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Energy Efficient Scotland Transition Programme Survey Evaluation

This report presents the social evaluation of the Energy Efficient Scotland Transition Programme, which aimed to support local authorities’ engagement with households and businesses expected to self-fund energy efficiency improvements.


Footnotes

1. Also known previously as 'Able to pay' service

2. The programme was called Scotland's Energy Efficiency Programme (SEEP) at the start of the pilots, but the name was later changed to Energy Efficient Scotland.

3. Whilst there may be subtle differences, the terms 'drop-in centre' and 'hub' are used interchangeably in this report. In some cases, the drop-in centre as a community engagement strategy had been established at the time of the Transition Programme, e.g. in Peebles by Changeworks. See Changeworks (2019) Scotland's Energy Efficient Programme (Energy Efficient Scotland) Stage 2 Transition Pilot Final Report. Available at: CW_in_Peebles_Interim_Full_Report.pdf (changeworks.org.uk)

4. Refer to: Scottish Government, Energy Saving Trust and University of Edinburgh (2018) Energy Efficient Scotland – Phase 1 Pilots Evaluation Final Report, Available at: EES-Pilot-Evaluation-Phase-1-Final-Report1.pdf (heatandthecity.org.uk)

5. Scottish Government and University of Edinburgh (2018) Energy Efficient Scotland Phase 2 Pilots: Final Social Evaluation Report. Available at EES Phase 2 pilots: final social evaluation report - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)

6. National Records of Scotland (2020) Mid-Year Population Estimates Scotland. Available at: Infographic Summary (nrscotland.gov.uk)

7. For example, like many other countries, Scotland has an ageing population with a higher proportion of those aged 65 and over residing in more rural areas like the Scottish Borders Council (which had 24.8% of its population aged 65 or over in 2019), and the Highland Council (which had 22.5% of its population aged 65 or over in 2019). This is in comparison to urban areas, such as Aberdeen City (which had 19.6% of its population aged 65 and over in 2019).

8. Refer to: Scottish Government (2020) Poverty and Income Inequality in Scotland 2016-2019, Table 1, Available at: Poverty and Income Inequality in Scotland 2016-19 - gov.scot (www.gov.scot); The Scottish Public Health Observatory (2021) Older people: Scottish population demographics. Available at: Scottish population demographics - ScotPHO

9. A degree of discretion is required here as formal definitions of what constitutes a city, town, village and dispersed rural area were not provided to respondents.

10. This is expected since the engagement services targeted owners, and the largest proportions of tenant households in Scotland are in Dundee City, Glasgow City, Orkney Islands and West Dunbartonshire, which were areas not included in this pilot.

11. Refer to: Ofgem (2015) Insights paper on households with electric and other non-gas heating, Table 1 (p.10) [pdf] Available at: insightspaperonhouseholdswithelectricandothernon-gasheatingpdf (ofgem.gov.uk)

12. EES: the future of low carbon heat for off gas buildings - call for evidence - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)

13. Refer to: Scottish Government and University of Edinburgh (2018) Energy Efficient Scotland Phase 2 Pilots: Final Social Evaluation Report, p.33. Available at EES Phase 2 pilots: final social evaluation report - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)

14. The 'usefulness' of advice provided by the Council's Energy Efficient Scotland programme was not clearly defined. Therefore, this would be subject to different interpretations from different respondents, and so a degree of caution is required.

15. Scottish Government and University of Edinburgh (2018) Energy Efficient Scotland Phase 2 Pilots: Final Social Evaluation Report, p.44. Available at EES Phase 2 pilots: final social evaluation report - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)

16. For this question, respondents were given the option of stating more than one answer – i.e. provided as many answers as they liked from the list provided. In this instance, the total percentage will not add up to 100%.

17. UK Government (2011) Behaviour Change and Energy Use. Available at: 2135-behaviour-change-and-energy-use.pdf (publishing.service.gov.uk)

18. UK Government (2011) Behaviour Change and Energy Use, p.12. Available at: 2135-behaviour-change-and-energy-use.pdf (publishing.service.gov.uk)

19. For this question, respondents were given the option of stating more than one answer – i.e. provided as many answers as they liked from the list provided. In this instance, the total percentage will not add up to 100%.

20. Refer to: Scottish Government, Energy Saving Trust and University of Edinburgh (2018) Energy Efficient Scotland – Phase 1 Pilots Evaluation Final Report, Available at: EES-Pilot-Evaluation-Phase-1-Final-Report1.pdf (heatandthecity.org.uk) and, Scottish Government and University of Edinburgh (2018) Energy Efficient Scotland Phase 2 Pilots: Final Social Evaluation Report. Available at EES Phase 2 pilots: final social evaluation report - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)

Contact

Email: HeatInBuildings@gov.scot

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