Publication - Advice and guidance

Scottish referral guidelines for suspected cancer: quick reference guide

Published: 22 Jan 2019
Directorate:
Community Health and Social Care Directorate
Part of:
Health and social care
ISBN:
9781787815292

User-friendly visual aid to the urgent referral criteria as well as routine referral criteria and primary care management and good practice points.

50 page PDF

3.0 MB

50 page PDF

3.0 MB

Contents
Scottish referral guidelines for suspected cancer: quick reference guide
Skin Cancers

50 page PDF

3.0 MB

Skin Cancers

Urgent suspicion of cancer referral

Lesions on any part of the body which have one or more of the following features:

  • Change in colour, size or shape in an existing mole
  • Moles with Asymmetry, Border irregularity, Colour irregularity, Diameter increasing or >6mm
  • New growing nodule with or without pigment
  • Persistent (more than four weeks) ulceration, bleeding or oozing
  • Persistent (more than four weeks) surrounding inflammation or altered sensation
  • New or changing pigmented line in a nail or unexplained lesion in a nail
  • Slow growing, non-healing or keratinising lesions with induration (thickened base)
  • Any melanoma or invasive SCC or a high risk BCC diagnosed from biopsy
  • Any unexplained skin lesion in an immuno-suppressed patient
  • BCC invading potentially dangerous areas, for example peri-ocular, auditory meatus or any major vessel or nerve

Good practice points

  • Lesions which are suspicious for melanoma should not be removed in primary care. All excised skin specimens should be sent for pathological examination
  • Lesions suspicious of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) may not require urgent referral, except those invading potentially dangerous areas
  • Referrals should be accompanied by an accurate description of the lesion (including size, pain and tenderness) and photos if possible, subject to clinical governance arrangements, to permit appropriate triage

Contact

Email: Cancer Access Team