Publication - Research and analysis

Town Centre Regeneration: TCRF Case Studies Report

Published: 27 Sep 2011
Part of:
Research
ISBN:
9781780453996

The report presents findings of research undertaken in nine case study areas that received funding from the Town Centre Regeneration Fund (TCRF). The report highlights baseline measures for monitoring town centre regeneration activity relative to each case study. The report is one of four publications produced by this research.

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Contents
Town Centre Regeneration: TCRF Case Studies Report
7 BARRHEAD

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7 BARRHEAD

Context and Background

7.1 Barrhead is located in the north of East Renfrewshire, approximately eight miles southwest of Glasgow. The town has good transport linkages to and from Glasgow and beyond, and retained a population of around 18,000 in 2008, making it the largest town within the local authority area.

7.2 The local economy has suffered from the effects of a decline in employment as a result of a downturn in local industry, including the loss of a number of large employers. This has led to various social, economic and employment challenges within Barrhead and levels of deprivation in the town are notably higher than across the rest of the local authority area.

7.3 The town centre itself is recognised as an area for priority action amongst local policy makers and as such is subject to a range of major regeneration proposals aimed at transforming the town. These include the development of new housing in and around the town centre, the provision of modern business space, a new health centre, and a new Community College. These plans form part of a £100m, ten-year plan to regenerate the town.

7.4 Within this wider context, the Barrhead TCRF project proposes a range of interventions aimed at progressing the town's regeneration. There were originally seven specific projects proposed namely:

  • Internal refurbishment of Barrhead Sports Centre;
  • Improvements to the façade and car park of the Main Street Shopping Centre;
  • Comprehensive modernisation of Council owned shop fronts at 206-228 Main Street;
  • Public realm improvements to complement the new Heath and Social Care Centre;
  • Revamping of the vacant upper floor of the Westbourne Centre;
  • Public realm improvements in Cross Arthurlie Street; and
  • Acquisition and demolition of 55-59 Cross Arthurlie Street to facilitate new mixed residential development.

7.5 The total cost associated with these investments was circa £3.3m, £2.2m of which was requested from the TCRF. The remaining project funding comes from a range of other sources including East Renfrewshire Council, the NHS, and Sportscotland.

Population

7.6 Table 7.1 shows that Barrhead was home to approximately 17,900 people in 2009. This represents a decrease of 2% since 2001. The East Renfrewshire population remained stable over this period and the wider Scottish population increased by 3%.

7.7 61% of the Barrhead population are of working age. This is higher than in East Renfrewshire (59%) and lower than the national average of 63%.

Table 7.1: Population

  Barrhead East Renfrewshire Scotland
Total Population 2009 17,900 89,200 5,194,000
Population Change 2001-09 -2% 0% 3%
% Working Age 2009 61% 59% 63%

Sources: ONS Mid-Year Population Estimates

Age Profile

7.8 Table 7.2 shows that the age structure of the East Renfrewshire population has lower proportions of 16-24 and 25-49 age groups and higher proportions of 0-15, 50-64 and 65+ age groups than the national averages. Compared with East Renfrewshire, the Barrhead population is similar across all age groups, identified by a difference of only 1% higher or lower.

Table 7.2: Age Profile of the Population 2009
(Source: ONS Mid-Year Population Estimates 2009)

Table 7.2: Age Profile of the Population 2009

Labour Market

7.9 Table 7.3 shows the 2010 labour market participation levels (as measured by employment, unemployment and economic inactivity) in East Renfrewshire closely accord with the national average.

7.10 Using the benefit claimant rate as a proxy for labour market participation, labour market participation levels in Barrhead are significantly lower than in East Renfrewshire and lower than the national average.

7.11 In January 2010, 4.9% of all working age residents in the Barrhead area were claiming the benefit, significantly higher than the average of 2.7% for East Renfrewshire but generally in line with the equivalent rate in Scotland.

7.12 Relative to the Scotland, the East Renfrewshire workforce is better qualified. 47% of the East Renfrewshire working age population are educated to degree level, higher than across Scotland as a whole (34%). A lower proportion of the East Renfrewshire working population have no qualifications at all - 10%, compared to 13% for Scotland.

Table 7.3: Labour Market

  Barrhead East Renfrewshire Scotland
Labour Market Participation
Employment Rate N/A 73% 72%
Unemployment Rate N/A 6% 7%
Economic Inactivity Rate N/A 23% 23%
Benefit Claimants
Workless Benefit Claimant Rate 19.1% 9.4% 14.6%
Jobseekers Allowance Claimant Rate 4.9% 2.7% 4.2%
Qualifications of the Working Age Population
% WAP Qualified to Degree Level or Above N/A 47% 34%
% WAP with No Qualifications N/A 10% 13%

7.13 Table 7.4 shows that there were approximately 5,000 jobs in Barrhead in 2008, representing a decrease of 3% since 2004. This was in contrast to the increases across East Renfrewshire and Scotland as a whole (5% and 3% respectively). Sixteen per cent of employee jobs in Barrhead are based within the financial & business services sector. This is higher than the East Renfrewshire average (13%) but lower than the national average (19%).

7.14 There were 400 business located in the town in 2008 which was a significant decrease (-10%) from 2004. This contrasts sharply with a 6% increase in East Renfrewshire and an 8% increase in Scotland over the same period.

7.15 When compared with the East Renfrewshire and national averages, Barrhead (two businesses per 100) has a lower business density rate than East Renfrewshire (3) and the Scotland average (4).

Table 7.4: Local Economy

  Barrhead East Renfrewshire Scotland
Employment
Number of Jobs 2008 5,000 18,200 2,420,400
% Change 2004-08 -3% 5% 3%
% Jobs financial & business services 16% 13% 19%
Business Base
Number of Businesses (2008) 400 2,400 181,500
% Change 2004-08 -10% 6% 8%
Businesses per 100 Head of Population 2 3 4

Source: Annual Business Inquiry & ONS Mid-Year Population Estimates

7.16 Table 7.5 shows a breakdown of all jobs by industry in Barrhead, East Renfrewshire and Scotland. The public sector is by far the largest employer in Barrhead and accounts for a larger share compared with East Renfrewshire and Scotland. Construction in Barrhead accounts for some 14% of employment, higher than the equivalent rates for East Renfrewshire and Scotland - 9% and 6% respectively.

7.17 The percentage of manufacturing activity in Barrhead at 3% is lower than the East Renfrewshire average of 5% and the national level of 9%.

Table 7.5: Employment

  Barrhead East Renfrewshire Scotland
Total Number of Jobs 2008 5,000 18,200 2,420,400
% Agriculture & Energy 0% 0% 3%
% Manufacturing 3% 5% 9%
% Construction 14% 9% 6%
% Retail & Catering 18% 26% 22%
% Transport & Communications 4% 3% 5%
% Financial & Business Services 16% 13% 19%
% Public Sector 41% 35% 30%
% Other Services 4% 9% 5%

Source: Annual Business Inquiry ( ABI)

Business Base

7.18 Figure 7.6 shows the profile of the business base in terms of sizeband in the local area, relative to East Renfrewshire and national data. It shows that the vast majority of businesses across each of the areas employ between 1-10 people. In Barrhead, these employers account for a slightly lower share of employment (78%), when compared with East Renfrewshire (87%) and Scotland (81%).

7.19 On the other hand, businesses in Barrhead with between 11 and 49 employees account for around 17% of all businesses in the area - higher than the East Renfrewshire and national averages at 10% and 14% respectively. In 2008, 4% of businesses in Barrhead employed between 50 and 199 employees, higher than the averages for East Renfrewshire (2%) and Scotland (3%). In Barrhead, just 1% of all businesses employ more than 200 staff and this is similar to the Scottish rate.

Table 7.6: Businesses by Sizeband 2008
(Source: Annual Business Inquiry ( ABI))

Table 7.6: Businesses by Sizeband 2008

Tourism

7.20 This section provides an overview of the Barrhead tourist market, providing some assessment of the recent performance at an East Renfrewshire and national level. Unfortunately it is not possible to use the data zone definition to look at the tourism market in Barrhead as the numbers involved are too small to be disclosed. Therefore this section uses data for the five 2003 CAS wards. (See Appendix)

7.21 Table 7.7 shows that the local area's tourism sector employed around 400 people in 2008, representing a dramatic downturn of 29% since 2004. This significant decline compares with an increase across East Renfrewshire (13%) and Scotland (5%). There were around 40 tourism businesses/workplaces in the local area in 2008 - a decrease of around 4% since 2004. This decline contrasts with an increase of 4% in both the East Renfrewshire and national average.

Table 7.7: Tourism

Tourism Employment & Workplaces Barrhead East Renfrewshire Scotland
Employees (2008) 400 2,200 215,000
Change in Employees 2004-2008 -29% 13% 5%
Workplaces 40 200 19,500
Change in Workplaces 2004-2008 -4% 4% 4%

Source: Annual Business Inquiry ( ABI)

Baseline Measures

Table 7.8: Barrhead Town Centre: Baseline Measures

Measure Specific Data Source Comment
Economic Activity
Recent Investment List indicating value of new development, expansions and improvements in the 12 months to Dec 2009
Gross town centre retail floor space: 4,112 sq m
ERC Regeneration
Retail Capacity Assessment (2005)
See Table 7.9
Previous RCA was commissioned to assess potential to grow Barrhead town centre and to inform policy. No current plans to repeat this.
No of Businesses Independent retailers: 65
Franchise retailers: 10
Industrial/commercial businesses in the town centre:7
Number of complimentary/leisure businesses: 30
Number of other businesses ( e.g. Lawyers, Banks, Real Estate): 28
Number of industrial/commercial businesses in Industrial area north of Barrhead: 20
Town Centre Health Check (March 2008 Survey) by Hall Aitken. Available from ERC Regeneration. The next survey will be March 2011, and every 2 years after.
No of jobs 4,451 IDBR Data ERC Economic Development
Retail performance
Rental levels/yields No information on rental yields to date. Likely to be undertaken by ERC ERC will investigate the most cost effective way of collecting this in the future.
Vacancy levels 4.4% of retail ground floor units vacant Town Centre Health Check (March 2008 Survey) by Hall Aitken. Available from ERC Regeneration. The next survey will be March 2011, and every 2 years after.
Range of shops/ services Number of independent retailers: 65
Number of franchise retailers: 10
Town Centre Health Check (March 2008 Survey) by Hall Aitken. Available from ERC Regeneration. The next survey will be March 2011, and every 2 years after.
Other; Retail Ranking Retail ranking 2008 1123 out of 1256 Experian Retail Rankings 2007, via Town Centre Health Check The next survey will be March 2011, and every 2 years after.
Other: Retail Turnover Convenience retail turnover: £17.64 million Retail Capacity Assessment (2005) , via Town Centre Health Check The next survey will be March 2011, and every 2 years after.
Use and Accessibility
Parking Parking spaces : 410 public & 416 tied to retail/train station;
Disabled spaces: 33;
Dedicated cycle parking areas: 2.
DTZ Regeneration Framework Survey (2005), via Town Centre Health Check The next survey will be March 2011, and every 2 years after.
Pedestrian Flow Weekend Flow: 3 locations; 30 mins two times a day
Midweek Flow: 3 locations; 30 mins two times a day (different times from weekend)
Town Centre Health Check (March 2008 Survey) by Hall Aitken. Available from ERC Regeneration. Annual surveys planned. (Same locations, same week number, same times during the day.)
Other: Main Street Crossings Crossings where pedestrians are granted right of way: 2 Town Centre Health Check (March 2008 Survey) by Hall Aitken. Available from ERC Regeneration. The next survey will be March 2011, and every 2 years after.
Other: Disabled Access % of retail/leisure units with level access: 60% Town Centre Health Check (March 2008 Survey) by Hall Aitken. Available from ERC Regeneration. The next survey will be March 2011, and every 2 years after.
Other: Rail Usage Number of passenger entries and exits in 2005/6: 511,073 Office for Rail Regulation (2006), via Town Centre Health Check Usage data will be collected to feed into next Town Centre Health Check in March 2011.
Safety
Other: Crime Rates Shoplifting Shoplifting offences in the 6 months up to end of September 2007: 30 ('down from 52') Strathclyde Police, via Town Centre Health Check Collected biannually
(to feed into next Town Centre Health Check in March 2011.)
Other: Crime Rates Reported incidents per household:
Auchenback: 0.39;
Arthurlie: 0.12;
Dunterlie: 0.29;
Neilston: 1.12
Strathclyde Police, via Town Centre Health Check Collected biannually
(to feed into next Town Centre Health Check in March 2011.)
Other: CCTV cameras CCTV cameras providing public coverage: 6 Town Centre Health Check (March 2008 Survey) by Hall Aitken. Available from ERC Regeneration. The next survey will be March 2011, and every 2 years after.

Linkages & Catalyst for New Investment

7.22 The public realm improvements at Cross Arthurlie Street have acted as a catalyst for other investment in shop fronts. It is anticipated the development of some of the gap sites in the town centre will be accelerated.

7.23 Tim Vaughan of Moorgarth Properties, owners of the Westbourne Business Centre confirmed that TCRF funding had played a pivotal role in the refurbishment of the building. Moorgarth Properties purchased the site in 2004. Towards the end of the Council lease, Moorgarth considered two options: redecoration or a more comprehensive redevelopment of the site. The latter was the desirable option as there were no modern start-up units available to rent in the Barrhead area, but full-scale refurbishment was not financially feasible as the rental income would have been low. Most of the feasibility work had already been done which confirmed that that the redevelopment option was not financially viable, and therefore the project met the terms of the grant application.

7.24 Tim Vaughan confirmed that the refurbishment would not have been possible without TCRF funding. One of the conditions of the funding was to provide a lift at a cost of £35,000 to ensure the building was fully DDA compliant. This increased the capital cost from a budget of £120,000 to over £150,000 and the first tranche of monies has been received. Four tenants are now in place since the centre opened in early April 2010. Ultimately the success of the investment is dependent on the level of uptake of the units.

Project Specific Measures

7.25 A town centre health check commissioned by East Renfrewshire Council was undertaken for Barrhead by Hall Aitken in March 2008. The health check has provided the majority of the baseline data in Table 7.8 above. Subsequent health checks were not carried out in 2009 & 2010, however there is the intention to do so in 2011.

7.26 The Project performance indicators and the various sources are summarised in Table 7.9 below.

Table 7.9: Barrhead Main Street Shops: Performance Indicators

Objectives Performance Indicators Gathered/available: Before & After Source
To upgrade the shop fronts including canopy, new lighting, new fascia, signage, paint and retiling.
To increase localised demand for services by creating a more pleasant and accessible environment.
To increase footfall to provide opportunities for economic growth and expansion to form existing and new businesses, bringing employment opportunities into the area.
Number of shop units modernised. TCRF Data
Vitality indicators:
- Ground floor vacancy rate
- Number of industrial/ commercial businesses
Viability indicators:
- Town centre floor space - gross
- Level of convenience retail turnover
- Independent and franchise retailers
- Complementary/leisure businesses
- Increased footfall
Town Centre Health Check
(Hall Aitken consultants)
Relative retail offer
Vitality index
Experian Retail Rankings 2007

Table 7.10: Barrhead Main Street Public Realm: Performance Indicators

Objectives Performance Indicators Gathered/available: Before & After Source
To provide road, footway, lighting and landscaping improvements
To increase localised demand for services by creating a more pleasant and accessible environment.
To increase footfall to provide opportunities for economic growth and expansion from existing and new businesses, bringing employment opportunities into the area.
Road surface and footway upgrade areas (sq m) TCRF Contract
Accessibility indicators:
- Main Street crossings where pedestrians are granted right of way
- Dedicated cycling parking provision
- Disabled access: % of retail/leisure units with level access
Increased footfall
Town Centre Health Check
(Hall Aitken consultants)

Table 7.11: Barrhead Main Street Shopping Centre: Performance Indicators

Objectives Performance Indicators Gathered/available: Before & After Source
To improve the shopping centre façade and car park
To increase localised demand for services by creating a more pleasant and accessible environment.
To increase footfall to provide opportunities for economic growth and expansion from existing and new businesses, bringing employment opportunities into the area.
- Re-cladding of façade
- Renovation of existing car park
- Renovation of interior to create additional retail and office floor space (all sq m)
TCRF Contract
Vitality indicators:
- Ground floor vacancy rate
- Number of industrial/commercial businesses
Viability indicators:
- Independent and franchise retailers
- Complementary/leisure businesses
- Footfall
Town Centre Health Check
(Hall Aitken consultants)
Viability indicators:
- Town centre gross floor space
- Level of convenience retail turnover
Retail Capacity Assessment
(undertaken on a two yearly basis; last one was 2010)
Accessibility indicators:
- Car parking spaces
- Disabled parking spaces
Undertaken in 2005 by DTZ

Notes

Indicators that ERC need to measure in the future are indicated in italics.

Table 7.12: Westbourne Centre: Performance Indicators

Objectives Performance Indicators Gathered/available: Before & After Source
To provide flexible office space within refurbished building
To satisfy unmet demand for such facilities
Monitoring undertaken at a strategic level as part of SOA performance indicators:
- Area refurbished & available (sq m)
- Take up of office space
- Quarterly register of activity provided by Moorgarth Ltd
TCRF Data
- Number of industrial/commercial businesses Town Centre Health Check
(Hall Aitken consultants)

Table 7.13: Cross Arthurlie Street Public Realm and 55-59 Cross Arthurlie Street: Performance Indicators

Objectives Performance Indicators Gathered/available: Before & After Source
To increase access to and localised demand for services thus promoting economic and employment growth which will benefit both businesses and the wider community
To recreate a sustainable mixed residential and retail centre and create construction jobs
- Upgrade of road surface and footways and installation of street furniture, trees and lighting. Area upgraded (sq m)
Acquisition and demolition of vacant building and promotion of site for mixed use development
TCRF Data
Vitality indicators:
- Ground floor vacancy rate
- Number of industrial/commercial businesses
Viability indicators:
- Independent and franchise retailers
- Complementary/leisure businesses
- Increased footfall
Town Centre Health Check
(Hall Aitken consultants)
Viability indicators:
- Town centre gross floor space
- Level of convenience retail turnover
Retail Capacity Assessment
(undertaken on a two yearly basis; last one was 2010)
Relative retail offer
Vitality index
Experian Retail Rankings 2007

Notes: Key performance indicators have been developed and included in both the Single Outcome Agreement ( SOA) and Operational Development Plan. These indicators have also been used to monitor the performance of the regeneration proposals and components.

Addressing Theory of Change

7.27 The table below summarises the review of outputs and outcomes using the emerging Theory of Change (public realm, accessibility & townscape and business, commercial and retail space models).

Table 7.14: Barrhead Main Street Shops: Project Specific Measures
(Three Projects)

Objectives/ Activities Outputs Short Term Outcomes: 2011 Interim Term Outcomes: 2013 Longer Term Outcomes: 2015+ Measure In Place
To upgrade the shop fronts including canopy, new lighting, new fascia, signage, paint and retiling. Modern-isation of 12 shop front units
Upgrade 100m of road surface and footway
Re-clad 176 m of façade.
Renovation of existing car park.
Anticipated internal refurbishment of Shopping Centre may not happen
Enhanced physical & visual appearance.
As a result of TCRF investment 2 shop front grants have been awarded ( ERC Grant £1,107 & private investment £1,107).
Has resulted in private investment of £35,673 levered in.
To increase localised demand for services by creating a more pleasant and accessible environment.
To increase footfall to provide opportunities for economic growth
Opportunities for economic growth and expansion from existing and new businesses, bringing employment opportunities into the area. Yes re number of shop fronts improved.
Annual East Renfrewshire Citizens Panel (next due in May 2011) will include a question relating to level of satisfaction about Barrhead town centre and neighbourhood regeneration.
No other qualitative or perception surveys programmed.
Engagement of local businesses
Well designed & maintained streets and public spaces (including parking)
Training project to undertake part of work
To provide road, footway, lighting and landscaping improvements
To increase localised demand for services by creating a more pleasant and accessible environment.
To increase footfall to provide opportunities for economic growth and expansion from existing and new businesses, bringing employment opportunities into the area
Increased spend on local contractor, supplies & initial jobs related to regeneration work (an outcome?)
In-house training project for some of the external improvement work has resulted in 7-10 training places.
Sustained employment in local businesses
Increased range, quality & competitiveness of local retail & businesses
Increased income for local businesses
Increased footfall & local spend
Increased awareness, perceived value & use of local retail & businesses by residents and visitors
Enhanced sense of safety/security
Improved employability amongst local residents
Increased inward investment for retail (& other sectors) & sustained job opportunities
Sustained use of local retail businesses
Increased social interaction
More satisfactory pride in local area
Leverage of additional funds
Increased environmental sustainability & reduced pollution
Increased community inclusion & cohesion & improved social capital
Increased percentage of working age in employment
Only for some of the quantitative outcomes and not for any of the qualitative/perceived outcomes.
Outcomes measured:
- Initial jobs related to regeneration outcome
- Range of local retail & businesses
- Increased footfall
- Increased spend (turnover)/income/use
- Percentage of working age in employment
Remainder of outcomes are not measured in the sources identified in Table 7.9 examples:
- Spend on local contractor and supplies
- Employment in local businesses
- Quality & competitiveness of local retail & businesses
- Awareness, perceived value of local retail & businesses
- Sense of safety/security
- Employability of local residents/ sustained job opportunities
- Increased social interaction

- Pride in local area
- Environmental sustainability & reduced pollution

- Community inclusion & cohesion & improved social capital

Notes

Indicators that ERC need to measure in the future are indicated in italics.

Table 7.15: Westbourne Centre: Project Specific Measures

Objectives/ Activities Outputs Short Term Outcomes: 2011 Interim Term Outcomes: 2013 Longer Term Outcomes: 2015+ Measure In Place
To provide flexible office space within refurbished building
To satisfy unmet demand for such facilities
Refurbish 567 sq m of the upper floor of the building and create a flexible working space of up to 15 business units. Has resulted in additional funds of £106,755 levered in. Increased inward investment: new businesses attracted/started up & sustained job opportunities
Sustained use of local retail businesses
Leverage of additional funds
Opportunities for economic growth and expansion from existing and new businesses, bringing employment opportunities into the area Yes: Number of business occupying space
Number of jobs created

Table 7.16: Cross Arthurlie Street Public Realm and 55-59 Cross Arthurlie Street: Project Specific Measures

Objectives/ Activities Outputs Short Term Outcomes: 2011 Interim Term Outcomes: 2013 Longer Term Outcomes: 2015+ Measure In Place
To provide road, footway, lighting and landscaping improvements Upgrade 524m of road surface and footways.
Install street furniture, trees and lighting.
Has resulted in additional private investment of £235,000 levered in.
Acquire and demolish vacant building and promote site for 1903 sq m site of mixed use development.
As a result of TCRF investment 3 shop front grants have been awarded ( ERC Grant £9,800 & private investment £11,800); a further 2 are being negotiated ( ERC Grant £7,000 & private investment £7,000) To increase localised demand for services by creating a more pleasant and accessible environment.
To increase footfall to provide opportunities for economic growth
To increase access to and localised demand for services thus promoting economic and employment growth which will benefit both businesses and the wider community
To recreate a sustainable mixed residential and retail centre and create construction jobs
See Table 7.14 above

Progress: Jan/Early Feb 2011

7.28 'Better Barrhead', as originally conceived, was a programme of seven projects within Barrhead town centre. These projects were not developed specifically for the TCRF submission; they had their roots in the DTZ Pieda Report "Better Barrhead Framework and Town Centre Master Plan" (2007); the Barrhead Regeneration Framework and Town Centre Master Plan (updated Feb 2008); and the Barrhead Town Centre Urban Design Framework. Therefore, significant project development work had already been made in taking the projects forward at the time of the TCRF application.

7.29 The original seven projects were reduced to six as the proposed internal modifications to Barrhead Sports Centre were not approved by the Scottish Government. The six component projects were:

  • Main Street Shops: Comprehensive modernisation of Council owned shop fronts at 206-228 Main Street;
  • Main Street Public Realm: Public realm improvements to complement the new Health and Social Care Centre;
  • Main Street Shopping Centre: Improvements to the façade and car park of the Main Street Shopping Centre;
  • Westbourne Business Centre: Revamping of the vacant upper floor to provide flexible office space;
  • Cross Arthurlie Street Public Realm: Public realm improvements to create a sustainable retail centre;
  • Cross Arthurlie Street: Acquisition and demolition of 55-59 Cross Arthurlie Street to facilitate new mixed residential development.

7.30 The TCRF capital allocation was £1.408m. By November 2010 the total TCRF spend was £1.247m.

7.31 The Main Street Shops Upgrade is complete.

7.32 The Main Street Public Realm contract was due to start on-site in the second week in June 2010 and be completed in mid September 2010. However this was delayed due to bad weather and utilities services issues and will now be completed in March 2011. The improvements will decrease the severance caused by the dual carriageway, create a more pedestrian friendly area and include on-street parking.

7.33 The Main Street Shopping Centre Upgrade had been delayed but is now completed and final invoices are awaited.

7.34 The Westbourne Business Centre was completed in early April 2010 and has levered in more private funding than initially anticipated. The office suites which range in size from 150 sq ft up to 4,000 sq ft are available on flexible leases from one month upwards. A total of four units have been leased with a further two under offer. A new web site to promote the units has been set up.

7.35 The public realm improvements at Cross Arthurlie Street are complete. The modernisation of the shop fronts at 206-228 Main Street including new canopies and shop signs has also been completed. The improvements to the Main Street Shopping Centre and car park were to be completed by the end of September.

7.36 The project at 55-59 Cross Arthurlie Street was underway in May 2010 when the former gym building was demolished. Joint marketing terms have now been agreed with the owner of the adjacent site and the wider site is being marketed by an independent agent and being actively promoted via ERC developers' forum. The aim of securing ground floor retail may need to be altered due to market conditions despite interest from a neighbourhood shopping operator.

Conclusions

7.37 The six TCRF projects were not developed specifically for the TCRF submission and they had their roots in a number of earlier strategy documents.

7.38 The establishment of a cross-departmental delivery group, which operated at a senior level within the Council, was particularly helpful in developing and delivering the projects in the tight timescale.

7.39 There is robust and consistent town centre data available through the Council including a 2008 Health Check that is being updated in March 2011.

7.40 In Cross Arthurlie Street in particular the completion of the TCRF project has led to a small group of business getting together to proactively explore proposals for joint marketing, shop front improvements and introducing a farmers' market. These kind of proactive business-led initiatives are also expected to progress in Main Street. In the longer term, East Renfrewshire Council intend to explore the possibilities of establishing a Business Improvement District based on this business interest.

7.41 The case study contact accepted the usefulness of the Theory of Change approach and has used this to prepare a more robust monitoring and evaluation framework based on clear project specific measures.

7.42 As far as the Barrhead contact is concerned the main issues arising in the TCRF project have been:

  • Impressed by the private sector business response, particularly in Cross Arthurlie Street;
  • Pleased with the 'light touch' reporting arrangement to Scottish Government;
  • Disappointed that a more radical reconfiguration of the Shopping Centre was not possible.

Case Study Interview Details

Main Contact Name Gillian McNamara
Position Principal Projects and Programmes Officer (Regeneration)
Economic Development and Regeneration Service
Organisation East Renfrewshire Council ( ERC)
Phone Number / Mobile 0141 577 3044
E-Mail gillian.mcnamara@eastrenfrewshire.gov.uk
Other Contacts:  
Name Tim Vaughan
Organisation Moorgarth Properties, owners of Westbourne Business Centre