Publication - Publication

Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly Scotland: report

Published: 3 Jun 2019

Scotland's results and the key recommendations for the continued protection, promotion and support for breastfeeding.

65 page PDF

2.3 MB

65 page PDF

2.3 MB

Contents
Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly Scotland: report
Footnotes

65 page PDF

2.3 MB

Footnotes

1. Victora et al (2016) Breastfeeding in the 21st century: epidemiology, mechanisms, and lifelong effect. Lancet 387 10017: 475-490.

2. Renfrew M et al (2012) Preventing disease and saving resources: the potential contribution of increasing breastfeeding rates in the UK, UNICEF UK

3. Pérez‐Escamilla et al (2018) Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly Index: Development and application for scaling‐up breastfeeding programmes globally. Matern Child Nutr. 2018;e12596.

4. Information Services Division Scotland (2018) Infant Feeding Statistics Scotland. Financial Year of Birth 2017/18

5. See Annex 01 for the Benchmarks for each Gear in the BBF Model

6. See Annex 02 for the BBF Scoring Methodology

7. Rollins et al (2016) Why invest, and what it will take to improve breastfeeding practices? Lancet vol 387 (10017):491-504.

8. Scottish Government (2017) Scottish maternal and infant nutrition survey 2017

9. Rollins et al (2016) Why invest, and what it will take to improve breastfeeding practices? Lancet vol 387 (10017):491-504.

10. Scottish Government (2011) Improving maternal and infant nutrition: a framework for action.

11. Scottish Government. Breastfeeding Programme for Government 2018-19

12. Scottish Government (2018) A healthier future: Scotland's diet and healthy weight delivery plan

13. Pérez-Escamilla et al (2012) Scaling Up of Breastfeeding Promotion Programs in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: the "Breastfeeding Gear" Model. American Society for Nutrition. Adv. Nutr. 3: 790-800, 2012

14. Unicef and WHO (2015) Breastfeeding Advocacy Initiative. For The Best Start In Life

15. Mangasaryan et al (2012) Breastfeeding promotion, support and protection: review of six country programmes. Nutrients. 2012;4(8):990-1014.

16. Henderson et al (2000) Representing infant feeding: content analysis of British media portrayals of bottle feeding and breastfeeding.

17. Scottish Government (2011) Improving Maternal and Infant Nutrition. A Framework for Action

18. Sun Kyung Kim et al (2018) Interventions promoting exclusive breastfeeding up to six months after birth: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Int. J. Nurs. Stud. 80 (April) (2018) 94-105

19. Renfrew et al (2012) Preventing disease and saving resources: the potential contribution of increasing breastfeeding rates in the UK. London: UNICEF UK, 2012; Rollins et al (2016) Why invest, and what it will take to improve breastfeeding practices? Lancet vol 387 (10017):491-504.

20. Scottish Government (2018) A healthier future: Scotland's diet and healthy weight delivery plan

21. NHS Health Scotland (2016) Off to a Good Start: all you need to know about breastfeeding. Edinburgh: NHS Health Scotland, 2016.

22. Scottish Government (2018) Scottish maternal and infant nutrition survey 2017

23. WHO (2003) Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding

24. https://www.legislation.gov.uk/asp/2005/1/contents

25. Rollins et al (2016) Why invest, and what it will take to improve breastfeeding practices? The Lancet, 387, 491-504.

26. Scottish Government (2018) A Healthier Future Scotland's Diet & Healthy Weight Delivery Plan

27. Global Breastfeeding Collective (2017) Nurturing the Health and Wealth of Nations: The Investment Case for Breastfeeding

28. Carroll et al (2018) Perspective: What Will It Cost to Scale-up Breastfeeding Programs? A Comparison of Current Global Costing Methodologies.

29. Rollins NC, Bhandari N, Hajeebhoy N et al. (2016) Why invest, and what it will take to improve breastfeeding practices? Lancet 387, 491-504.

30. McFadden et al (2017) Support for healthy breastfeeding mothers with healthy term babies. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2017

31. Brown, A. (2017) Breastfeeding as a public health responsibility: a review of the evidence. J Hum Nutr Diet.Dec;30(6):759-770.

32. Global Breastfeeding Collective (2017) A Call to Action.
https://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/global-breastfeeding-collective/en/

33. Global Breastfeeding Collective (2017) Investment Case for Breastfeeding.

34. Renfrew et al. (2012) Preventing disease and saving resources: the potential contribution of increasing breastfeeding rates in the UK

35. Pérez-Escamilla et al (2018) Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly Index: Development and application for scaling‐up breastfeeding programmes globally. Maternal and Child Nutrition, 14, 3

36. Lawton et al (2012) Employing an extended Theory of Planned Behaviour to predict breastfeeding intention, initiation, and maintenance in White British and South-Asian mothers living in Bradford. Br J Health Psychol 2012; 17: 854-71.

37. DiGirolamo et al (2005) Intention or experience? Predictors of continued breastfeeding. Health Educ Behav 2005; 32: 208-26. Cited in Rollins et al (2016)

38. Kervin et al (2010) Types and timing of breastfeeding support and its impact on mothers' behaviours. J Paediatr Child Health 2010; 46: 85-91. Cited in Rollins et al (2016)

39. Stein et al (1987). Social and psychiatric factors associated with the intention to breastfeed. J Reprod Infant Psychol 1987; 5: 165-71. Cited in Rollins et al (2016)

40. ILO C183 - Maternity Protection Convention, 2000 (No. 183). Convention concerning the revision of the Maternity Protection Convention (Revised), 1952 (Entry into force: 07 Feb 2002)

41. ILO Maternity Protection Resource Package (2012) Module 10

42. Roe et al (1999) Is there competition between breast-feeding and maternal employment? Demography 1999; 36: 157-71. Cited in Rollins et al (2016)

43. Visness & Kennedy (1997). Maternal employment and breast-feeding: findings from the 1988 National Maternal and Infant Health Survey. Am J Public Health 1997; 87: 945-50.

44. International Labour Organization (2014) Maternity and paternity at work: Law and practice across the world. Geneva: International Labour Organization. Cited in Rollins et al (2016)

45. Rollins et al. (2016) Why invest, and what it will take to improve breastfeeding practices? Lancet 387, 491-504

46. Pearce et al (2012) Millennium Cohort Study Child Health Group. Childcare use and inequalities in breastfeeding: findings from the UK Millennium Cohort Study. Archives of disease in childhood. 2012 Jan 1;97(1):39-42

47. WHO (2013) Breastfeeding policy: a globally comparative analysis. Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2013;91:398-406

48. Scottish Government Gender equality in the workplace. Pregnancy and maternity discrimination.

49. The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012

50. Equality and Human Rights Commission (2016) Pregnancy and maternity discrimination in the workplace: Recommendations for Change

51. Maternity Action (2014) Accommodating breastfeeding

52. Maternity Action (2018) Continuing to breastfeed when you return to work.

53. EHRC (2017) Employer toolkits: Understanding your responsibilities if your employee is expecting a baby

54. Scottish Business Pledge. Balanced Workforce.

55. Scottish Government. Gender Equality policy: Ensuring fairer workplaces for women

56. Equality Challenge unit (2018) Athena SWAN is an initiative of the Equality Challenge Unit (ECU), which works to further and support equality and diversity for staff and students in higher education institutions across all four nations of the UK and in colleges in Scotland.

57. Save the Children (2018) Don't push it: Why the formula industry must clean up its act

58. WHO (1981) International code of marketing of breast-milk substitutes. Geneva: World Health Organization; 1981.

59. UNCRC: UN Convention on the Rights of the Child

60. WHO, IBFAN and UNICEF (2018) Marketing of breast-milk substitutes: national implementation of the international code, status report 2018.

61. The Notification of Marketing of Food for Particular Nutritional Uses (Scotland) Regulations 2007
https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ssi/2007/37/contents/made

62. The Foods for Specific Groups (Scotland) Regulations 2016
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ssi/2016/190/made/data.htm?wrap=true
;
https://www.foodstandards.gov.scot/business-and-industry/safety-and-regulation/foods-for-particular-nutritional-uses

63. WHO, IBFAN and UNICEF (2018) Marketing of breast-milk substitutes: national implementation of the international code, status report 2018.

64. Unicef UK (2016) A Call to Action on Breastfeeding

65. Scottish Government (2011) Improving Maternal and infant and Nutrition: A Framework for Action

66. Unicef UK (2012) The evidence and rationale for the Unicef UK Baby Friendly Initiative standards

67. Dyson et al 2006; Renfrew et al, 2005; Renfrew et al, 2012b), cited in Unicef UK (2012)

68. https://www.unicef.org.uk/babyfriendly/

69. Pérez-Escamilla , Martinez and Segura-Perez (2016). Impact of the Baby‐friendly Hospital Initiative on breastfeeding and child health outcomes: a systematic review. Maternal and Child Nutrition,12, 402-411

70. Unicef UK (2012) The evidence and rationale for the Unicef UK Baby Friendly Initiative standards

71. Scottish Government (2017) The best start: five-year plan for maternity and neonatal care

72. Unicef UK (2012) The evidence and rationale for the Unicef UK Baby Friendly Initiative standards; Hoddinott et al (2009) Effectiveness of a policy to provide breastfeeding groups (BIG) for pregnant and breastfeeding mothers in primary care, BMJ 338:a3026

73. Scottish Government (2018) Scottish Maternal and Infant Nutrition Survey 2017

74. Trickey et al. (2018) A realist review of one-to-one breastfeeding peer support experiments conducted in developed country settings. Maternal and Child Nutrition, 14(1)

75. Hoddinott et al. (2012) (cited in PHE, 2018)

76. Renfrew et al. (2012) Preventing disease and saving resources: the potential contribution of increasing breastfeeding rates in the UK;

77. Scottish Government (2018) A Healthier Future - Scotland's Diet & Healthy Weight Delivery Plan

78. McFadden et al (2017) Support for healthy breastfeeding mothers with healthy term babies Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2017, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD001141

79. Whitford et al (2018) Routinely collected infant feeding data: Time for global action. Maternal and Child Nutrition, 14 (4) October 2018

80. Unicef UK (2013) The evidence and rationale for the UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Initiative standards.

81. Lancet (2016) Breastfeeding series.

82. ILO C183 - Maternity Protection Convention, 2000 (No. 183). Convention concerning the revision of the Maternity Protection Convention (Revised), 1952 (Entry into force: 07 Feb 2002)

83. Citizens Advice Scotland. Equality Act 2010. Sex discrimination.

84. Equality and Human Rights Commission (2015) Pregnancy and Maternity-Related Discrimination and Disadvantage First findings: Surveys of Employers and Mothers.

85. Maternity Action (2016). Breastfeeding at work. EasyJet case


Contact

Email: julie.muir@gov.scot