Publication - Independent report

Scottish National Standardised Assessments: national report for academic year 2017-2018

Published: 11 Dec 2018
Directorate:
Learning Directorate
Part of:
Education
ISBN:
9781787814554

The report by ACER UK provides a summary of outcomes at a national level on the Scottish National Standardised Assessments.

104 page PDF

2.8 MB

104 page PDF

2.8 MB

Contents
Scottish National Standardised Assessments: national report for academic year 2017-2018
Appendix 6: Region descriptions from the 2017 to 2018 individual reports

104 page PDF

2.8 MB

Appendix 6: Region descriptions from the 2017 to 2018 individual reports

For SNSA, in its first assessment year (2017 to 2018), each year group’s capacity was reported in three broad regions: high, medium and low. The capacity of learners who achieved only a small degree of success on the assessment was labelled ‘low’. Similarly, the capacity of learners who achieved a substantial degree of success on the assessment was labelled as ‘high’.

Each broad region for the 11 Scottish National Standardised Assessments for the 2017 to 2018 academic year had an accompanying ‘region description’. These descriptions were based on a summary of the skills, knowledge and understanding assessed in the questions used in this first assessment, which, in turn, were aligned with CfE benchmarks. The region descriptions for each stage are shown in Tables 9 to 19 below.

6.6.1 Numeracy region descriptions

Table 9: Region descriptions for P1 numeracy

Capacity region Region description
High Learners in this region are typically able to read and order whole numbers up to 100, including locating them on a number line. They are able to count backwards by 1s and to skip count forwards by 2s and 5s. They can also calculate half of a group of objects to solve a word problem. Learners are typically able to order coins according to their value, and to use indirect comparison and reasoning to compare the weights of objects. They can read o’clock times on an analogue clock and use a calendar to identify specific days and the number of days in a given month. Learners can use everyday language of location to place objects in position, including ‘left’ and ‘right’; and they can extract information from tally charts, picture and column graphs to carry out calculations to solve word problems.
Medium Learners in this region are typically able to read and order whole numbers up to 20, and match the numeral to a quantity of objects (including zero). They can continue a sequence of objects with a more complex structure and solve word addition problems involving single- digit numbers. They can also identify half of a familiar object and share a group of objects equally. Learners are typically able to identify coins and order them according to value. They are typically able to compare and order containers according to capacity, interpret a balance to compare the weights of objects, and use informal units to measure the length of objects. They can interpret a column graph to calculate the numerical total of one category.
Low Learners demonstrating capacity in this region are typically able to read and order single-digit numbers and match the numeral to a quantity of objects (including zero). They can continue a sequence of objects with a simple structure, compare quantities of objects, and use appropriate descriptive language including ‘the same’, ‘more’ and ‘most’. They are also able to use ordinal numbers in a real-life context. Learners in this region can compare lengths and heights of objects, extract information from simple column graphs and recognise familiar shapes.

Table 10: Region descriptions for P4 numeracy

Capacity region Region description
High Learners in this region are typically able to solve problems involving simple fractions. They can read analogue and digital times in 5minute intervals. These learners can also compare areas of rectangles on a grid, and extract information from picture and column graphs, in which one symbol represents multiple units and which include half symbols.
Medium

Learners in this region are typically able to read and order whole numbers up to 10 000. They are able to solve problems, applying the correct operations (including multiplication and division) to complete calculations involving 2-digit numbers. They can use correct notation to represent fractions of a single item or a group of items, and use division to find a fraction of a group of items.

Learners are also able to use money to pay for items and work out how much change they should receive. They can read analogue and digital quarter hour times and use a calendar to identify a specific day or date. Learners in this region are typically able to use a scaled tool to measure, identify the appropriate unit of measurement for a specific task, identify a survey question to gather specific data, and extract information from simple pie graphs. They can describe the likelihood of events occurring in everyday situations.

Low Learners in this region are typically able to read and order whole numbers up to 1000, and to link a digit, its place and its value (including zero). They are able to solve simple problems, applying addition and subtraction to complete calculations involving single- digit numbers. Learners in this region are typically able to continue a skip count, identify half as a fraction of a single item, and to read analogue and digital o’clock and half hour times. They can compare lengths of objects, and extract information from simple picture graphs, column graphs and tally charts.

Table 11: Region descriptions for P7 numeracy

Capacity region Region description
High Learners in this region are typically able to read and order whole numbers to at least 1000 000. They are able to carry out calculations to solve problems involving fractions and percentages. They can convert simple fractions to percentages. Learners are also able to interpret data from a variety of representations including line graphs and pie charts, including converting values in pie-charts to percentages.
Medium

Learners in this region are typically able to read and order whole numbers up to 1000 000. They are able to solve problems, applying the correct operations to complete calculations involving four-digit numbers and decimal numbers. They can locate a decimal fraction on a number line and convert simple fractions to decimal fractions. Learners are also able to read scaled instruments and carry out calculations involving the conversion of metric units, and hours and minutes, to solve problems.

They are able to interpret data from a variety of representations including tables, Venn diagrams and column graphs in which one symbol represents multiple units and which include half symbols. They can use the language of probability to describe the likelihood of events occurring.

Low

Learners in this region are typically able to read and order whole numbers up to 10 000.

They are able to solve simple addition and subtraction problems involving 2- and 3-digit numbers, and division problems with a single- digit divisor. Learners are also able to continue a skip counting sequence, calculate the total of a group of coins, and to convert between 12 hour and 24 hour times. They can use a key to extract information from column graphs and tally charts.

Table 12: Region descriptions for S3 numeracy

Capacity region Region description
High Learners in this region are typically able to apply the correct operations (including multiplication and division) to complete calculations involving fractions. They use correct notation to represent fractions, and use division to find a fraction of a group of items or a single-digit number. Learners are also typically able to use a scaled tool to measure and identify the appropriate unit of measurement for a specific task. They can compare areas of rectangles on a grid, identify a survey question to gather specific data, and extract information from column graphs. They can describe the likelihood of events occurring in everyday situations.
Medium

Learners in this region are typically able to round numbers to at least 3 decimal places to solve problems. They can select and apply the correct operations to solve problems involving at least 3-digit decimal fractions. They can also convert between decimal fractions, percentages and fractions to solve problems involving different metric units, units of time and money amounts, and problems involving simple proportions, and ratios.

They can calculate time durations across hours, days and months. Learners are typically able to interpret data from a variety of representations including two-way tables, line and pie graphs, and to draw appropriate conclusions. They can calculate the probability of events and express it as a percentage.

Low Learners in this region are typically able to solve problems using all four operations, working with whole numbers and 2-digit decimal fractions and recalling number facts including the 12th multiplication table. They can convert metric units and calculate cost expressed as decimal fractions. They are able to interpret data from a variety of representations, including tables, column graphs and pie graphs in which one symbol represents multiple units and which include part symbols. They can calculate the probabilities of events, express these as fractions and decimal fractions, and understand the likelihood of a chance event expressed as a percentage.

6.6.2 Reading (including P1 literacy) region descriptions

Table 13: Region descriptions for P1 literacy

Capacity region Region description
High Learners in this region are typically able to manage most aspects of decoding. They demonstrate strong phonological awareness, such as matching words that have the same middle sound. These learners can independently read and interpret sets of longer sentences with some complexities such as tracking pronoun references and interpreting ‘but’. They can also locate prominent, directly stated information and make obvious links to explain events or actions in short narrative and information texts when there is little competing information. When a text is read aloud to them, these learners can interpret some complex ideas such as a metaphorical description of a familiar setting.
Medium Learners in this region are typically able to identify all the letter sounds in short, phonetically regular words, including familiar digraphs (sh, ch, th). They can differentiate between similar sounding letters and identify words that rhyme. These learners can independently read and interpret sets of short sentences when the information is familiar and prominent. They can identify the title on a book cover and use illustrations to make familiar inferences. When a text is read aloud to them, these learners can locate directly stated information and make simple inferences based on obvious clues. They are also able to make links to connect clearly related ideas across paragraphs, discriminate between pieces of information with some similarities, and identify synonyms for words in a story.
Low Learners in this region are typically able to distinguish letters and words from symbols and numerals as well as match together upper and lower case letters. They can recognise most letter sounds and identify the corresponding letters for the first and last sounds in words. These learners are able recognise high frequency words by matching them with corresponding images. When a text is read aloud to them, these learners can make predictions about the story from the illustrations on the front cover. They can also retrieve prominent information and make straightforward inferences from texts read aloud to them.

Capacity region Region description
High Learners in this region are typically able to read a wide range of familiar texts with comprehensive understanding. They can locate relevant details when there is competing information and make links between ideas across multiple sections of a text. They can identify the message of a narrative and make inferences about a character's behaviour, thoughts and feelings, when clues are scattered. They can infer reasons for prominent aspects of a text’s structure, and interpret the main idea and purpose of short texts when there is some competing information.
Medium Learners in this region are typically able to read a wide range of short familiar texts with reasonable understanding of the main meaning. They can recognise paraphrases and synonyms and locate directly stated information. They make simple inferences about a character’s motive, mood and behaviour in narrative texts. These learners can recognise an idea that is clearly implied. They can make obvious links across adjacent sections of a text and use clear support from the context to interpret the meaning of less familiar words and phrases.
Low Learners in this region are typically able to read a wide range of short, familiar texts with limited, mainly literal understanding. They can locate prominent, directly stated information in short narrative, persuasive, procedural and mixed texts and tables when there is little competing information. They make obvious links between ideas that are located close together, and make straightforward generalisations about a character's behaviour or mood when there are several clues and little competing information.

Capacity region Region description
High Learners in this region are typically able to read a wide range of texts with detailed understanding of some complex aspects. They can locate multiple pieces of information in dense descriptions and complex sentences when there is strongly competing information. Reading closely, they can make inferences about the narrator’s viewpoint and a character’s changeable or complex feelings in a narrative text. They can interpret arguments of some complexity, and recognise the main points and justifications for ideas as well as the writer’s purpose and tone.
Medium Learners in this region are typically able to read a wide range of texts with comprehensive understanding where the meaning is straightforward. They can locate details about cause and intention and other key pieces of information, and link ideas within and across paragraphs when there is competing information. When reading narrative texts, they can interpret clues to make inferences about characters’ feelings, attitudes and motivations, and recognise implied ideas. These learners are able to identify the main idea and persuasive purpose of texts; they can interpret the writer’s intention in persuasive texts. They can also use context to interpret the meaning of idiomatic expressions.
Low Learners in this region are typically able to read a wide range of familiar texts with reasonable understanding of the main meaning. They can locate directly stated details in narrative, information, persuasive and procedural texts and tables. When reading narrative texts they can make straightforward inferences about characters’ opinions, actions and motivations. They are able to track pronoun references and make links across texts when the connections are clear. They can use obvious contextual support to interpret the meaning of less familiar words and phrases.

Table 16: Region descriptions for S3 reading

Capacity region Region description
High Learners in this region are typically able to read a wide range of texts with a high level of understanding of several, substantial complexities. They read closely, and locate and interpret details about unfamiliar facts, content or style in information texts when there is highly plausible competing information. When reading narrative texts they make inferences about a character’s behaviour and attitude, when there are challenging elements such as contradictory emotions or complex sentence structures. These learners can identify the main point of a multifaceted argument, interpret opposing points of view, and make justifiable deductions. They are able to analyse tone, style and writer’s purpose in texts with substantial complexities.
Medium Learners in this region are typically able to read a wide range of texts with reasonable understanding of a complex element. They can locate details embedded in complex sentences when there is much competing information, in a wide range of texts. They can make inferences about a character’s contradictory emotions and primary concerns in narratives, reading closely to interpret the relevant evidence. They can also combine evidence from across the text to identify main ideas, understand counter-intuitive information and interpret complex language. These learners can evaluate the credibility of statements in context in persuasive texts. They are able to interpret tone, mood, authorial intent, persuasive techniques and the writer’s point of view in texts of some complexity.
Low Learners in this region are typically able to read a wide range of texts with comprehensive understanding where the meaning is straightforward. They can locate and sort key ideas and details across tables to make connections, and recognise paraphrased information when there are competing details in information texts. These learners can make inferences about a character’s feelings in the presence of conflicting emotions, recognise a character’s overriding concern and interpret attitudes in narrative texts of some complexity. They can read closely to make generalisations and recognise the effect of authorial comment and the main purpose of a text. They are also able to identify the likely audience for a text and the reason for choice of a title.

6.6.3 Writing region descriptions

Table 17: Region descriptions for P4 writing

Capacity region Region description
High

Learners in this region are typically able to spell common words of up to three syllables. They can also spell some less common short words when there is a spelling challenge such as a medial consonant that could be double or single (r, l); vowels that are combined; a medial silent letter; or a letter sound that is unpredictable.

These learners can appropriately select articles for common nouns and select common prefixes. They can recognise the correct use of possessive pronouns and common paired conjunctions. They use a range of verb forms and adjectival clauses to complete sentences with mainly simple structures. They identify the need for capital letters in a title, and apostrophes in common contractions. They use some aspects of direct speech punctuation in sentences with simple structures.

Medium Learners in this region are typically able to spell common words of one or two syllables and longer phonetically regular words. They can spell words with most common digraphs (ch, ck, gh, th) and familiar words with combined vowels or a double consonant. They can select appropriate prepositions to complete a phrase. They can identify simple verb forms and a range of common conjunctions to complete or join simple sentences. These learners identify the need for capital letters for familiar proper nouns.
Low Learners in this region are typically able to spell common words of one or two syllables beginning and ending in two-consonant blends. They can spell familiar words with a few common digraphs (th, wh) or a pair of commonly combined vowels (ee, ea), or where one letter sound is ambiguous (c sounds like s). They can apply common rules such as adding -ed, removing e from the root word to add -ing, and doubling a final consonant to add -ing. They can typically identify very common conjunctions (and, then), and select common comparative adjectives, pronouns and verb forms to complete or join simple sentences. These learners can correctly place full stops and question marks in simple sentences.

Table 18: Region descriptions for P7 writing

Capacity region Region description
High Learners in this region are typically able to spell a range of less common words when there are two spelling challenges, such as multiple medial consonants that could be double or single (m, r, l, s, p); various vowel combinations (ou, oi, ea, io); a letter sound that is ambiguous or often mispronounced; less common digraphs (mb, gh); or blends of three or four consonants. They can typically use a range of appropriate pronouns, prepositions and verb forms in complex, compound and simple sentences. They can apply a range of prefixes appropriately and name some common parts of speech. They can recognise where parentheses or commas should be used to separate short clauses or phrases, in complex sentences. They can typically punctuate direct speech.
Medium Learners in this region are typically able to spell common words of up to five syllables and some less common shorter words with a spelling challenge, such as a multiple medial consonants that could be single or double (r, l, c, p, s); several combined vowels (ea, ie, io, ui, ou); or a medial letter sound that is unpredictable. They can select appropriate articles for common nouns, and identify simple possessive pronouns and common prefixes. They show understanding of a range of verb forms and adjectival clauses to complete simple and compound sentences. Regarding punctuation, they can typically place commas appropriately in complex sentences and use apostrophes in common contractions. They can identify aspects of simple direct speech punctuation.
Low Learners in this region are typically able to spell common words of up to four syllables and some less common short words where there is a spelling dilemma, such as a single medial consonant that could be doubled (r, l); one pair of common combined vowels (ie, ou); or less common consonant blends and digraphs (dg, gh). They can spell common endings (ure, tion, ful, vowel/consonant/e pattern). These learners can typically select a range of verb forms to correctly complete a sentence, link sentences using a range of common conjunctions, and identify a redundant word in a simple sentence. In sentences with simple structures they can identify the correct positions for commas in lists and commas used to separate distinct clauses. They can identify where singular possessive apostrophes are required.

Table 19: Region descriptions for S3 writing

Capacity region Region description
High Learners in this region are typically able to spell less common words with several challenging features, such as medial consonants that could be double or single; multiple combined vowels (au, ou, oi, ea, io, ua); unusual consonant blends (gn); or a letter sound that is ambiguous, or often mispronounced or incorrectly omitted. These learners apply a wide range of grammatical conventions to complex sentence structures. They demonstrate technical accuracy in their knowledge of conventional usage in clause placement, co-ordination of conjunctions, and indefinite pronouns. They are able to detect ambiguity in pronoun references. Regarding punctuation, learners in this region typically select appropriate punctuation for a wide range of complex sentences. They can identify correct usage of singular and plural possessive apostrophes and select correct punctuation where direct speech is broken up.
Medium Learners in this region are typically able to spell common words of up to five syllables and less common, shorter words with a challenging spelling feature, such as multiple medial consonants; several combined vowels (ea, ie, io, ui, ou); or a medial letter sound that is ambiguous or silent. These learners typically use a range of appropriate pronouns, prepositions and verb forms, in sentences with some structural complexity. They can choose correct prefixes and name common parts of speech. When punctuating, these learners are able to identify appropriate placement of parentheses, apostrophes for contraction and possession, and commas to separate short clauses. They can punctuate direct speech in a simple sentence.
Low Learners in this region are typically able to spell common words of up to four syllables and some less common, short words where there is a spelling dilemma, such as a single medial consonant that could be double (r, l); or one instance of combined vowels (ie, ou). They can spell words with a range of consonant blends and digraphs (dg, gh) and common endings (ate, tion,). These learners typically select appropriate articles for common nouns, and correctly identify simple possessive pronouns and common prefixes. They use a range of verb forms and adjectival clauses to complete simple and compound sentences. They identify appropriate placement of commas in complex sentences and apostrophes in common contractions and for singular possession. They can identify some aspects of speech punctuation in sentences with simple structures.

6.6.4 Interpretation of region descriptions

For each assessment, the region descriptions above were provided in the first section of each learner’s individual report. In the other two school-level reports – the Group Diagnostic Report and the Group Aggregate Report – the overall capacity result (‘low’, ‘medium’, or ‘high’) was included.

The overall result for a learner on one of the 2017 to 2018 Scottish National Standardised Assessments indicated that he or she was approximately twice as likely as not to be able to succeed on questions addressing the skills, knowledge and understanding described in the relevant region description above. The capacity of learners who achieved only a small degree of success on the assessment was labelled ‘low’. Similarly, the capacity of learners who achieved substantial success on the assessment was labelled as ‘high’.


Contact

Email: National Improvement Framework Unit