Information

Sexual Assault Response Coordination Service (SARCS): easy read

This leaflet provides information on how to self-refer to a Sexual Assault Response Coordination Service (SARCS) in an easy read format. It provides information on accessing healthcare through NHS Scotland for anyone who has been raped or sexually assaulted.


What options are available to me?

You can tell the police.

If you have been raped or sexually assaulted, you can tell the police at any time. Contact details for Police Scotland are at the end of this leaflet. You might want to ask someone you trust to help you do this.

Depending on when the assault happened, the police can support you to attend a SARCS. The SARCS staff will look after your health and wellbeing needs. If the assault took place in the last 7 days, you may have a medical examination.

This examination is carried out by a medical professional. They may be able to collect evidence. This could help the police find the person who carried out the assault. This evidence may include bodily fluids or hair.

You can self-refer to a SARCS

You may not be ready to tell the police or are unsure. Self-referral means that you can make an appointment at a SARCS by yourself. You do not need to ask your GP or anyone else to do it for you.

This self-referral service is for anyone age 16 or over.

If you are under 16, you can find information about where you can go for help at www.nhsinform.scot/sarcs

If you self-refer, the SARCS staff will look after your health and wellbeing needs. If the assault has happened in the last 7 days, you may be offered a medical examination. The examination will happen in the same way as it would if you tell the police.

The SARCS will keep your evidence safe for 26 months (2 years and 2 months) from the day of your examination. This is in case you want to tell the police later. If you choose not to tell the police, your evidence will be destroyed after 26 months.

Contact

Email: CMOTaskforce.secretariat@gov.scot

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