Publication - Research and analysis

Young people's participation in decision making: attitudes and perceptions

Published: 12 May 2020

Research on young people’s involvement in decision making in schools and out-of-school activities and groups through the Young People in Scotland survey.

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29 page PDF

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Contents
Young people's participation in decision making: attitudes and perceptions
3. Views on decision making in out of school activities

29 page PDF

629.9 kB

3. Views on decision making in out of school activities

Pupils who took part in out of school activities and groups were asked a series of questions about their perceptions of adults regarding decision making in those activities.

61 per cent took part in out of school activities. Participation was highest among pupils in S1 (67 per cent) and lowest in S4 and S6 (both 57 per cent). Pupils in the most deprived SIMD quintiles (SIMD 1 48 per cent, SIMD 2 58 per cent) were less likely to take part in out of school activities compared with those in the other quintiles (all 67 per cent). There was no difference in participation levels by gender.

Pupils were asked to agree or disagree with three statements about the adults that run out of school activities:

  • I feel able to let the adults know my views on how those groups/activities are run
  • Adults are good at listening to my views, in those groups/activities.
  • Adults are good at taking my views into account when making decisions that affect me, in those groups/activities.

Ability to make views known

Respondents were more positive about adults who run out of school activities and groups than about adults in general. As Figure 3.1 shows, 67 per cent of respondents who took part in out of school activities or groups felt that they were able to let adults know their views on how the activities were run while only 9 per cent disagreed.

Figure 3.1 Agreement with statement 'I feel able to let adults know my views on how the groups/activities are run'
Figure 3.1 Agreement with statement 'I feel able to let adults know my views on how the groups/activities are run'

Base: 1085

There was no significant change in responses from 2017, when 70 percent agreed and 8 per cent disagreed.

Boys were more positive about adults who run out of school activities or groups than girls. Figure 3.2 shows that 73 per cent of boys felt able to let adults know their views on how activities are run, compared with 62 per cent of girls.

Figure 3.2 Agreement with the statement 'I feel able to let adults know my views on how the groups/activities are run', by gender
Figure 3.2 Agreement with the statement 'I feel able to let adults know my views on how the groups/activities are run', by gender

Base: 1085

As Figure 3.3 shows, pupils in S4 were most likely to agree (72 per cent) that they could make their views known while pupils in S1 and S5 were least likely to agree (both 64 per cent).

Figure 3.3 Agreement with the statement 'I feel able to let adults know my views on how the groups/activities are run', by school year
Figure 3.3 Agreement with the statement 'I feel able to let adults know my views on how the groups/activities are run', by school year

Base: 1085

Those with a mental or physical health condition were less likely to agree that adults who run these groups and activities were good at listening to them (65 per cent) than those without a health condition (75 per cent).

Figure 3.4 Agreement with the statement 'I feel able to let adults know my views on how the groups/activities are run', by area deprivation
Figure 3.4 Agreement with the statement 'I feel able to let adults know my views on how the groups/activities are run', by area deprivation

Base: 1085

As Figure 3.4 shows, those in SIMD 4 (63 per cent) were slightly less likely to agree that they could make their views known than those in other SIMD quintiles (66 per cent to 70 per cent).

Adults listening to young people

Pupils were also asked their perception of adults who run the groups and activities listening to their views. As Figure 3.5 shows, 65 per cent of respondents agreed that these adults were good at listening to their views, while 7 per cent disagreed.

Figure 3.5 Agreement with the statement 'Adults are good at listening to my views, in these activities/groups'
Figure 3.5 Agreement with the statement 'Adults are good at listening to my views, in these activities/groups'

Base: 1085

Again there was little difference between responses in 2019 and 2017 (70 per cent agreed, 8 per cent disagreed).

Boys were slightly more likely to agree that that adults running the groups or activities were good at listening to their views (68 per cent) than girls (63%).

As Figure 3.6 shows, there was no consistent pattern between school years. S6 pupils were most likely to agree that adults running the groups or activities were good at listening to their views (71 per cent) while pupils in S5 were least likely to agree (58 per cent).

Figure 3.6 Agreement with the statement 'Adults are good at listening to my views, in these activities/groups' by school year
Figure 3.6 Agreement with the statement 'Adults are good at listening to my views, in these activities/groups' by school year

Base: 1085

Those with a mental or physical health condition were less likely to agree that adults who run these groups and activities were good at listening to them (62 per cent) than those without a health condition (67 per cent).

Figure 3.7 Agreement with the statement 'Adults are good at listening to my views, in these activities/groups' by deprivation area
Figure 3.7 Agreement with the statement 'Adults are good at listening to my views, in these activities/groups' by deprivation area

Base: 1085

As Figure 3.7 shows, pupils from the least deprived SIMD quintile were most likely to agree that adults running the groups or activities were good at listening to their views (71 per cent), compared with those in the most deprived quintile (61 per cent).

Adults taking young people's views into account

Pupils were asked how good the adults who run the groups or activities were at taking their views into account when making decisions that affect them. As Figure 3.8 shows, 64 per cent agreed that adults were good at taking their views into account when making decisions that affect them, while 6 per cent disagreed.

Similar to the previous questions, there was no significant difference between responses in 2017.

Figure 3.8 Agreement with the statement 'Adults are good at taking my views into account, in these activities/groups'
Figure 3.8 Agreement with the statement 'Adults are good at taking my views into account, in these activities/groups'

Base: 1085

As Figure 3.9 shows, pupils in S4 were most likely to agree (72 per cent) that adults who run out of school activities were good at taking their views into account when making decisions that affect them. Pupils in S5 were least likely to agree (59 per cent).

Figure 3.9 Agreement with the statement 'Adults are good at taking my views into account, in these activities/groups', by school year
Figure 3.9 Agreement with the statement 'Adults are good at taking my views into account, in these activities/groups', by school year

Base: 1085

Those with a mental or physical health condition were less likely to agree that adults who run groups and activities were good at taking their views into account (61 per cent) than those without (67 per cent).

As Figure 3.10 shows, those in most deprived SIMD quintile were less likely to agree (58 per cent) than those is the second least deprived quintile (68 per cent).

Figure 3.10 Agreement with the statement 'Adults are good at taking my views into account, in these groups/activities', by area deprivation
Figure 3.10 Agreement with the statement 'Adults are good at taking my views into account, in these groups/activities', by area deprivation

Base: 1085

There was no significant gender difference in response to this question.


Contact

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