Publication - Research and analysis

Town Centre Regeneration: TCRF Case Studies Report

Published: 27 Sep 2011
Part of:
Research
ISBN:
9781780453996

The report presents findings of research undertaken in nine case study areas that received funding from the Town Centre Regeneration Fund (TCRF). The report highlights baseline measures for monitoring town centre regeneration activity relative to each case study. The report is one of four publications produced by this research.

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Contents
Town Centre Regeneration: TCRF Case Studies Report
6 GOVAN

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6 GOVAN

Context and Background

6.1 Govan is a district of Glasgow, located approximately three miles from the city centre and located on the south bank of the River Clyde. Lying north of the M8, Govan is well served by transport links with good road, bus and underground network links to the rest of the city. In 2008, the area had a population of 66,100 [9].

6.2 Govan's history is indelibly linked to its shipyards, with the area at the heart of the worldwide shipbuilding industry in the late 1800s and the first part of the 20th century. However, long-term decline of the industry on the Clyde following the post-war period has drastically reduced shipbuilding within the area and today there is just one operating shipyard located within Govan [10]. This long-term industrial decline has been one in a range of factors which have contributed to significant levels of economic, physical and social deprivation in the area over recent decades.

6.3 In response, concerted efforts are being made by local policy makers in an attempt to arrest the decline in the town and surrounding areas of Govan. In this context, key town centre regeneration projects in the area are taking place within the framework of the Central Govan Action Plan ( CGAP) and the Govan Townscape Heritage Initiative ( THI).

6.4 The CGAP is a ten-year, £120m programme, co-ordinating investment in a range of regeneration activities including public realm improvements, historic building renewal, new mixed tenure housing, shop front improvements, community and leisure facilities, and landscape and infrastructure improvements. Forming part of the CGAP, the THI provides grant-based funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund, the aim of which is to regenerate conservation areas in towns that have suffered from acute social and economic problems.

6.5 The successful Govan TCRF application sought funding for two specific projects which from part of the CGAP and THI investment programmes. These were:

  • Roof repair works to the Pearce Institute, a Category A listed community and landmark building at Govan Cross. This would be the initial stage of planned restoration, with the full schedule of planned improvements ultimately expected to improve the building's viability and sustainability as a community and business resource.
  • Public realm improvements at three key sites at Govan Cross - namely the square and forecourts of both the shopping centre and underground and bus station. These improvements are primarily aimed towards improving the attractiveness, accessibility and cleanliness of the Govan Cross area.

6.6 Collectively, these two projects amount to investment of nearly £4.6m in the Govan area, around £3.3m of which had already been secured from other sources prior to the TCRF application being lodged. The remaining £1.3m of TCRF monies sought was therefore intended to make up the funding shortfall.

Population

6.7 Table 6.1 shows that Govan was home to approximately 66,600 people in 2009. This represents an increase of 1% since 2001. The Glasgow City population increased by 2% over this period and the wider Scottish population increased by 3%.

6.8 Seventy per cent of the Govan population are of working age. This is higher than both the Glasgow City and national averages of 67% and 63% respectively.

Table 6.1: Population

Govan Glasgow Scotland
Total Population 2009 66,600 588,500 5,194,000
Population Change 2001-09 1% 2% 3%
% Working Age 2009 70% 67% 63%

Sources: ONS Mid-Year Population Estimates

Age Profile

6.9 Figure 6.2 shows that the age structure of the Glasgow City population has higher proportions of 16-24 and 25-59 age groups and smaller proportions of 50-64 and 65+ age groups than the national averages. Compared with the Glasgow City and national averages, the Govan population is characterised by a significantly higher proportion of 25-49 age group and slightly lower shares of residents who are in the 50-64 and 65+ age groups.

6.10 The analysis also reveals that people over the age of 50 account for around 27% of the Govan population, which is lower than the Glasgow City (30%) and Scotland (36%) averages. The over 65 proportion is 12% - this is lower than both Glasgow City (14%) and Scotland (17%).

Figure 6.2: Age Profile of the Population 2009
(Source: ONS Mid-Year Population Estimates 2009)

Figure 6.2: Age Profile of the Population 2009

Labour Market

6.11 Table 6.3 shows the 2010 labour market participation levels (as measured by employment, unemployment and economic inactivity) in Glasgow City are below the national average.

6.12 Using the benefit claimant rate as a proxy [11] for labour market participation, it can be assumed that labour market participation levels are similar across Glasgow as whole, and lower than the national average.

6.13 In January 2010, 5.8% of all working age residents in the Govan area were claiming the benefit, generally in line with the equivalent rate for Glasgow City and higher than that of the Scotland average (4.2%).

6.14 Relative to Scotland, the Glasgow City workforce is less well qualified, with 32% of the Glasgow City working age population educated to degree level, lower than across Scotland as a whole (34%). Furthermore, a higher proportion of the Glasgow City working population have no qualifications at all - 20%, compared to 13% for Scotland.

Table 6.3: Labour Market

Govan Glasgow Scotland
Labour Market Participation
Employment Rate N/A 62% 72%
Unemployment Rate N/A 10% 7%
Economic Inactivity Rate N/A 31% 23%
Benefit Claimants
Workless Benefit Claimant Rate 19.9% 22.1% 14.6%
Jobseekers Allowance Claimant Rate 5.8% 6.0% 4.2%
Qualifications of the Working Age Population
% WAP Qualified to Degree Level or Above N/A 32% 34%
% WAP with No Qualifications N/A 20% 13%

6.15 Table 6.4 shows that there were approximately 57,100 jobs in Govan in 2008, representing an increase of 6% since 2004. This was slightly higher than the rate of increase across Glasgow City as whole (5%) and higher than the growth of 3% across Scotland as a whole. Eighteen per cent of employee jobs in Govan are based within the financial & business services sector. This is slightly lower than the Glasgow City average (28%) and similar to the national average (19%).

6.16 There were 3,200 business located in Govan in 2008 which was 5% increase from 2004. This rate of increase was higher than the Glasgow City (2%) and lower than the Scotland (8%) increases over the same period.

6.17 When compared with the Glasgow City and national averages, Govan (five businesses per 100) has a higher business density rate than Glasgow City (4) and the Scotland average (4).

Table 6.4: Local Economy

Govan Glasgow Scotland
Employment
Number of Jobs 2008 57,100 413,500 2,420,400
% Change 2004-08 6% 5% 3%
% Jobs financial & business services 18% 28% 19%
Business Base
Number of Businesses (2008) 3,200 20,800 181,500
% Change 2004-08 5% 2% 8%
Businesses per 100 Head of Population 5 4 4

Source: Annual Business Inquiry & ONS Mid-Year Population Estimates

6.18 Table 6.5 shows a breakdown of all jobs by industry in Govan, Glasgow City and Scotland. The service sector is by far the largest employer in Govan and accounts for a larger share of total employment when compared to Glasgow City and Scotland. For example, retail & catering accounts for 27% of all jobs in Govan, compared with 20% in Glasgow City and 22% across Scotland as a whole. Public Sector jobs in Govan account for some 30% of employment. This is similar to the equivalent rates for Glasgow City and Scotland - 31% and 30% respectively.

6.19 The percentage of manufacturing activity in Govan at 5% is similar to the Glasgow City average with the sector accounting for only 5% of all jobs in 2008. At a national level, the sector accounts for a larger share of jobs (9%).

Table 6.5: Employment

Govan Glasgow Scotland
Total Number of Jobs 2008 57,100 413,500 2,420,400
% Agriculture & Energy 0% 1% 3%
% Manufacturing 5% 5% 9%
% Construction 7% 4% 6%
% Retail & Catering 27% 20% 22%
% Transport & Communications 5% 5% 5%
% Financial & Business Services 18% 28% 19%
% Public Sector 30% 31% 30%
% Other Services 8% 5% 5%

Source: Annual Business Inquiry ( ABI)

Business Base

6.20 Figure 6.6 shows the profile of the business base in terms of sizeband in the local area, relative to Glasgow City and national data. It shows that the vast majority of businesses across each of the areas employ between 1-10 people. In Govan, these employers account for a similar share of employment (77%), when compared with Glasgow City (77%) and Scotland (81%).

6.21 On the other hand, businesses in Govan with between 11 and 49 employees account for around 18% of all businesses in the area - similar to the Glasgow City average but lower than the national average of 14%. In 2008 there were 5% of businesses in Govan which employed between 50 and 199 or more than 200 employees. In Glasgow City, 5% of businesses employ between 50 and 199 employees - higher than the equivalent Scottish rate. In Govan and Glasgow City just 1% of all businesses employ more than 200 staff and again this is similar to the Scottish rate.

Figure 6.6: Businesses by Sizeband 2008
(Source: Annual Business Inquiry ( ABI))

Figure 6.6: Businesses by Sizeband 2008

Tourism

6.22 This section provides an overview of the Govan tourist market, providing some assessment of the recent performance at a Glasgow City and national level.

6.23 Table 6.7 shows that the local area's tourism sector based on the 2003 ten CAS wards employed around 3,700 people in 2008, representing growth of 6% since 2004. This rate of growth was faster than across Glasgow City (0%) and Scotland (5%). There were around 300 tourism businesses/workplaces in the local area in 2008 - a decrease of around 2% since 2004. This rate of decline was less than the Glasgow City average but was outpaced by the national average of 4%.

Table 6.7: Tourism

Tourism Employment & Workplaces Govan Glasgow Scotland
Employees (2008) 3,700 30,000 215,000
Change in Employees 2004-2008 6% 0% 5%
Workplaces 300 2,100 19,500
Change in Workplaces 2004-2008 -2% -6% 4%

Source: Annual Business Inquiry ( ABI)

Town Centre

Table 6.8: Town Centre Baseline Measures

Measure Specific Data Source Comment
Economic Activity
Recent Investment £67.4M in 502 housing units between 2007 and 2010 GSWRA
No of Businesses 42 in 2008 GCCDRS Economic & Social Indicators Govan TC Data Zone
No of jobs 252 FT 144 PT 396 GCCDRS Economic & Social Indicators Govan TC Data Zone
Retail Performance
Rental levels Not available
Vacancy levels 29 or 23% of total GCCDRS
Range of shops/services Comparison: 20
Convenience:21
Service: 58
Vacant: 29
Total: 128
GCCDRS
Use and Accessibility
Parking 25 Jan 2011: 300 cars parked in Govan Cross Area. CGAP

Maps

Linkages & Catalyst for New Investment

6.24 Although the TCRF funding was a minor funder in the restoration costs of the Pearce Institute, as there was a shortfall, the TCRF funding was crucial to the project going ahead. Anne McChlery, Director, Glasgow Building Preservation Trust, who is key partner on the Pearce Institute project, highlighted firstly the historic, architectural and cultural significance of the landmark building and secondly the 'pivotal nature of TCRF funding for the roof repairs'.

6.25 Anne McChlery pointed out that progress at the Pearce Institute should have a 'galvanising' effect on regeneration of the wider town centre and possibly accelerate ambitious plans for Old Govan Parish Church as a visitor attraction, new river crossing to the relocated Transport Museum and strengthen links to the BBC/ STV at Pacific Quay and possibly the investment at the Southern General Hospital. David Herring, Project Consultant for Rockspring Hanover Property Unit Trust (owners of Govan Shopping Centre), pointed out that TCRF funding was 'timely' in helping to maintain investment and stabilise the Shopping Centre at a difficult time in the recession and help convince new occupiers to take space.

Project Specific Measures

6.26 The project performance indicators that have been identified and the various sources are summarised in Table 6.9 below.

Table 6.9: Project: Govan Cross Public Realm: Performance Indicators

Objectives Performance Indicators Gathered/available: Before & After Source
To create an attractive, vibrant and successful space that is well used and valued by local people and visitors alike, and promotes community and investor confidence. Govan Cross should have a visually cohesive appearance using traditional materials to reflect its Conservation Area status. See outputs on table 6.12 below for specific activities Increase footfall GXSC management statistics
Increased retailers' turnover Retailers' survey
Reduced business leakage GCCDRS City Plan Team
Increased units in retail use GCCDRS City Plan Team
Improved visitor perception of town centre GCC City Plan Physical Environmental quality rating
Improved residents' perception of town centre Place making Scores June 2008 Annual street survey
Increased events and opportunities to socialise at Govan Cross Survey of events

Table 6.10: Project: Pearce Institute Re-roofing: Performance Indicators

Objectives Performance Indicators Gathered/available: Before & After Source
To make the Pearce Institute wind and water tight, improving both the quality of the space and the financial viability of the organisation through saved energy costs and preserving the building for future generations to enjoy. Increased footfall PI visitor numbers
200/week in 2009 600/week in 2010 Café Pearce visitor numbers
Stabilised/increased rental income for the Pearce Institute PI Business Plan
Stabilised/increased lets/use of Pearce Institute PI Business Plan
Improved visitor perception of Pearce Institute Average satisfaction rating very good PI visitor survey

Addressing Theory of Change

6.27 The table below summarises the review of outputs and outcomes using the emerging Theory of Change (public realm, accessibility and townscape model).

Table 6.11: Govan Town Centre: Project Specific Measures - Pearce Institute

Objectives/ Activities Outputs Short Term Outcomes: 2011 Interim Term Outcomes: 2013 Longer Term Outcomes: 2015+ Measure In Place
To make the Pearce Institute wind and water tight, improving both the quality of the space and the financial viability of the organisation through saved energy costs and preserving the building for future generations to enjoy. Area of roof fully restored on programme
Rainwater goods refurbished or replaced
Stonework top chimneys repaired
Floodlighting scheme installed
Solar Panels installed
Improve the sense of optimism in the Pearce Institute and Central Govan's regeneration
Improve quality of lettable space
Stabilised/increased rental income for the Pearce Institute
Early improvements in the financial viability of the Pearce Institute
Improve the financial viability of the Pearce Institute - lowered energy and maintenance costs
Increased footfall
Increase number of events & profitability
Preserving the building for future generations to enjoy Yes via plans/specifications: contractor Monitoring visitor numbers
Yes via repeated visitor /user surveys
Improvements in finances via annual business plan updates/ accounts
Architectural features repaired including Leaded windows Plaster work reinstated in Macleod hall & tiered seating removed Areas (sq m) improved Improved visitor perception of Pearce Institute
Increased use of Macleod Hall
Preserving the building for future generations to enjoy Yes as above
Visitor/user perception surveys
Number of new entrant jobs Number confirmed Yes but longer term tracking of individuals' progress will be required
Number of apprenticeships Number apprenticeships confirmed Number still in employment As above
Number of new entrant qualifications Number confirmed Number in employment As above
Number of work experience placements Number confirmed Number still in employment As above
Number of lifelong learning opportunities for existing staff Number confirmed

Table 6.12: Govan Town Centre: Project Specific Measures - Govan Cross Shopping Centre & Underground Forecourt

Objectives/ Activities Outputs Short Term Outcomes: 2011 Interim Term Outcomes: 2013 Longer Term Outcomes: 2015+ Measure In Place
To create an attractive, vibrant and successful space that is well used and valued by local people and visitors alike and promote community and investor confidence. Govan Cross should have a visually cohesive appearance. Area of new paving installed
New street and amenity lighting: area
New seating/ benches: number
New bins, cycle racks and bollards: number
Engraved stone work
Increased attractiveness, comfort and sociability of the space Govan Cross should have a visually cohesive appearance using traditional materials to reflect its Conservation Area status Improved residents and visitors perceptions
Community and investor confidence.
New business relocations/start ups & existing business growth
Increase in jobs
Repeated: residents & visitors perception survey
Repeated:
units in retail use & retailers turnover survey
Increased sense of cohesion for Govan Cross between The Square, Water Row and Underground sites Increase footfall As above Yes
Footfall survey
Increased footfall and profitability of shops Increased retailers' turnover As above Not specific:
Business Turnover Survey
Increased sense of pride and care of the space Reduced business leakage As above Not specific: Business leakage
Increased units in retail use Yes
Retail survey
Increased sense of cohesion for Govan Cross between The Square, Water Row and Underground sites Improved visitor perception of town centre As above Yes
Increased events and opportunities to socialise at Govan Cross Number/type of events & attendance As above No: need to monitor
Number of work placements Number confirmed Number still in employment/training No: need to monitor

Notes

GSWRA identified outcomes in bold

Indicators that GSWRA need to measure in the future are indicated in italics

6.28 The results below are based on 100 customer surveys that were carried out by Govan Cross Shopping Centre in January 2011.

Table 6.13: Govan Perception Survey: January 2011

Yes No Same
Do you feel the space outside the shopping centre is more attractive? 71% 14% 15%
Does the improved space make you come to the shopping centre more often? 24% 28% 48%
Improving Same Worse
How do you feel about Govan Cross Town Centre as a whole? 76% 12% 12%

Source: GXSC

Progress: Jan/Early Feb 2011

6.29 In May 2010 offers of grant had been prepared for each project based on the full TCRF allocation of £1.3m and all contracts were in the process of being awarded. By November 2010 total TCRF spend was £0.67m.

6.30 Work started on the Pearce Institute building in March 2010. The estimated completion date has slipped from March 2011 to April 2011.

6.31 Contractors were appointed for The Square in March 2010 and started on site in June 2010, three months behind schedule. The work was completed by February 2011.

6.32SPT had to redesign part of the Underground forecourt site, which delayed their site start by six months. As a result the work was not completed until the end of January 2011, five months behind schedule.

6.33 Work on the Shopping Centre public realm improvements commenced in March 2010 slightly behind schedule. Due to problems with workmanship a range of remedial repair works had to be carried out and the project was completed at the end of August 2010.

Conclusions

6.34 The TCRF projects are taking place within the framework of the Central Govan Action Plan ( CGAP) and the Govan Townscape Heritage Initiative ( THI).

6.35 Working up and delivering the TCRF projects has significantly improved relationships with key partners including Govan Cross Shopping Centre and SPT.

6.36 The 'pivotal' nature of TCRF funding for the roof repairs at the Pearce Institute were described as 'timely' in helping to maintain investment in the Pearce Institute and helping to stabilise the fortunes of the Shopping Centre.

6.37 The case study contacts accept the usefulness of the Theory of Change approach and have used this to prepare a more robust monitoring and evaluation framework based on clearer project specific measures but the business turnover and events measures still need to be clarified.

6.38 Attribution will be a challenge as the TCRF is funding only one third of the total cost of the four projects.

6.39 As far as the Govan Cross contacts are concerned the main issues arising in the TCRF project have been:

  • TCRF has been a real catalyst in progressing priority projects like roof repairs to the Pearce Institute and public realm improvements. In some cases, TCRF has allowed the projects to be progressed more quickly or more extensive areas of public realm to be treated;
  • The variable experience of working with and the performance of the four different contractors;
  • Implementation of the projects on site has lead to a more positive perception (See Table 6.13) of the Pearce Institute (improved quality of internal spaces) and the wider Govan Cross area. There have been improvements in confidence and this has given CGAP the opportunity to consider promoting a Business Improvement District.

Case Study Interview Details

Main Contact Name Susan Hanlin
Position Executive Officer
Organisation Central Govan Action Plan and Govan Cross Townscape Heritage Initiative
Phone Number / Mobile 0141 440 2334
E-Mail susan.hanlin @gswra.co.uk
Other Contacts
Name Fiona Burns
Organisation Glasgow City Council
Name Anne McChlery
Position Glasgow Building Preservation Trust
Name David Herring
Position Project Consultant: Rockspring Hanover Property Unit Trust (owners Govan Shopping Centre)