, including our decarbonisation of heat agenda.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Maintained

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Research to inform review of current standards, last updated in 2015, was completed in 2020. An industry working group was convened in December 2020 and is currently supporting the review process. It is intended to publish a consultation on proposals for improved energy standards in April/May 2021 and to introduce legislation and supporting guidance in late 2021.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

Yes. Related indicator within CCPu – "% new homes built with a calculated space heating demand of not more than 20 kWh/m²/yrT". Initial report contribution provided in February 2021. Intent is that this percentage can be updated annually from energy performance certificate data from new home completions to illustrate the change delivered by periodic review of standards.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Intent to consult in April/May 2021 and make regulations in late 2021

Policy:

Heat in Buildings regulation: Put in place regulation to increase uptake of zero emissions heating systems and improve energy efficiency standards across all tenures, prioritising the raising of standards for households living in fuel poverty. Re-introduce revised regulations to the Scottish Parliament requiring mandatory minimum energy efficiency standards for the Private Rented Sector, to come into force from 2022.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [2020-2021 PfG]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Commitment in the draft Heat in Buildings Strategy to introduce regulations to achieve this, including a clear timeframe for consulting on and laying of regulations, and backstop dates for compliance. Requirement to take account of those in, or at risk of being in fuel poverty included as part of the vision for the strategy, and this will underpin the drafting of all regulations.

Regulations to set minimum standards for the Private Rented Sector have been paused as a direct result of Covid-19. However the commitment to introduce this as soon as practical remains.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

Milestones have been set in the draft Heat in Buildings Strategy regarding dates to consult and lay regulations.

Backstop dates for compliance have also been set. First dates have only just been introduced through the publication of the Heat in Buildings Strategy in February 2021.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Next steps:

PRS regs – to reintroduce to Parliament as soon as practical (not in this Parliament)

Owner Occupier regs – to consult in 2021/22

New build heat standards – consultation currently live

Policy:

Low Carbon Infrastructure Transition Programme (LCITP) - supports investment in decarbonisation of business and the public sector.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [2020-2021 PfG]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

The LCITP continues to provide support investment in decarbonisation of business and the public sector. Launched in September 2020 the Green Recovery: Low Carbon Energy Project Capital Funding Invitation targeted £50 million of support for project that demonstrate innovative low carbon heat solutions for buildings.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

No

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Applications for support closed 26 February 2021, with funding awards being issued in Q2.

Policy:

Expanded £1.6bn Heat in Buildings capital funding over the next parliament Building on the Low Carbon Infrastructure Transition Programme (LCITP) and existing energy efficiency and zero emissions heat support programmes.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [2020-2021 PfG]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

A call for evidence has been launched to seek input on actions to modify and enhance the range of support mechanism currently provided through the LCITP for development and delivery of large-scale low and zero carbon heat in buildings projects. This call will help us shape and deliver a future funding programme to help deliver capital projects.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Call for evidence closed at the end of April. We will continue to engage with stakeholders and the new fund will be launched towards the end of 2021.

Policy:

Non Domestic Public Sector Energy Efficiency (NDEE) Framework: A four year framework launched in March 2016, designed to support public and third sector organisations to procure Energy Efficiency retrofit work. The Framework will continue for a further four years commencing in 2020. NDEE Support Unit accelerates the number of projects and delivery timescales of public sector energy efficiency projects using the NDEE Framework and supports our wider ambitions around energy demand reduction.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Maintained

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

In 2020, the Scottish Government launched the 2nd generation Non-Domestic Energy Efficiency (NDEE) frameworks consisting of the NDEE over £1 Million Projects framework, NDEE sub £1 Million Projects framework and NDEE Project Support Unit framework.

These frameworks will continue to support public and third sector bodies in Scotland accelerate energy efficiency retrofit projects across their estates. The NDEE Frameworks are innovative in the way that they cover multiple and diverse energy efficiency and renewable energy solutions.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Frameworks and project support unit will operate until 2023

Policy:

The Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) - a GB-wide scheme created by the UK Government (with the agreement of the Scottish Government). UK Government is extending both the domestic and non-domestic RHI out to 2022

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [August 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

1,054.7 MW of accredited capacity under the non-domestic RHI between November 2011 and December 2020.

1,096 GWh of heat had been paid for between April 2014 and end May 2020 under the domestic RHI scheme in Scotland.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

Scotland consistently attracts more than its pro-rata share under the NDRHI, with around 19% of non-domestic accredited installations being in Scotland.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

The NDRHI closed as scheduled on 31 March 2021, though qualified extensions for both Tariff Guarantee and non-Tariff Guarantee applications were implemented prior to its closure.

The DRHI has been extended by one year and is currently scheduled to close on 31 March 2022, and is due to be followed by the Clean Heat Grant. The BEIS consultation on the closure of the scheme, 'The Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive – ensuring a stable scheme', closed on 7 May 2021.

Policy:

UK Green Gas Support Scheme - a GB-wide Green Gas Scheme is planned to come into force in 2022, stimulating biomethane injection into the gas grid.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [UK Government announcement]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

This is a new scheme scheduled to start in Autumn 2021.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

-

Policy:

UK Clean Heat Grant - a GB-wide Clean Heat Grant is planned to come into force in 2022, supporting uptake of heat pumps (and limited biomass boilers) via up-front grants.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [UK Government announcement]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

This is a new scheme scheduled to start in April 2022, following the closure of the DRHI.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

-

Policy:

Support for Heat Networks: the District Heating Loan Fund helps address the financial and technical barriers to district heating projects by offering low interest loans..

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Maintained

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

The District Heating Loan Fund continues to offer low interest loans to help overcome the financial barriers to the delivery of low carbon infrastructure projects.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

No

Timeframe and expected next steps:

DHLF expected to continue to offer funding throughout financial year 21/22.

Policy:

Implement the provisions of the Heat Networks (Scotland) Bill to create a strong regulatory framework to support delivery by 2023.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [2020-2021 PfG]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu: Bill passed unanimously by Scottish Parliament on 23 February 2021.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

Bill subject to two statutory deadlines:

1 April 2022: Publication of Heat Networks Delivery Plan

1 October 2023: Laying of SSI to set 2035 target for heat network supply.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Commitment on record to have first consultation on regulations in late-2021.

Commitment on record to deliver necessary regulations by end-2023.

Policy:

Continue to support the Heat Network Partnership - a collaboration of agencies focused on the promotion and support of district heating schemes in Scotland.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Maintained

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

The draft Heat in Buildings Strategy proposes repurposing the Heat Network Partnership in 2021 with a refreshed membership and remit focussed on enhanced heat network project pipeline development and subsequent delivery.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

Consultation closed 30 April 2021 with analysis of responses thereafter

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Refresh of HNP will take place in summer 2021 with launch of new Partnership in September 2021

Policy:

Net Zero Carbon Public Sector Buildings Standard will be introduced in 2021 and progressively rolled out across the public sector, as announced in the Programme for Government 2019.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [2020-2021 PfG + CCPu]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

The Standard has been finalised and approved by Scottish Ministers, and is being rolled out across a series of pathfinder projects. A steering group of public sector bodies is actively embedding the standard across new projects

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Pathfinder projects and further specific guidance are under development and will be completed in 2021

Policy:

Local Heat and Energy Efficiency Strategies (LHEES) will be in place by the end of 2023, setting out preferred heat solutions zones, guiding building owner decision making about replacement heating systems, and forming the basis for local delivery plans targeting heat and energy efficiency investment.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [2020-2021 PfG + CCPu]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

In parallel with a pilot programme (detailed below) we have developed a draft LHEES methodology with our delivery partner Zero Waste Scotland.

A peer review of this methodology has also been procured and completed.

Research has been undertaken to understand challenges arising from data access and management for LHEES and to recommend solutions.

We have engaged regularly with COSLA to discuss the roles and responsibilities, resourcing and governance relating to the production of LHEES and to determine the need for a statutory duty. This engagement is ongoing.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

All 32 Scottish local authorities have participated in, and completed a pilot programme for LHEES, testing different approaches and building capacity. Learning from the pilots has fed into a draft methodology for LHEES, which will set out a consistent approach for the production of LHEES.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

We have committed to having LHEES in place across all local authorities by the end of 2023. The next steps are to use and test the draft methodology to carry out the baseline analysis needed for LHEES at a national level. Alongside this we will consult with relevant stakeholders and engage with local authorities to implement LHEES. We will also continue to engage COSLA regarding a statutory duty on local authorities to produce LHEES.

Policy:

Assessment of Energy Performance and Emissions Regulations (Non-Domestic Buildings) - The Assessment of Energy Performance of Non-domestic Buildings (Scotland) Regulations 2016 require assessment of the energy performance and emissions of larger non-domestic buildings (those over 1,000 m²). A review programmed for 2021 will investigate and consult upon amended scope of standards and more challenging improvement targets to create a viable pathway for all existing non-domestic buildings to deliver the level of energy demand and emissions reductions needed.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Maintained

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Work to review the existing 2016 Regulations was paused in 2020 due to the Covid pandemic.

This will recommence later in 2021 with a view to developing proposals for consultation.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

The long term milestones for delivery are set in the Heat in Building Strategy – i.e. convert 0.5m buildings to ZE heat by 2030, and all by 2045.

The Heat in Buildings Strategy commits to introducing regulations to achieve this by 2025.

Delivery milestones (i.e. rollout/ progress) haven't been developed yet.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Consultation on proposals to increase ambition of existing 2016 Regulations during 2021-22.

Policy:

Support for community low and zero emissions heat projects through CARES.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Ongoing - heat decarbonisation is a key focus of the next CARES contract due to commence 1 April 2021, with tailored packages of support available to eligible applicants. Support will also be provided to eligible groups and organisations to encourage participation and take up of funding available under the Heat Transition Deal.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

Strategic policy direction will be provided to the contract delivery body through the SG Contract Manager in consultation with Heat Policy colleagues, to ensure CARES is aligned with SG heat decarbonisation objectives, with feedback on progress monitored through regular engagement and reporting commitments.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Duration of next CARES contract April 2021 – March 2025 and beyond. Learning obtained from projects supported.

Policy:

Salix financing facility to support investment in non-domestic buildings retrofit.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Maintained

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Salix Finance continues to deliver the Public Sector Energy Efficiency Loan Scheme on behalf of Scottish Government.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

£45 million in energy efficiency projects in Scotland to date, which is forecasted to save the public sector more than £129 million over the lifetime of the projects.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Ongoing

Policy:

Work with social landlords to bring forward the review of the existing Energy Efficiency Standard for Social Housing (EESSH2) with a view to strengthening and realigning the standard with net-zero requirements.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Initial discussion with sector representatives on bringing forward review of EESSH2 from 2025 to 2023

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

EESSH2 sets a performance target for energy efficiency in social housing by 2032

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Review in 2023

Policy:

Work with our partners, including the UK Government, local authorities and utility providers to determine the best approach to heat decarbonisation for buildings currently heated by natural gas.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Work is underway to develop an area-by-area understanding of the options for buildings currently using gas. A pathways project being managed in partnership with SGN, the ENA and NGG will support a more detailed understanding of the potential for green gas. The LHEES process will provide a platform for bringing together stakeholder insight, analysis and business planning on the longer-term right solutions.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

No

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Ongoing

Policy:

Review the system of building assessments and reports on energy performance and heat to ensure a system that is fit for purpose in meeting net zero emissions objectives for heat in buildings.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Commitment in the draft Heat in Buildings Strategy to reform the EPC assessment, including consultation in summer 21 on this, with focus on zero emissions and active change brought through recommended measures, and away from cost based metric.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

Milestone to consult in summer 2021. Work ongoing to achieve this goal

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Consultation to launch in June 2021

Policy:

Work with stakeholders to further understand and support the application and use of low and zero emissions heating within designated historic environment assets and hard to treat buildings.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

The Heat in buildings strategy - achieving net zero emissions: consultation published February 2021 contains a commitment to work with stakeholders, including Historic Environment Scotland (HES), to develop more solutions to transition Scotland's historic buildings to zero emissions heating while respecting and preserving the special characteristics of our buildings and places, and where needed continue to build our evidence base and the guidance available for the heat transition in these buildings and areas, including in our approach to regulation. The strategy also commits to working with HES to consider what specific provisions or exemptions may be needed within regulations to take account of buildings which are designated as listed or in conservation areas, in meeting requirements for decarbonisation of their heat supply and reducing their demand for heat.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

N/A

Timeframe and expected next steps:

A Heat in Heritage Buildings report is forthcoming which will provide a starting point for understanding the evidence base in relation to heat transition for historic and heritage buildings.

Policy:

Develop and introduce future regulation for non-domestic buildings and launch a consultation on these proposals.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Work to review the existing 2016 Regulations was paused in 2020 due to the Covid pandemic.

This will recommence later in 2021 with a view to developing proposals for consultation.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

The long term milestones for delivery are set in the Heat in Building Strategy – i.e. covert 0.5m buildings to ZE heat by 2030, and all by 2045.

The Heat in Buildings Strategy commits to introducing regulations to achieve this by 2025.

Delivery milestones (i.e. rollout/progress) haven't been developed yet.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Consultation on proposals to increase ambition of existing 2016 Regulations during 2021-22.

Policy:

Undertake work to identify the capacity and output of renewable electricity generation required in Scotland to support the projected roll-out of heat pumps.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Scottish Government will undertake more detailed analysis and modelling of the Scottish electricity system for the duration of the Climate Change Plan during 2021. This will include specific studies to identify how new electricity demand, particularly for heat, impacts on the necessary capacity of Scottish renewable electricity generation as well as the need for large scale transmission networks across Scotland and interconnection with the rest of the UK and our European neighbours. This work will also consider the impact of the electrification of transport.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

N/A

Timeframe and expected next steps:

During 2021

Policy:

Consider whether to extend Permitted Development Rights for zero-emission heat networks and micro-renewable technologies.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

We are carrying out a multi-phase review of permitted development rights (PDR) in Scotland. COVID-19 has affected the timetable. Heat networks PDR are now in phase 4.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

Work is in part dependent on progress with the wider legislative framework on heat networks. The Heat Networks (Scotland) Bill is at Stage 3 in Parliament.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Work on phase 4 PDR due to start Autumn 2021.

Heat network policy leads to advise on circumstances in which they would like to see PDR apply.

Policy:

Undertake work to better understand the impact on electricity networks of projected heat pump deployment. Work with the Distribution Network Operators through the Heat Electrification Partnership to build an evidence base to inform business planning. Work with industry and networks to understand need for heat pumps systems to be smart enabled, and identify options to integrate smart systems into our delivery programmes; and to explore how innovation can help to improve the consumer experience.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Through the heat in building strategy we have committed to forming a heat electrification partnership with Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks and SP Energy Networks, Scotland's two Distribution Network Operators. We have been working with both companies over the past year to support development of their Distribution Future Energy Scenarios, an important input to their next Business Plans. We are working to ensure the Methodology for our Local Heat and Energy Efficiency Strategies links clearly to the DNOs, ensuring a two way flow of information at the appropriate stage between local authorities and DNOs.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

No

Timeframe and expected next steps:

We will undertake research on generation and network requirements in terms of the scale and location of the demand in an electrification of heat scenario (in 2021)

We will undertake research on potential network investment costs of the heat transition for Scotland (ranges of costs and impacts on consumer) in 2021.

Policy:

Support heat networks through: Introducing a Non-Domestic Rates Relief for renewable and low carbon heat networks until 2023/24. Working to identify how new buildings in Heat Network Zones could be made ready to connect to heat networks. Including district heating within the Permitted Development Rights review. Through National Planning Framework 4, ensuring that local development plans take account of where a Heat Network Zone has been identified.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Regulations laid and being considered by Scottish Parliament on 24 February, ahead of taking effect on 1 April 2021.

Proposal included in consultation on New Build Heat Standard published in December 2020.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

Expect uptake of relief of c. £37k p.a.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Regs will run until 31 March 2024.

Anticipate that there will be a review of the relief and next steps nearer end date.

New build heat standard expected to be in place by 2024.

Policy:

Explore how local tax powers could be used to incentivise or encourage the retrofit of buildings, and commission further analysis to identify potential options.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

We recently consulted on our draft Heat in Buildings Strategy. Responses are being analysed.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Next steps will be set out in due course.

Policy:

Design future delivery programmes to ensure significantly accelerated retrofit of buildings, with new programmes to be in place from 2025.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

We recently consulted on our draft Heat in Buildings Strategy. Responses are being analysed.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Next steps will be set out in due course.

Outcome 3: Our gas network supplies an increasing proportion of green gas (hydrogen and biomethane) and is made ready for a fully decarbonised gas future

Policy:

Hydrogen for heat demonstrator – providing £6.9m support for SGN's H100 hydrogen for domestic heat demonstrator.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Boosted [2020-2021 PfG]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Complete – funding provided and the project is up and running

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

-

Policy:

Work with UK Government on product standards, with a view to making new gas boilers hydrogen-ready.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Underway, pending UKG consultation on product standards. Scottish Ministers have written to BEIS Ministers setting out our support for the development of hydrogen-ready boilers into the market

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

-

Outcome 4: The heat transition is fair, leaving no-one behind and stimulates employment opportunities as part of the green recovery

Policy:

Develop a long-term public engagement strategy in 2021 and begin implementation of early actions.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Further development of the policy narrative in the draft Heat in Buildings Strategy (published Feb 2021)

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

Not as yet

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Scoping work for strategy to commence in April 2021

Policy:

Smart Meter installation: All homes and businesses will be offered a smart meter by 2020 under a UK Government initiative, providing the opportunity for a greater understanding of final energy consumption.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

Maintained

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

The smart meter programme is owned and led by the UK Government who have responsibility for the policy, regulatory and commercial framework.

The Scottish Government is working to deliver a Smart Meter Advice Project (SMAP) through Home Energy Scotland (HES), to enable customers to make the most of the energy use data provided by their smart meters. HES now have a network of advisors trained to provide general smart meter information and recruit customers for SMAP. Each centre has a smart meter specialist fully trained to use the SMAP tool.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

As of August 2020 there were very nearly one million homes across Scotland with a smart meter installed and operating. This means that nearly 40% of households in Scotland have a smart meter.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) announced on 17 September 2019 that the smart meter rollout would be delayed by four years, with a new deadline for suppliers to install smart meters in 85% of homes by 2024.

In response to unavoidable impacts on the smart meter rollout due to the Coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic, on 18 June 2020 the UK Government announced an extension to the smart meter rollout's current All Reasonable Steps (ARS) obligation on suppliers by six months to 30 June 2021. The ARS obligation had been due to expire on 31 December 2020.

Policy:

Work with the Scottish Cities' Alliance and the seven cities on the opportunities to accelerate activity on heat and energy efficiency.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

The Scottish Government have provided funding support to the SCA to deliver a Carbon Scenario Tool to support both the cities net zero ambitions and the production of Local Heat and Energy Efficiency Strategies.

Additionally, the Low Carbon Infrastructure Transition Programme (LCITP) is supporting the development of a prospectus of heat network projects that has been produced by SCA.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

The Carbon Scenario Tool project has begun and is due for completion by end 2021.

Policy:

Provide capital investment for Scottish colleges for equipment to deliver training for energy efficiency and heat.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

This work is being delivered by the Energy Skills Partnership (ESP) via Energy Saving Trust and relates to 2 EV charging rigs, 5 heat pump training rigs, 3 solar thermal training rigs and an insulation training centre.

2 applications for heat pump training rigs, an application for solar thermal and 2 applications for EV charging have been received. However, Covid is creating some problems delivering this effectively due to:

  • Staff furloughed e.g. procurement staff who would normally do this work for curriculum teams
  • Access to buildings to measure and produce drawings of where equipment will fit is not possible due to Covid
  • ESP has experience of funds like this and in 'normal' times colleges are enthusiastic to receive this kind of funding – Covid is making this a challenge

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

See text in previous cell which sets out what was agreed.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Original intention was to have all the training rigs in place by the end of this FY but due to Covid its likely we will have to extend this.

Policy:

Respond to the recommendations of the Expert Advisory Group on a heat pump sector deal for Scotland, by Q1 2022.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

On track – the Heat Pump Sector Deal Expert Advisory group has now met on 4 occasions and is on track to deliver its interim report to Scottish Ministers after the Scottish Parliament election.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

N/A

Timeframe and expected next steps:

The group is expected to provide an interim report to Scottish Ministers after the May 2021 election, and final set of recommendations in summer 2021. Our draft Heat in Buildings Strategy commits to responding to those recommendations when we publish the final draft in Autumn 2021.

Policy:

Bring forward and support demonstrator projects, such as: hybrids and high temperature heat pumps; the use of hydrogen for space and water heating; projects to understand the impact of heat transition on existing energy networks.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

We are currently at the scoping stage and will provide an update at a later time.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

N/A

Timeframe and expected next steps:

-

Policy:

Publish a 'Heat Network Investment prospectus' in 2021/22 - a first-cut of HN Zones across Scotland, combined with information on decarbonisation needs of existing networks.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

-

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Due in 2021/22

Policy:

Establish a short life working group on finance for the heat transition.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

The draft Heat in Buildings Strategy published for consultation in February 2021 includes a proposal to establish a Green Heat Finance Task Force in 2021 to explore potential new and value for money innovative financing mechanisms for both at-scale and individual level investment in heat decarbonisation

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

Established 2021

Policy:

Establish principles to underpin our commitment to 'no-one being left behind' in the heat transition, ensuring our approach neither increases the fuel poverty rate nor increases the depth of existing fuel poverty. This will include the effective design and targeting of our fuel poverty and heat in buildings programmes.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

We have begun internal work on the principles and analysis to understand in detail the intersection of fuel poverty and heat decarbonisation. Programmes are already embedding these emerging principles.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

The Heat in Buildings Strategy provides more detail

Timeframe and expected next steps:

-

Policy:

Ensure Local Heat and Energy Efficiency Strategies are developed through extensive engagement with local communities.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

Since the last report we have launched and completed a final phase of 9 LHEES pilots in partnership with local authorities. All 32 Scottish local authorities have now piloted LHEES. Each of the three pilot phases have been evaluated. Alongside the pilot programme, regular engagement with local authorities has been undertaken through a combination of workshops, webinars and one-to-one engagement.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

All 32 Scottish local authorities have participated in, and completed a pilot programme for LHEES, testing different approaches and building capacity. Each of the three phases of the pilot programme have been independently evaluated, with key findings published on the Scottish Government website.

Timeframe and expected next steps:

We have committed to having LHEES in place across all local authorities by the end of 2023. We will consult on the draft LHEES methodology with relevant stakeholders and engage with local authorities to implement LHEES. We will also continue to engage COSLA regarding a statutory duty on local authorities to produce LHEES.

Policy:

Continue delivery of energy efficiency investment to support fuel poor households and conduct further modelling and analysis to better understand the potential impact of the heat transition on fuel poor households and the scale of, and options for, mitigation that may be required.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

We are conducting internal analysis to understand the intersection of fuel poverty and heat decarbonisation and we continue to evolve our schemes to ensure solutions are tailored to the specific circumstance of households

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

-

Policy:

Urge the UK Government to rebalance levy costs on energy bills to make gas and electric systems relatively more cost comparable.

Status: New, Boosted or Maintained compared to last CCP [date announced]:

New [CCPu 2020]

Progress on implementation since time of last report / CCPu:

We continue to press the UKG on this. In the Heat in Buildings Strategy we set out a series of actions required by the UKG if we are to deliver a rapid and just heat transition. Scottish Ministers have reiterated in recent correspondence with BEIS Ministers that the balance of energy costs must be addressed to incentivise zero emissions heating appropriately.

Have any implementation Indicators / milestones been set for this policy? If so, most recent data for progress against these.:

-

Timeframe and expected next steps:

-


Contact

Email: climate.change@gov.scot