Publication - Statistics

The Anholt-Ipsos Nation Brands IndexSM: 2020 Report for Scotland

This report discusses the 2020 findings from the Anholt-Ipsos Nation Brand IndexSM (NBI) survey. NBI data are used to report on the International Indicator on 'Scotland's reputation'.

Footnotes

1. National Performance Framework

2. The Government's programme for Scotland - 2018-2019

3. The rank is informative of a country's reputation relative to other countries, and may change in relation to other countries' performance.

4. The score provides a more absolute understanding of how a country is viewed overall and by each of the individual panel countries. The score therefore may be regarded as a more reliable indicator of a country's reputation over time.

5. Increases and decreases have not been significance tested.

6. Any difference within +/- one point of the previously available figure (Scotland has subscribed to the NBISM biennially since 2010) suggests that the position is more likely to be maintaining than showing any change. A reduction of one point or more suggests the position is improving while an increase of one point or more suggests the position is worsening.

7. In other words, whilst Scotland's score maintained between 2018 and 2020, other countries' scores increased over this period, resulting in a change in Scotland's relative rank.

8. The United Kingdom sample includes Scotland.

9. National Performance Framework

10. All rankings presented in the report are out of 50.

11. The overall score for each of the dimensions is out of 100, while the score for each of the attributes is an average of respondents' scores, based on a scale from 1.0 to 7.0 (1.0 being the lowest and worst and 7.0 being the highest and best).

12. The NBISM score is an average of the scores from the six NBISM dimensions.

13. Figures have been rounded to one decimal place.

14. Any difference within +/- one point of the previously available figure (Scotland has subscribed to the NBI biennially since 2010) suggests that the position is more likely to be maintaining than showing any change. A reduction of one point or more suggests the position is improving while an increase of one point or more suggests the position is worsening.

15. A decile is any of the nine values that divide the sorted data into ten equal parts, so that each part represents 1/10 of the sample or population.

16. The 20 core panel countries do not include Scotland as a panel country.

17. The United Kingdom sample includes Scotland.

18. The United Kingdom sample includes Scotland.

19. An average of scores from respondents from each of the panel countries on their overall opinion of Scotland is calculated. Responses are given on a scale from 1.0 (extremely unfavourable) to 7.0 (extremely favourable) with 4.0 being neither favourable nor unfavourable.

20. The United Kingdom sample includes Scotland.

21. The NBISM score is an average of the scores from the six NBISM dimensions. Each of the six dimensions is an average of the scores of the ratings questions from the dimension's attributes. There are between three and five attributes for each of the dimensions.

22. For dimension calculations, the responses to each attribute are converted from its original seven point scale to a 1-100 scale. That is done by creating a new score for each attribute. Each of the six dimensions are created, for each country, by calculating a respondent's mean of the newly transformed scores of the attributes that make up that dimension.

23. Dimension scores are presented as a score out of 100, calculated as an average of the scores given for the underlying attributes (e.g. the Exports dimension is an average of the attributes: contribution to innovation and science, products and services and country as a creative place).

24. The United Kingdom sample includes Scotland.

25. The scores for attributes are based on a scale from 1.0 to 7.0 (where 1.0 is low and 7.0 is high).

26. This is because rank is responsive to changes in the sample of countries being evaluated while absolute score is not.

27. The United Kingdom sample includes Scotland.

28. The scores for attributes are based on a scale from 1.0 to 7.0 (where 1.0 is low and 7.0 is high).

29. The point size of each word relates to its rank, with the smallest point size representing rank 1 (least chosen), and the largest point size representing rank 10 (most chosen).

30. Figures may not add up due to rounding.

31. The United Kingdom sample includes Scotland.

32. The scores for attributes are based on a scale from 1.0 to 7.0 (where 1.0 is low and 7.0 is high).

33. The point size of each word relates to its rank, with the smallest point size representing rank 1 (least chosen), and the largest point size representing rank 10 (most chosen).

34. The United Kingdom sample includes Scotland.

35. The scores for attributes are based on a scale from 1.0 to 7.0 (where 1.0 is low and 7.0 is high).

36. The point size of each word relates to its rank, with the smallest point size representing rank 1 (least chosen), and the largest point size representing rank 10 (most chosen).

37. The United Kingdom sample includes Scotland.

38. The scores for attributes are based on a scale from 1.0 to 7.0 (where 1.0 is low and 7.0 is high).

39. The point size of each word relates to its rank, with the smallest point size representing rank 1 (least chosen), and the largest point size representing rank 10 (most chosen).

40. The United Kingdom sample includes Scotland.

41. The scores for attributes are based on a scale from 1.0 to 7.0 (where 1.0 is low and 7.0 is high).

42. The point size of each word relates to its rank, with the smallest point size representing rank 1 (least chosen), and the largest point size representing rank 10 (most chosen).

43. The data collected from these respondents are exclusively for the Scottish Government. Therefore, this information is not shared with any other client.

44. Note that the figures in Table 11 have been rounded.

45. All rankings presented in the report are out of 50.

46. The overall score for each of the dimensions is out of 100, while the score for each of the attributes is an average of respondents' scores, based on a scale from 1.0 to 7.0 (1.0 being the lowest and worst and 7.0 being the highest and best).

47. Familiarity score is presented as the percentage of respondents who had at least some knowledge of Scotland.

48. Favorability scores are given on a scale from 1.0 (extremely unfavourable) to 7.0 (extremely favourable) with 4.0 being neither favourable nor unfavourable


Contact

Email: eva.kleinert@gov.scot