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Scottish Shellfish Farm Production Survey 2011

Scottish Shellfish Farm Production Survey 2011 produced by Marine Scotland Science

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// SITES AND BUSINESSES

The numbers of authorised, active businesses and sites in operation are presented in Tables 3 and 4. Many sites held stock not yet ready for market, others were fallow, and some were positioned in remote areas where cost-effective production and marketing of shellfish proved difficult.

Historically, production data have been collected by business. However, since 2002, data have been collected for both business and site, enabling the provision of more accurate site information. In 2011, 161 sites produced shellfish for sale, an increase of 10% since 2010.

TABLE 3
AUTHORISED AND ACTIVE BUSINESSES 2002-2011.

Number of Businesses
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Active 183 178 175 183 173 170 168 168 164 153

TABLE 4
ACTIVE AND PRODUCING FARM SITES BY REGION 2011.

Region
Highland Orkney Shetland Strathclyde Western Isles All Scotland
Sites
Active 75 6 121 90 43 335
Producing 28 2 65 42 24 161

ACTIVE = FARMS IN A PRODUCTION GROWING CYCLE WHICH MAY CONTAIN STOCK OR BE FALLOW.
PRODUCING = PLACING ON THE MARKET FOR THE TABLE AND ON-GROWING

NB: A BUSINESSES MAY PRODUCE MORE THAN ONE SPECIES AND IN MORE THAN ONE AREA.

FIGURE 2
REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF ACTIVE SHELLFISH SITES IN 2011 (NUMBER PRODUCING GIVEN IN BRACKETS) AND NUMBER OF PRODUCING BUSINESSES BY AREA/SPECIES.

FIGURE 2 REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF ACTIVE SHELLFISH SITES IN 2011 (NUMBER PRODUCING GIVEN IN BRACKETS) AND NUMBER OF PRODUCING BUSINESSES BY AREA/SPECIES.

Ten Several Orders remain in place for scallop fisheries, two of which include native oyster (Fig. 2). Seven of these Orders are in the Highland region, two in Strathclyde and one in Shetland. The size of the Orders measure from 18m2 up to 31 ha.

Table 5 depicts the number of businesses by region and by species: A) in table production, B) in on-growing production and C) showing no production. Many businesses cultivate more than one species on site, a practice made possible by similar cultivation techniques. For example, scallop can be grown together with queen, Pacific oyster with native oyster, and mussel with Pacific oyster.

TABLE 5
NUMBER OF BUSINESSES BY REGION AND BY SPECIES 2011.

A) PRODUCTION FOR THE TABLE

Region
Shetland
Highland Orkney Strathclyde Western Isles All Scotland
Pacific oyster 5 0 1 21 3 30
Native oyster 0 0 0 1 0 1
Scallop 3 0 0 0 0 3
Queen 1 0 0 1 0 2
Mussel 8 0 18 8 6 40
Total 17 0 19 31 9 76

B) PRODUCTION FOR ON-GROWING TO OTHER PRODUCERS

Region
Shetland
Highland Orkney Strathclyde Western Isles All Scotland
Pacific oyster 3 0 0 2 0 5
Native oyster 0 0 0 1 0 1
Scallop 2 0 0 0 0 2
Queen 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mussel 2 0 3 1 2 8
Total 7 0 3 4 2 16

C) NO PRODUCTION, ACTIVELY ON-GROWING OR FALLOW

Region
Shetland
Highland Orkney Strathclyde Western Isles All Scotland
Pacific oyster 4 0 2 10 1 17
Native oyster 4 0 1 1 0 6
Scallop 5 0 2 5 1 13
Queen 2 0 0 0 1 3
Mussel 20 3 7 13 7 50
Total 35 3 12 29 10 89

Business production levels by species are shown in Table 6. There were 15 businesses producing more than 100 tonnes of mussels, a decrease of six businesses since 2010. Out of these 15 companies, five produced more than 300 tonnes. These five companies produced 55% of the total mussel production in Scotland. There were four businesses that produced more than 300,000 Pacific oyster, this is one more than the 2010 total. The production of these four businesses' accounted for 58% of the Scottish total.

TABLE 6 : BUSINESS PRODUCTION LEVELS BY SPECIES 2011.

Species 1- 10 11- 20 21- 30 31- 40 41- 50 51- 60 61- 70 71- 80 81- 90 91- 100 101-200 201-300 >300 Total
Pacific oyster (000s) 12 2 1 0 1 2 1 0 3 1 1 2 4 30
Native Oyster (000s) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Scallop (000s) 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Queen (000s) 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Mussel (tonnes) 1 5 2 2 3 5 2 0 1 4 9 1 5 40
Total 15 7 5 2 5 7 3 0 4 5 10 3 10 76

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