Publication - Statistics

Characteristics of Recent and Established EEA and non-EEA migrants in Scotland: Analysis of the 2011 Census

Published: 24 Mar 2015
Part of:
Statistics
ISBN:
9781785441974

This report presents findings from analysis of the 2011 Census on characteristics and experiences of recent and established migrants from EEA and non-EEA countries living in Scotland.

41 page PDF

1.3 MB

41 page PDF

1.3 MB

Contents
Characteristics of Recent and Established EEA and non-EEA migrants in Scotland: Analysis of the 2011 Census
5. Health

41 page PDF

1.3 MB

5. Health

Self-assessed health

Recent migrants, both from EEA and non-EEA countries, were more likely to report their health as 'very good', than were established EEA and non-EEA migrants. The latter were proportionally more likely to report their health to be 'fair', 'bad', or 'very bad'. See Chart 5.1. The older age profile of established migrants compared to recent migrants should be noted when interpreting this analysis.

Chart 5.1. Self-assessed health, all migrants

Self assessed health all migrants

Source: 2011 Census, National Records of Scotland

Long term health problem or disability

In line with the pattern found for general health, established EEA and established non-EEA migrants were more likely than recent migrants to report a 'long term health problem or disability' that limited their day-to-day activities a lot (12 and 9 per cent respectively), or a little (both 12 per cent). See Chart 5.2.

Chart 5.2. Long-term health problem or disability, all migrants

Long term health problem or disability all migrants

Source: 2011 Census, National Records of Scotland


Contact

Email: Wendy van Rijswijk