Publication - Impact assessment

Scotland's careers strategy - moving forward: equality impact assessment

Published: 6 Apr 2020
Directorate:
Fair Work, Employability and Skills Directorate
Part of:
Work and skills
ISBN:
9781839606656

Equality impact assessment for the careers strategy for Scotland.

22 page PDF

227.5 kB

22 page PDF

227.5 kB

Contents
Scotland's careers strategy - moving forward: equality impact assessment
Impact of the Careers Strategy for those in protected groups

22 page PDF

227.5 kB

Impact of the Careers Strategy for those in protected groups

Drawing upon the evidence above, this EQIA has not identified any potential negative impacts of the policy to those who have protected characteristics.

However, we recognise that there are some evidence data gaps in relation to some equality groups and intersectionality that will be required to be addressed in the future. Reviewing each action/recommendation that emerges from implementation will provide an opportunity to assess what impact can be made in relation to access and outcomes for those with protected characteristics.

Age

The Careers Strategy has a positive impact on age, eliminating unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation as well as advancing equality of opportunity. Key ways that the strategy achieves this is:

  • The policy proposition does not discriminate based on age, and aims to reinforce an all-age service which is accessible to all.
  • We recognise that those who are of a younger and older age, may face disadvantages in the labour market. Therefore the careers strategy seeks to develop a national model for career education, information, advice and guidance services with shared principles adopted across education, training and employability services for young people and adults.
  • The policy provides people with career management skills and access to high quality career information and guidance to manage their careers. This will play an important role in helping to achieve inclusive economic growth.
  • Young people often identify parents and/or carers as the most significant influencer in their career choices and decisions. Therefore the strategy must consider that parents and carers may also require support to progress and advance their own career, including where they may need to upskill and reskill in response to shifts in the economy and labour market.
  • We acknowledge that there is scope to do more employer engagement coordinated activities with partners in primary, secondary, vocational education and training providers, higher and further education institutions.
  • The strategy also recognises that there is a need to enhance support for the adult workforce.
  • The strategy aims to adopt a consistent 'Needs based model'. Not only does this acknowledge the age and stage of individuals, but it allows a blend of factors to shape the services an receives or accesses.
  • The strategy aims for a National Resource of an online profile tool that every individual in Scotland will have access to. This will be a life-long support tool, which will be accessible to all, and designed in a way that follows the individual throughout education and their career.

Disability

The Careers Strategy has a positive impact on disability, areas that a positive impact have been identified are; eliminating unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation; advancing equality of opportunity; and promoting good relations among and between disabled and non-disabled people. This can be evidenced by:

  • The policy setting out how the CIAG system will ensure that all individuals have access to careers support to fulfil their potential. We acknowledge that there are inequalities and issues facing disabled people, including young disabled people, when entering employment that the 'A Fairer Scotland for Disabled People: employment action plan' considers. However, CIAG has a role in addressing these inequalities and as such the careers strategy will:
    • - work with delivery partners to better promote and communicate career options through their activity targeting those with protected equality characteristics, including disabled young people;
    • - maximise opportunities to engage with parents/carers, face to face and online, to provide the information they need to improve engagement with partners, including schools and parents, to increase understanding of what works in building resilience and aspiration among disabled young people.
    • The Strategy states that it is critical to target our collective resources effectively and efficiently to those who need more intensive support.
    • The Strategy will align career information, advice and guidance services in Scotland; enhancing our lifelong careers service, which is responsive to labour market change and user needs, including those of young disabled people making their first steps into the world of work. We will work with delivery partners to better promote and communicate career options through their activity targeting those with protected equality characteristics, including disabled young people;

Ultimately, increasing the number of disabled people in the workforce should have a positive effect on understanding the challenges disabled people face, as well as the skills and abilities they have to contribute to the workplace. In addition, increasing the number of disabled parents who are successful in progressing in work could promote better relations within the work environment.

Sex

Continuing from the points mentioned above, the Careers Strategy sets out how the CIAG system will ensure that all individuals have access to careers support to fulfil their potential and takes into account the role careers advice can play in specifically tackling inequalities women can face in the labour market.

We acknowledge that there are issues around women feeling encouraged into STEM careers are something that the STEM Implementation Group would review. However we also recognise that Careers Information, Advice and Guidance can help to overcome this challenge. Therefore, the strategy will consider linking up with the STEM Implementation Group during the strategy's implementation stage to discuss CIAG.

In addition, the strategy links with "A fairer Scotland for women: gender pay gap action plan" as it sets out the high level vision for high quality CIAG services accessible to all, and which reflects the importance of challenging occupational segregation.

The careers service challenges gender stereotypes in schools and preventing early bias in career choices, when it's known most young people first form ideas for their future career.

The Gender Commission aims to offer practical solutions to help employers tackle barriers to improving gender balance in their workforce and the recommendations will go on to inform how we can better assist businesses of all sizes, through policy and practice.

Pregnancy and Maternity

The Careers Strategy sets out how the CIAG system will ensure that all individuals including women who are pregnant and or are on maternity leave have access to careers advice.

There is evidence that pregnant women are often discriminated against and can experience a loss in pay or status as a result of being pregnant. Supporting mothers back into work could therefore help promote the value of employing individuals from these groups and contribute to the elimination of any discrimination /harassment /victimisation. In order to do this, during implementation the strategy will consider the CIAG digital presence to allow everybody – including women returners and those on maternity leave – to access the service whilst being able to undertake any caring responsibilities and any challenges presented by face-to-face provision.

The strategy also commits to a professionally-led, aligned and flexible system of careers support for every citizen, regardless of where they live in Scotland, their age and circumstance (including pregnancy)

In addition, there is evidence which shows that mothers/pregnant women face barriers and challenges in work. Supporting individuals from this group to with CIAG, and providing Career Management Skills to help boost their resilience to re-enter the labour market could therefore help to reduce this inequality faced.

Therefore, supporting the creation of a more diverse workforce could promote better relations within the work environment.

Gender Reassignment

Whilst this impact assessment does not recognise any policy impacts to transsexual people due to a lack of available data, transsexual people will have access to the careers service and service delivery partners are expected to apply their equality policies in providing equality of opportunity to users of their services.

As mentioned earlier in this EQIA, the strategy seeks to develop a national model for career education, information, advice and guidance services with shared principles adopted across education, training and employability services for young people and adults. These shared principles include treating people with dignity and respect, ensuring a sharing of knowledge and expertise in professional development, quality assurance, and improved outcomes – this will provide an opportunity to eliminate discrimination and share good practice in relation to the delivery of careers services.

The strategy promotes the consideration of individuals circumstances whilst recognising they may require a blend of support to help fulfil their potential. Providing equal access to CIAG support could support more transsexual people to access the labour market and progress within their careers. This could support the creation of a more diverse workforce could promote better relations within the work environment.

However, we also acknowledge that there are gaps in our data regarding CIAG for those who have undertaken or are undertaking gender reassignment. Therefore we will consult with specialist groups such as Stonewall (who have the 'Starting Out' careers guide) to discuss the careers strategy during implementation.

Sexual Orientation

This impact assessment does not recognise any policy impacts to individuals due to their sexual orientation due to the lack of available data. However people with protected characteristics will have access to careers service and as above. Service delivery partners are expected to apply their equality policies to eliminate any discrimination users may encounter in accessing to support and services and will need to ensure that the services they deliver comply with the Public Sector Equality Duty.

We acknowledge that there are gaps in our data regarding CIAG for people in regards to their sexuality. Therefore we will consult with specialist groups to discuss the careers strategy during and consider this further at implementation.

In addition, public Sector delivery partners will need to ensure that the services they deliver comply with the Public Sector Equality Duty.

Race

This policy proposition does not discriminate based on race and aims to reinforce an all-age service which is accessible to all. This EQIA identifies positive impacts the strategy has on individuals on the grounds of their race:

  • The strategy seeks to develop a national model for career education, information, advice and guidance services with shared principles adopted across education, training and employability services for young people and adults. These shared principles include treating people with dignity and respect, ensuring a sharing of knowledge and expertise in professional development, quality assurance, and improved outcomes – this will provide an opportunity to eliminate discrimination and share good practice in relation to the delivery of careers services.
  • The strategy links with the Race Equality Action Plan: We will work with Education Scotland to develop professional learning resources in partnership with Regional Collaboratives for Skills Development Scotland and CIAG staff, teachers and practitioners that raise awareness of minority ethnic employability issues and the priority actions that can help address these challenges.

As evidenced from the Key Findings section of this assessment, there are educational attainment to labour market challenges for minority ethnic people. We recognise that CIAG has a role to play in this which will be explored further during implementation.

The next steps would include:

  • Teaching all young people about their career management skills to improve their resilience and help balance other influences.
  • Adult CLD will be explored wider.

The policy proposition does not discriminate and aims to reinforce an all-age service which us accessible to all, as links with the Race Equality Action Plan to raise awareness of minority ethnic employability issues and the priority actions that can help address these challenges.

Religion

This impact assessment also identifies the new strategy to have positive impacts on people because of their religion or belief. The Careers Strategy sets out how CIAG system will ensure that all individuals have access to careers support to fulfil their potential and takes into account the role careers advice can play in tackling inequalities people can face in the labour market. The Strategy does not discriminate based on religion or belief, and aims to reinforce an all-age service which is accessible to all.

We acknowledge there are some gaps in data in relation to religion/belief. Consideration will be given at the implementation stage to fill knowledge gaps and shape services. The strategy commits to a life-long careers system which delivers high quality, personalised support to the user at point of need, regardless of setting or circumstances.

Public Sector delivery partners will also need to ensure that the services they deliver comply with the Public Sector Equality Duty.

In addition, as evidenced from Key Findings section, there are labour market challenges for people from particular religious groups. We recognise that CIAG has a role to play in this which will be explored further during implementation.

The next steps would include:

  • Teaching all young people about their career management skills to improve their resilience and help balance other influences.
  • Adult CLD will be explored wider.

As such, supporting the creation of a more diverse workforce could promote better relations within the work environment.


Contact

Email: sgcareersstrategy@gov.scot