Publication - Publication

Annual report on procurement activity in Scotland: 2019

Published: 4 Apr 2019
Directorate:
Scottish Procurement and Commercial Directorate
Part of:
Public sector
ISBN:
9781787816879

An overview of public procurement activity in Scotland, based on information contained in individual procurement reports prepared by public bodies.

40 page PDF

391.0 kB

40 page PDF

391.0 kB

Contents
Annual report on procurement activity in Scotland: 2019
Footnotes

40 page PDF

391.0 kB

Footnotes

1. The first reporting period for public bodies was longer than one full financial year. Not all public bodies observe the same financial year.

2. Throughout this document, we refer to 'public bodies' as short-hand for all organisations which are subject to public procurement laws. This includes central government, local government, universities and colleges, health bodies and registered social landlords.

3. Figures based on spend data from over 100 Scottish public bodies and on suppliers that have been classed as commercial organisations or as non‑trade social care providers and with which individual public bodies have spent over £1000 in aggregate in a 12 month period.

4. Using the latest Scottish Government Input-Output Model of the economy.

5. Based on £11.6 billion spend in 2016-17 net of VAT (before tax).

6. 'Economic activity' refers to total output and the impacts relate to the Scottish Economy only, therefore the imports from the rest of the UK and the rest of the world are disregarded. These figures include direct, indirect and induced effects. If there is an increase in final use for a particular industry output, we can assume that there will be an increase in the output of that industry, as producers react to meet the increased use; this is the direct effect. As these producers increase their output, there will also be an increase in use on their suppliers and so on down the supply chain; this is the indirect effect. As a result of the direct and indirect effects the level of household income throughout the economy will increase as a result of increased employment. A proportion of this increased income will be re-spent on final goods and services: this is the induced effect.

7. Dundee City employment: 77,000 (BRES, 2017 figure).

8. Financial and Insurance Activities employment: 84,000 (BRES, 2017 figure).

9. In a few cases, it is not clear whether the figures provided include regulated and non-regulated contracts, or only regulated contracts. In these instances, we have included the data provided for completeness.

10. This includes collaborative agreements and Dynamic Purchasing Systems awarded within the timeframe.

11. Including Scottish Government, Executive agencies, Executive Non-Departmental Public Bodies, Public corporations and Non-Ministerial Offices.

12. 'Making Public Procurement work in and for Europe' – COM(2017) 572 final

13. Scottish Procurement Information Hub is an online tool that allows over 100 Scottish public bodies to examine spend by analysing Accounts Payable data. Spend is that which is with suppliers that have been classed as commercial organisations or as non-trade social care providers and with whom individual public bodies have spent over £1,000 in aggregate in a 12 month period. The Hub does not include spend data for Registered Social Landlords.

14. Source: Businesses in Scotland.

15. Where supplier location and size is known.

16. In many cases, it was unclear whether the data provided related to regulated or non-regulated procurement spend.

17. There are four procurement centres of expertise which between them provide support and guidance to public sector bodies. They are: Scotland Excel for Scotland's local government sector; APUC Limited for Scotland's universities and colleges; NHS National Procurement for health; and the Scottish Government for central government bodies.

18. 'Making Public Procurement work in and for Europe' – COM(2017) 572 final

19. 'Making Public Procurement work in and for Europe' – COM(2017) 572 final

20. https://www.gov.scot/publications/analysis-impact-value-community-benefit-clauses-procurement/

21. Figures based upon conventional printed materials and exclude screen print, promotional items and display materials print. £3.1 million was spent on conventional print in 2017/18, and therefore Scottish SME Printers gained 77% of conventional print spend in that year.

22. A procurement contract can only affect those workers who will be engaged on the delivery of the contract, so it is not possible, as part of a procurement process, to require that suppliers are Accredited Living Wage employers, despite this suppliers are encouraged to consider accreditation.

23. 'Making Public Procurement work in and for Europe' – COM(2017) 572 final

24. Where supplier location and size is known.

25. A new framework agreement for commodities reserved for Supported Businesses was established on 10 December 2018.


Contact

Email: scottishprocurement@gov.scot