Publication - Statistics

Scotland's People Annual Report: Results from 2013 Scottish Household Survey: Revised October 2015

Published: 13 Aug 2014
Part of:
Statistics
ISBN:
9781784127428

A National Statistics publication for Scotland, providing reliable and up-to-date information on the composition, characteristics, behaviour and attitudes of Scottish households and adults across a number of topic areas including local government, neighbourhoods, health and transport.

217 page PDF

2.2 MB

217 page PDF

2.2 MB

Contents
Scotland's People Annual Report: Results from 2013 Scottish Household Survey: Revised October 2015
13 Culture and Sport

217 page PDF

2.2 MB

13 Culture and Sport

INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT

The Scottish Government is committed to promoting and supporting sport and cultural activities because it recognises and values the benefits that sport and culture bring, not only to individuals, but to our communities. The Government's work is focused on widening access and participation and ensuring that the necessary infrastructure is in place to deliver sporting and cultural opportunities whilst promoting a drive to achieve sporting and cultural excellence. This work contributes to the Government's strategic objectives[118], through understanding and monitoring levels of cultural engagement and sporting participation both at the national and sub-national levels and to inform decisions on government and local government policy making. For example, Scottish Household Survey (SHS) data informs National Indicator 41: Increase cultural engagement.

The SHS is the primary source of information on cultural attendance and sporting participation in Scotland and it is the only source of data on attendance and participation at local authority level. Questions on cultural attendance and sporting participation were introduced in the SHS for the first time in 2007. From 2012 onwards, it is possible to obtain data at local authority level every year.

The suite of culture and sport questions within the SHS covers attendance at cultural events and places, and participating in cultural and sport and exercise activities. This chapter explores the prevalence and frequency of attending cultural events and places of culture and participating in cultural activities in the last 12 months and of participation in sport and exercise in the last 4 weeks. There is also analysis on engagement with the 2014 Commonwealth Games, questions on which were included in the Scottish Household Survey for the first time in 2013.

Main Findings

  • Around nine in ten (91 per cent) adults engaged in culture in 2013, either through attending or visiting a cultural event or place or participating in a cultural activity and is a one percentage point increase from 90 per cent in 2012.
  • Four in five (80 per cent) adults have attended a cultural event or place in the last 12 months which is up from 78 per cent in 2012. The most popular form of cultural attendance was watching films at a cinema with 56 per cent of adults having done so in 2013 compared to 54 per cent in 2012.
  • Attendance at all cultural events or places either increased between 2012 and 2013, or remained the same. The largest increase seen was a 3 percentage point increase in the proportion of adults attending culturally specific festivals.
  • Overall attendance was higher amongst women than men (3 percentage point difference), but this was not true of all types of cultural place or event. The gap between males and females increases when trips to the cinema are excluded (7 percentage point difference).
  • Overall levels of cultural attendance fell with increasing age of respondent - partly due to the popularity of cinema attendance amongst younger age groups (83 per cent of 16 to 24 year olds compared to 18 per cent of adults aged 75 and over attended cinema in the last 12 months).
  • Over three-quarters (78 per cent) of adults participated in some form of cultural activity in 2013, the same level as in 2012. When reading for pleasure was excluded, the figure was 49 per cent which is around the 2012 figure of 48 per cent.
  • By far the most popular form of cultural participation was reading for pleasure at 68 per cent. Overall participation in cultural activities was higher amongst women (84 per cent) than men (73 per cent), again, this was not true for all activities.
  • Over three-quarters of adults (78 per cent) participated in sport and exercise (including recreational walking) in the last four weeks. This was an increase from 74 per cent seen in 2012. Walking for 30 minutes (for recreational purposes) was by far the most prevalent activity with around two-thirds (65 per cent) of adults having done this, an increase of 7 percentage points from 2012.
  • When walking was excluded, around half of adults (52 per cent) had undertaken at least one of the remaining sport and exercise activities in the last four weeks. This represented a one percentage point increase from the level seen in 2012.
  • Overall sport and exercise participation was higher for men than women (81 per cent and 75 per cent respectively). This difference was larger when walking was excluded, with 58 per cent of men and 46 per cent of women having participated in a sport or exercise other than walking.
  • Sport and exercise participation decreased with age, particularly amongst adults aged 45 or older. Between 86 and 90 per cent of adults aged between 16 to 44 participated in the previous four weeks in 2013 decreasing to 46 per cent of those aged 75 or older.
  • The frequency of participation amongst those who take part in sport and exercise has increased since 2007. In 2007, 36 per cent of participants took part in sport regularly (on more than 15 days) in the four weeks prior to interview. In 2013, this figure had increased to 48 per cent.
  • 2013 saw an increase in the satisfaction levels of adults (including non-users) with all local authority culture and sports and leisure facilities. Satisfaction with sports and leisure facilities increased two percentage points since 2012 to 53 per cent, the highest level recorded since data was first collected in 2007. Theatres or concert halls and museums and galleries also recorded a 2 percentage point increase in satisfaction since 2012. The corresponding figures for service users in the past year were around nine in ten service users being satisfied with all culture and sports and leisure facilities.
  • Around four in five (78 per cent) adults reported their intention to follow the Commonwealth Games in some way (note: all figures refer to data collected throughout 2013). Watching on TV was the most commonly reported method among these with 72 per cent of adults reporting their intention to do this. Around a third of adults reported their intention to get actively involved in the Games (32 per cent), with attending events being the most popular method (17 per cent).
  • Four in ten adults (41 per cent) in Scotland believed there will be a lasting benefit from Scotland hosting the Games, either to themselves and their family, or to their local area. This was felt strongly in large urban areas (48 per cent) and less so in remote rural areas (27 per cent).

CULTURE

Within this report, attendance at "a cultural event or place of culture" is defined as those adults who attend at least one type of cultural place in the previous year. There are a number of different types of cultural events and places of culture. Examples of these include cinemas, libraries and live music events. For a complete list of cultural places or events see the Glossary in Annex 2.

Likewise, participation in any cultural activity means that adults take part in at least one activity in the previous year. Examples of cultural activities include reading for pleasure, dancing and crafts. The Glossary in Annex 2 provides a complete list of activities which are classed as cultural participation.

The percentage of adults who have engaged in culture is defined as those who have either participated in a cultural activity or who have attended at least one type of cultural place in the previous 12 months.

This report provides high level information on cultural engagement, attendance and participation. It also provides some key messages on adults’ levels of satisfaction with local authority cultural services. More detailed information on the reasons for (and not) attending cultural places and participating in particular activities is available in the Scottish Household Survey People and Culture in Scotland 2007/2008 report, published in November 2009. A more detailed topic report on new culture questions contained in the 2013 Scottish Household Survey this year will be published in December 2014.

CULTURAL ENGAGEMENT

This section contains data on levels of cultural engagement. This is a composite measure which measures the percentage of adults who have either participated in a cultural activity or who have attended or visited a cultural event or place in the last 12 months. This information is used to inform progress on the Scottish Government’s National Indicator 41: Increase cultural engagement

Figure 13.1 shows that in 2013, the percentage of adults who engaged in culture was around nine in ten (91 per cent). It is worth noting that the 2012 and 2013 figures are not directly comparable to those for the years 2007 to 2011 due to changes in the wording of the cultural attendance and participation questions; the figures for these years are provided for illustration only. More detailed information on wording of the culture questions can be found in the Scottish Household Survey questionnaires for 2012 and 2013[119]. The wording of the previous culture questions can be found in the corresponding questionnaire for 2011.

Figure 13.1: Cultural engagement by adults in the last 12 months by year

Percentages, 2007 to 2013 data (2013 base: 9,920)

Figure 13.1: Cultural engagement by adult in the last 12 months by year

* Note that the figures for 2012 and 2013 are not directly comparable with previous years due to changes in the wording of the cultural attendance and participation questions.

ATTENDANCE AT CULTURAL EVENTS AND PLACES

Attendance at specific cultural events or places

Figure 13.2 shows levels of attendance by adults at specific cultural events and visiting places of culture (not as a result of paid work, school or academic activities) in the last 12 months for 2012 and 2013.

The chart shows that:

  • In 2013, four in five adults (80 per cent) attended a cultural event or place of culture in the last 12 months, an increase from 78 per cent in 2012[120]. When excluding cinema, the attendance figure falls to 72 per cent in 2013 compared to 70 per cent in 2012.
  • Attendance at all events or places listed either increased or stayed the same between 2012 and 2013. The largest increase seen was a 3 percentage point increase in attendance at culturally specific festivals (from 11 per cent to 14 per cent).
  • Over half of respondents (56 per cent) viewed a film at a cinema in the last 12 months, making this the most common type of cultural attendance.
  • The next most common type of cultural attendance was at the theatre (32 per cent), followed by museums and live music events (both 31 per cent), libraries (30 per cent), and historical or archaeological places (28 per cent).
  • Each of the remaining types of cultural places recorded in the survey was attended by around 20 per cent of adults or less, with galleries at 20 per cent being the most attended of the rest.
  • A fifth of adults (20 per cent) did not attend a cultural event or place of culture in the last 12 months in 2013, down slightly from 22 per cent of adults having not attending in 2012.

Figure 13.2: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months, 2012-2013

2012-2013 data, Adults (2013 base: 9,920)

Figure 13.2: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months, 2012-2013

Attendance by gender and age

Table 13.1 shows levels of attendance at any cultural event or place of culture in the last 12 months by gender and age of respondent for 2013. Figure 13.3 displays the age trends of attendance including and excluding cinema.

More women attended a cultural event than men (82 per cent and 79 per cent respectively). When excluding cinema, the difference between men and women is greater (7 percentage points), although the difference is much less than that for cultural participation. Analysis on cultural participation by gender is presented later in this chapter (Table 13.6).

The level of overall cultural attendance was highest among younger age groups and decreased for those aged 45 or older. Whilst levels of cultural attendance are 88 per cent or greater for adults aged 16 to 45, the figure falls to 80 per cent for those aged 45 to 59 and to just over half (54 per cent) of all adults aged 75 or over. When excluding cinema, cultural attendance rose to a peak in the 35 to 44 year-old age group before declining again as age increased, as illustrated in Figure 13.3.

Table 13.1: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months, by gender and age

Percentages, 2013 data

Adults Male Female 16 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 59 60 to 74 75 plus All
Any cultural attendance (including cinema) 79 82 91 88 89 80 72 54 80
Any cultural attendance (excluding cinema) 69 76 74 77 81 74 69 52 72
Base 4,450 5,470 830 1,350 1,450 2,590 2,400 1,300 9,920

Percentages add up to more than 100 per cent as multiple responses allowed

Figure 13.3: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months, by age

2013 data (2013 base minimum: 830)

Figure 13.3: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by age

Table 13.2 shows how attendance at specific cultural events and visiting places of culture varies by gender and age.

The key points are:

  • There are some cultural events or places which women were more likely to attend or visit than men. The greatest percentage point difference was for attendance at plays, drama or theatrical performances (39 per cent of women compared with 25 per cent of men). Library visits also showed considerable differences by gender, 34 per cent of women and 25 per cent of men reported that they visited in the last 12 months.
  • In contrast, there were many cultural events where attendance by men and women was similar. For instance, 31 per cent of both men and women stated that they attended a live music event in the past year and 28 per cent had visited a historic place.
  • Cultural attendance at specific events or places varied by age. Differences between the youngest and oldest age groups were most marked for cinema attendance and for attendance at live music events. Around four-fifths (83 per cent) of 16 to 24 year olds stated that they had viewed films at the cinema in the last 12 months, compared with 18 per cent of those aged 75 or greater. Under half (46 per cent) of 16 to 24 year olds stated that they had attended a live music event in the last 12 months, compared with 20 per cent of 60 to 74 year olds and 8 per cent of those aged 75 or over.
  • For some cultural places, attendance was highest for many of the middle and older age groups. This included attendance at theatres where around a third of 35 to 44 and 45 to 74 year olds stated they attended (36 per cent and 37 per cent, respectively) compared with 23 per cent of 16 to 24 year olds and 75 or greater.

Table 13.2: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by gender and age

Percentages, 2013 data

Adults Male Female 16 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 59 60 to 74 75 plus All
Cinema 55 57 83 74 69 53 34 18 56
Live music event - e.g. traditional music, rock concert, jazz event (not opera or classical music performance) 31 31 46 36 35 32 20 8 31
Theatre - e.g. pantomime/musical/play 25 39 23 28 36 37 36 23 32
Library (including mobile and online) 25 34 28 31 37 28 29 27 30
Museum 30 31 25 35 40 32 30 15 31
Historic place - e.g. castle, stately home and grounds, battle or archaeological site 28 28 25 25 38 30 27 14 28
Gallery 18 21 16 20 25 21 20 9 20
Exhibition - including art, photography and crafts 15 16 12 13 18 18 18 8 16
Street arts (e.g. musical performances or art in parks, streets or shopping centre) 13 14 15 16 19 15 11 4 14
Culturally specific festival
(e.g. mela/Feis/local Gala days)
14 15 11 16 23 16 12 5 14
Dance show/event - e.g. ballet 8 13 11 10 15 11 8 4 10
Classical music performance or opera 6 8 5 5 6 9 10 7 7
Book festival or reading group 4 5 4 4 6 5 5 3 5
Archive or records office (e.g. Scotland's Family History Peoples Centre) 3 2 2 1 2 3 4 2 2
None 21 18 9 12 11 20 28 46 20
Base 4,450 5,470 830 1,350 1,450 2,590 2,400 1,300 9,920

Columns add to more than 100 per cent since multiple responses allowed.

Attendance by highest level of qualification

Figure 13.4 shows that in 2013, attendance at cultural places and visiting places of culture was highest for those with degrees or professional qualifications (93 per cent). Attendance was lowest for those with no qualifications (53 per cent). The percentage of adults who attended any cultural event or place (excluding cinema) showed a similar picture; 89 per cent for those with degrees or professional qualifications and 46 per cent for those with no qualifications.

Figure 13.4: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by highest level of qualification

2013 data, Adults (base: 9,920)

Figure 13.4: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by highest level of qualification

Table 13.3 gives a breakdown of attendance at each individual cultural event or place. Attendance was consistently highest for adults with a degree or professional qualification. Attendance at different types of cultural event or place was lowest among adults with no qualifications, with the largest attendance gaps in cinema attendance where there was a 48 percentage point gap between those who attended the cinema (72 per cent) with a degree or professional qualification and those with no qualification (24 per cent). The next largest observed differences were in visits to museums and historic places, both with a 42 percentage point gap between those with a degree or professional qualification and those with no qualifications. These results mirrored patterns seen in 2012.

Table 13.3: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by highest qualification level

Percentages, 2013 data

Adults Degree, Professional qualification HNC/HND or equivalent Higher, A level or equivalent O' Grade, Standard grade or equivalent Other qualification No qualifications Qualifications not known All
Cinema 72 67 70 57 25 24 52 56
Live music event - e.g. traditional music, rock concert, jazz event (not opera or classical music performance) 43 39 40 27 12 10 16 31
Theatre - e.g. pantomime/musical/play 47 38 34 24 27 17 22 32
Library (including mobile and online) 51 33 33 20 16 13 15 30
Museum 50 33 29 17 14 8 13 31
Historic place - e.g. castle, stately home and grounds, battle or archaeological site 51 35 26 18 15 9 * 28
Gallery 37 19 22 10 9 6 14 20
Exhibition - including art, photography and crafts 31 18 16 7 7 4 1 16
Street arts (e.g. musical performances or art in parks, streets or shopping centre) 22 17 15 11 8 4 7 14
Culturally specific festival
(e.g. mela/Feis/local Gala days)
25 17 16 9 8 5 1 14
Dance show/event - e.g. ballet 17 11 11 9 5 4 2 10
Classical music performance or opera 16 7 6 3 4 2 6 7
Book festival or reading group 11 3 3 2 1 1 1 5
Archive or records office (e.g. Scotland's Family History Peoples Centre) 4 3 2 2 2 1 0 2
None 7 10 10 19 37 47 28 20
Base 2,660 1,040 1,530 1,780 550 2,280 70 9,920

Columns add to more than 100 per cent since multiple responses allowed.

Attendance by area deprivation

Figure 13.5 shows that levels of cultural attendance had an linear relationship with area deprivation. That is, respondents living in more deprived areas were the least likely to visit a cultural place or event, with attendance level increasing as area deprivation decreases.

There is an 18 percentage point difference in cultural attendance by adults between the 20 per cent most and 20 per cent least deprived areas (72 per cent compared with 90 per cent). This was the same gap as seen in 2012. When excluding cinema, the differences in attendance were more pronounced (61 per cent in the most deprived areas and 85 per cent in the least deprived areas). This is a gap of 24 percentage points, which has increased by one percentage point between 2012 and 2013.

Figure 13.5: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

2013 data, Adults (base (minimum): 1,760)

Figure 13.5: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

Table 13.4: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by area deprivation

Percentages, 2012 - 2013 data

Adults 2012 2013 2013 Base
Attendance
(including cinema)
Attendance
(excluding cinema)
Attendance
(including cinema)
Attendance
(excluding cinema)
Most deprived 20% 70 60 72 61 1,890
2nd 73 63 76 67 2,020
3rd 77 69 79 71 2,150
4th 82 75 85 78 2,100
Least deprived 20% 88 83 90 85 1,760
Scotland 78 70 80 72 9,920

Columns add to more than 100 per cent since multiple responses allowed.

Attendance by long-term physical/mental health condition

Figure 13.6 shows that those with a physical or mental health condition lasting, or expected to last 12 months or more, were less likely (66 per cent) to attend cultural events or places than those who don’t report any long term condition (86 per cent). The same pattern existed when considering cultural attendance (excluding cinema), although the difference is smaller.

Of those with long term conditions, those whose daily capacity is reduced a lot attended less than those whose daily capacity is diminished a little. Around half of adults whose long term condition affects their daily capabilities a lot attended any cultural event (51 per cent), compared to 76 per cent of those whose condition only has a small effect on their ability to carry out day-to-day tasks.

Figure 13.6: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by long term physical/mental health condition

2013 data, Adults (base (minimum): 1,440)

Figure 13.6: Attendance at Cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 moths by long term physical/mental health condition

This question was asked in the survey from October (Q4) 2012

Frequency of attending cultural events or places

Table 13.5 provides more information on how frequently those who attended particular cultural events or visited places of culture had done so in the past year. The table shows that libraries are by far the most frequently visited cultural place or event. Of those that had visited a library, around one in five (20 per cent) visited at least once a week in the past year. A further 39 per cent of respondents had visited at least once a month. For comparison, of those who visited a cinema, 4 per cent had attended once a week and around a quarter (23 per cent) had attended at least once a month. Visits to other cultural events or places in the past 12 months were far less frequent.

Table 13.5: Frequency of attending cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months

Row percentages, 2013 data

Adults At least once a week Less often than once a week/at least once a month Less often than once a month/at least 3-4 times a year Twice in the last 12 months Once in the last 12 months Don't know Total Base
Cinema 4 23 43 21 10 0 100 4,910
Live music event - e.g. traditional music, rock concert, jazz event (not opera or classical music performance) 2 10 30 31 27 0 100 2,800
Theatre - e.g. pantomime/musical/play 0 4 25 39 32 0 100 3,080
Library (including mobile and online) 20 39 19 16 7 1 100 3,060
Museum 1 9 29 36 25 0 100 2,980
Historic place - e.g. castle, stately home and grounds, battle or archaeological site 1 10 36 33 20 0 100 2,690
Gallery 1 12 29 35 23 0 100 1,940
Exhibition - including art, photography and crafts 1 8 24 34 32 1 100 1,580
Street arts (e.g. musical performances or art in parks, streets or shopping centre) 2 5 18 32 42 1 100 1,260
Culturally specific festival (e.g. mela/Feis/local Gala days) 0 2 13 30 54 1 100 1,450
Dance show/event - e.g. ballet 1 4 15 28 51 0 100 1,000
Classical music performance or opera 1 8 25 30 35 1 100 750
Book festival or reading group 2 11 9 20 57 1 100 470
Archive or records office (e.g. Scotland's Family History Peoples Centre) 3 8 19 17 51 2 100 260

PARTICIPATION IN CULTURAL ACTIVITIES

This section contains data on adults who participated in a cultural activity in the last 12 months in 2013, a comparison to participation in 2012, as well as participation in specific activities over this time period. Data is presented on cultural participation for a number of socio-economic indicators. These include gender, age, highest level of qualification, area deprivation and long-standing illness, health problem or disability. Participation in ‘any cultural activity’ is a composite measure, which when combined with ‘any cultural attendance’ generates the headline cultural engagement figure.

Data are also provided on the frequency in which those who have participated in culture have done so in the past 12 months.

Participation in specific cultural activities

Figure 13.7 shows levels of cultural participation in specific activities by adults in the last 12 months for 2013, and a comparison to 2012.

The chart shows that:

  • Overall, participation in a cultural activity in the last 12 months was 78 per cent - the same as in 2012. When excluding reading, the percentage of adults who participated in a cultural activity was lower at 49 per cent - a one percentage point increase from 2012.
  • Reading for pleasure was by far the most common cultural activity in 2013 with 68 per cent of adults saying that they had done this in the last year, one percentage point lower than in 2012.
  • The next most popular activity was doing creative work on a computer or by social media at 23 per cent, the same level as seen in 2012. This was followed by crafts at 15 per cent (one percentage point higher than 2012). Twelve per cent of respondents had participated in dance in 2013, followed by 11 per cent of adults having played an instrument or written music; the same levels for both activities as seen in 2012.
  • Participation levels in all other cultural activities was 10 per cent or less.

Figure 13.7: Participation in cultural activities in the last 12 months

2012 - 2013 data, Adults (base: 9,918)

Figure 13.7: Participation in cultural activities in the last 12 months

Participation by gender and age

Table 13.6 shows levels of participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by gender and age of respondent for 2013.

More women participated in a cultural activity than men (84 per cent and 73 per cent respectively). When excluding reading, the difference between women and men was smaller (52 per cent and 45 per cent respectively).

Overall levels of cultural participation were broadly constant for all age groups (ranging between 74 per cent and 81 per cent). The differences between age groups were more marked when considering cultural participation excluding reading and decreased as age increased (from 59 per cent of adults aged 16 to 24 to 33 per cent of adults aged 75 or over). This is illustrated in Figure 13.8.

Table 13.6: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by gender and age

Column percentages, 2013 data

Adults Male Female 16 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 59 60 to 74 75 plus All
Participated in any (including reading) 73 84 77 75 81 79 81 74 78
Participated in any (excluding reading) 45 52 59 50 49 49 47 33 49
Base 4,450 5,470 830 1,350 1,450 2,590 2,400 1,300 9,920

Figure 13.8: Participation in cultural activities in the last 12 months by age

2013 data, Adults (base: 9,920)

Figure 13.8: Participation in cultural activities in the last 12 months by age

Table 13.7 shows how participation in specific cultural activities varied by age and gender.

The key points are:

  • Women participated more than men in a number of cultural activities including reading for pleasure (75 per cent compared with 60 per cent), crafts (23 per cent compared with 6 per cent) and dancing (15 per cent compared with 9 per cent).
  • Participation was higher for men than women for playing a musical instrument or writing music (14 per cent of men, 8 per cent of women) and photography/making films or videos (11 per cent compared with 8 per cent).
  • Participation in some, but not all, cultural activities decreased with increasing age of respondent. For instance, 34 per cent of 16 to 24 year olds and 27 per cent of 25 to 34 year olds used a computer or social media to produce creative work of any kind. This is compared with 17 per cent of 60 to 74 year olds and 6 per cent of those aged 75 or older. Participation in dance was most popular for younger age groups (18 per cent of 16 to 24 year olds compared with 6 per cent for those aged 75 or above).
  • Reading for pleasure was more popular among 35 to 74 year olds with around 70 per cent for these age groups compared to 57 per cent of 16 to 24 year olds.

Table 13.7: Participation in cultural activities in the last 12 months by gender and age

Percentages, 2013 data

Adults Male Female 16 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 59 60 to 74 75 plus All
Read for pleasure (not newspapers, magazines or comics) 60 75 57 64 71 70 73 66 68
Used a computer/social media to produce creative work of any kind 23 22 34 27 25 22 17 6 23
Crafts such as knitting, wood, pottery, etc. 6 23 8 11 13 15 22 17 15
Dance - e.g. ceilidh, salsa, Highland dancing, ballet 9 15 18 13 12 12 9 6 12
Played a musical instrument or written music 14 8 19 12 12 10 6 5 11
Photography/making films or videos as an artistic activity (not family or holiday 'snaps') 11 8 9 12 10 12 8 3 10
Painting, drawing, printmaking or sculpture 8 12 17 14 11 7 6 5 10
Creative writing - stories, books, plays or poetry 5 5 10 4 5 4 3 2 5
Took part in a play/sang in a choir or other performance (not karaoke) 2 4 7 2 3 4 3 2 3
Other cultural activity 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
None 27 16 23 25 19 21 19 26 22
Base 4,450 5,470 830 1,350 1,450 2,590 2,400 1,300 9,920

Columns add to more than 100 per cent since multiple responses allowed.

Participation by highest level of qualification

As with cultural attendance, Figure 13.9 shows that participation in any cultural activity in 2013 was highest amongst adults with a degree or professional qualifications (92 per cent) and lowest for those with no qualifications (57 per cent). A similar picture can be seen when looking at the percentage of adults who participated in a cultural activity other than reading, although the difference between qualification levels is even greater. Participation rates for specific cultural activities are shown in Table 13.8.

Figure 13.9: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by highest level of qualification

2013 data, Adults (base: 9,920)

Figure 13.9: Participation in any cultural activities in the last 12 months by highest level of qualification

Table 13.8: Participation in cultural activities in the last 12 months by highest level of qualification

Percentages, 2013 data

Adults Degree, Professional qualification HNC/HND or equivalent Higher, A level or equivalent O' Grade, Standard grade or equivalent Other qualification No qualifications Qualifications not known All
Read for pleasure (not newspapers, magazines or comics) 85 72 70 58 65 50 40 68
Used a computer/social media to produce creative work of any kind 32 27 28 19 12 8 12 23
Crafts such as knitting, wood, pottery, etc. 20 18 12 10 18 12 10 15
Dance - e.g. ceilidh, salsa, Highland dancing, ballet 18 15 15 8 6 5 8 12
Played a musical instrument or written music 17 11 14 8 4 4 8 11
Photography/making films or videos as an artistic activity (not family or holiday 'snaps') 16 14 10 7 3 2 - 10
Painting, drawing, printmaking or sculpture 14 13 11 10 4 3 8 10
Creative writing - stories, books, plays or poetry 8 4 6 4 1 1 - 5
Took part in a play/sang in a choir or other performance (not karaoke) 6 4 3 2 1 1 7 3
Other cultural activity 4 2 2 2 1 1 - 2
None 8 16 17 28 25 40 43 22
Base 2,660 1,040 1,530 1,780 550 2,280 70 9,920

Columns add to more than 100 per cent since multiple responses allowed.

Participation by area deprivation

Figure 13.10 shows that adult cultural participation varied with the level of deprivation in the area that respondents lived in. Respondents living in more deprived areas participated less in any cultural activity - there was nearly a 20 percentage point difference in cultural participation between the most and least deprived areas. The percentage of adults who participated in a cultural activity other than reading in the past 12 months showed a similar pattern.

Table 13.9 shows that while there are differences across deprivation levels, there has been no significant change in participation levels between 2012 and 2013, both when including and excluding reading.

Figure 13.10: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

2013 data, Adults (base: 9,920)

Figure 13.10: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

Table 13.9 Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by area deprivation

Percentages, 2012-2013 data

Adults 2012 2013 2013 Base
Participation
(including reading)
Participation
(excluding reading)
Participation
(including reading)
Participation
(excluding reading)
Most deprived 20% 68 38 68 40 1,890
2nd 74 42 73 44 2,020
3rd 80 49 79 50 2,150
4th 83 55 83 53 2,100
Least deprived 20% 87 55 88 56 1,760
Scotland 78 48 78 49 9,920

Participation by long-term physical/mental health condition

Figure 13.11 shows that those with a physical or mental health condition lasting, or expected to last 12 months or more, were less likely (74 per cent) to participate than those without (80 per cent). The same pattern existed when considering cultural participation excluding reading, although the difference was slightly larger (42 per cent compared to 51 per cent).

Of those with long term conditions, whose daily capacity is reduced a lot participated less than those whose daily capacity is diminished a little. When the ability to carry out daily activities was only affected a little, the overall participation figure was only one percentage point lower than those with no long term condition. When reading was excluded this gap widened for both categories with a long term condition.

Figure 13.11: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by long term physical/mental health condition

2013 data, Adults (base (minimum): 1,140)

Figure 13.11: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by long term physical/mental health condition

Note that this question was asked in the survey from October (Q4) 2012

Frequency of participating in cultural activities

Table 13.10 shows that reading for pleasure was the cultural activity which respondents most frequently participated in. Of those that read for pleasure in the last year, 82 per cent stated that they read at least once a week with a further 9 per cent saying that they had read at least once a month. Using a computer or social media for creative work was also frequent amongst participants, with 71 per cent of those who participated having done so at least once a week. Over six in ten (64 per cent) of those who played a musical instrument or wrote music did so at least once a week. The general pattern for many other cultural activities was that although a relatively small proportion of adults participated in them, those who had participated often did so frequently (at least once a month). This contrasts with attendance at many cultural events or places, where a higher proportion of adults had attended, but less frequently.

Table 13.10: Frequency of participating in cultural activities in the last 12 months

Row percentages, 2013 data

Adults At least once a week Less often than once a week/at least once a month Less often than once a month/at least 3-4 times a year Twice in the last 12 months Once in the last 12 months Don't know Total Base
Read for pleasure (not newspapers, magazines or comics) 82 9 6 2 1 0 100 6,830
Used a computer/social media to produce creative work of any kind 71 14 8 5 2 1 100 2,030
Crafts such as knitting, wood, pottery, etc. 51 24 17 5 3 0 100 1,700
Dance - e.g. ceilidh, salsa, Highland dancing, ballet 23 19 28 19 11 0 100 1,160
Played a musical instrument or written music 64 21 10 3 2 0 100 1,010
Photography/making films or videos as an artistic activity (not family or holiday 'snaps') 33 36 21 7 3 0 100 950
Painting, drawing, printmaking or sculpture 41 29 19 7 3 1 100 950
Creative writing - stories, books, plays or poetry 40 22 23 8 5 1 100 450
Took part in a play/sang in a choir or other performance (not karaoke) 43 10 20 12 15 0 100 320
Other cultural activity 36 29 18 11 6 1 100 220

PARTICIPATION IN SPORT AND EXERCISE

This section contains data on the percentage of adults who participated in sport and exercise in the previous four weeks, as well as participation in specific activities over this time period. The Glossary (in Annex 2) provides a complete list of activities which are included. In some cases, information is provided for each of the years from 2007 to 2013 and figures are presented by age, gender, area deprivation and whether respondents have a long-standing illness, health problem or disability. Results are presented which show how frequently adults participate in sport and exercise in each of the years from 2007 to 2013. The report also provides some key messages on adults’ levels of satisfaction with local authority local authority sports and leisure facilities. In 2013, this chapter also reports on engagement among respondents with the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, reporting on how much people know about the Games and the ways they plan to get involved with the Games.

Sport is a fantastic way to get active, and as demonstrated by the spectacular success of the Commonwealth Games, it has the ability to engage and inspire the young and old, from grassroots through to elite performance. Sport also has a key role to play in addressing the problems caused by physical inactivity, which it is estimated results in around 2,500 premature deaths in Scotland each year and is estimated to cost the NHS around £91 million annually[121]. By doing so, sport contributes to a number of National Outcomes including “we live longer, healthier lives" and the associated National Indicator, to increase physical activity.

The Scottish Government is determined to ensure that we capitalise on the Commonwealth Games to create a lasting social, cultural and economic legacy for the whole of Scotland. In relation to sport particularly, the Scottish Government and Sportscotland will continue to develop Scotland’s world-class systems for sport and continue to invest in world-class facilities such as the National Performance Centre for Sport which will be completed in 2016. There will be a particular focus on encouraging greater equality of opportunity in relation to participation in sport and physical activity, and enhancing the role of community sport.

Participation in specific sports in the last four weeks

Figure 13.12 shows the percentage of adults who participated in sport and exercise in the previous four weeks in 2013. Over three quarters of adults (78 per cent) had participated in any sport in the last four weeks. By far the most prevalent activity was walking for 30 minutes (for recreational purposes) with two-thirds (65 per cent) of adults having done this in the last four weeks compared with fewer than one in five (20 per cent) undertaking any other individual activity. When walking was excluded, just over half of adults (52 per cent) had undertaken at least one of the remaining sports in the previous four weeks.

Figure 13.12: Participation in sport and exercise in the last four weeks

2013 data, Adults (base: 9,920)

Figure 13.12: Participation in sport and exercise in the last four weeks

Participation in sports – trends over time

Figure 13.13 shows the participation figures for sport and exercise amongst all adults in each year from 2007 to 2013. The percentage of adults who participated in sport and exercise in the previous four weeks remained broadly constant between 2007 and 2010 (between 72 per cent and 73 per cent), although there has been an increase in participation to a high of 78 per cent in 2013. This increase was largely attributable to a greater number of adults walking recreationally than ever before. When excluding walking, the sport and exercise participation figures have fluctuated between 51 per cent to 54 per cent between 2007 and 2013. In 2013, 52 per cent of adults reported participating in sport in the last four weeks, one percentage point higher than in 2012. The percentage of adults who walked for more than 30 minutes at a time in the last four weeks has seen a year-on-year increase every year from 2010 to 2013, increasing eleven percentage points from 54 per cent in 2010 to 65 per cent in 2013.

Figure 13.13: Participation in sport and exercise in the last four weeks

Percentages, 2007 to 2013 data

Figure 13.13: Participation in sport and exercise in the last four weeks

Table 13.11 shows the difference in the percentage of adults who participated in sport and exercise activities between 2007 and 2013. There hasn’t been a great deal of change in participation in most sports over this time period. The largest change (excluding walking at least 30 minutes) was dancing where participation decreased from 14 per cent in 2007 to 7 per cent in 2013. Participation in cycling increased by two percentage points since 2007 (from 9 per cent in 2007 to 11 per cent in 2013). There has been a trend in the last six years of increasing frequency of participation amongst those who do take part in sport and exercise, and this will be explored later in the chapter.

Table 13.11: Participation in sport and exercise in the last four weeks

Percentages, 2007 to 2013 data

Adults 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Any sporting participation (including walking) 73 73 72 72 75 74 78
Any sporting participation (excluding walking) 53 52 51 51 54 51 52
Walking (at least 30 minutes) 56 55 54 54 57 59 65
Swimming 19 19 17 17 18 17 17
Keep Fit/Aerobics 12 12 12 13 14 14 13
Multigym/Weight Training 11 11 11 11 12 12 12
Running/jogging 10 9 10 10 11 11 12
Cycling (at least 30 minutes) 9 9 9 9 10 10 11
Dancing 14 12 11 10 10 8 7
Football 9 8 9 9 8 7 8
Golf 9 8 8 7 8 6 7
Snooker/Billiards/Pool 9 9 8 7 7 5 6
Bowls 4 4 3 3 3 3 3
Other 9 10 6 8 10 10 10
None of these 27 27 28 28 25 26 22
Base 10,300 9,230 9,130 9,620 9,680 9,890 9,920

Columns add up to more than 100 per cent as multiple responses allowed

Figure 13.14 shows how sport and exercise participation in the previous four weeks has changed amongst different age groups from 2007 to 2013. As may be expected, sport and exercise participation decreases with age, peaking among 16 to 34 year olds before decreasing among 60 year olds and over. In 2013, between 86 per cent and 90 per cent of 16 to 44 year olds participated in sport and exercise in the last 4 weeks which is significantly higher than 68 per cent of 60 to 74 year olds and 46 per cent of adults aged 75 and over.

The differences between age groups were not as large as in 2007, having decreased from a difference of 51 percentage points to 44 percentage points in 2013. There has been a long term increase in participation in sport and exercise for adults aged 75 or more, from 36 per cent in 2007 to 46 per cent in 2013.

There has been an increase in participation between 2012 and 2013 among all age groups, particularly for those aged 16 to 34, with the 16 to 24 and 25 to 34 age groups having increased by five and six percentage points, respectively.

Figure 13.14: Participation in sport and exercise in the last four weeks, by age

Percentages, 2007 to 2013 data (base 2013 9,920, (minimum): 830)

Figure 13.14: Participation in sport and exercise in the last four weeks, by age

Figure 13.15 shows how the age breakdown of adults who participated in any sport and exercise other than walking in the previous four weeks changed over time from 2007 to 2013. Excluding walking as a sporting activity increases the differences between age groups, with the middle and older age groups having participated far less than younger age groups. The 16 to 24 age group report higher levels of participation than the other age groups. In 2013, 74 per cent of adults aged 16 to 24 participated in sport and exercise, other than walking, in the previous four weeks (eight percentage points higher than the 66 per cent of 25 to 24 year old who were the next highest group of participants).

The proportion of adults in different age groups participating in sport and exercise except walking in the last 4 weeks has remained relatively stable between 2012 and 2013 with no significant changes.

Figure 13.15: Participation in any sport (excluding walking) in the last four weeks, by age

Percentages, 2007 to 2013 data (base 2013 9,920, (minimum): 830)

Figure 13.15: Participation in any sport (excluding walking) in the last four weeks by age

Figure 13.16 shows how the age breakdown of adults who participated in walking in the previous four weeks changed over time from 2007 to 2013. The percentage of adults who walked more than 30 minutes at a time in the previous four weeks showed a smaller gap among the age groups for 16 to 74 year olds than for participation figures for any sport and exercise participation. In 2013, walking was most popular amongst those aged 25 to 34 (72 per cent), 35 to 44 (71 per cent) and 45 to 59 (69 per cent).

There has been an increase from 2012 to 2013 in the proportion of adults who walked for pleasure in the previous four weeks across all age groups, most notably among 16 to 24 year olds where there was an eleven percentage point increase (from 56 per cent in 2012 to 67 per cent in 2013).

Figure 13.16: Participation in walking in the last four weeks, by age

Percentages, 2007 to 2013 data (base 2013, 9,920, (minimum): 830)

Figure 13.16: Participation in walking in the last frou weeks, by age

Participation in sport and exercise by gender and age

Table 13.12 presents results on sport and exercise participation in the past four weeks by age and gender for 2013.

The main points are:

  • Overall sport and exercise participation was higher for men than women (81 per cent and 75 per cent respectively). This difference was larger when walking was excluded, with 58 per cent of men and 46 per cent of women having participated in sport and exercise other than walking. The proportions of both men and women who participated increased since 2012.
  • Walking for at least 30 minutes was the most popular form of participation for both men and women with both around two-thirds (66 per cent of women and 64 per cent of men). There were a number of specific sport/exercises in which participation by women was greater than men – swimming (19 per cent compared to 16 per cent), keep fit/aerobics (17 per cent compared to 9 per cent) and dancing (10 per cent compared to 4 per cent).
  • Participation in many other sports/exercises was higher amongst men than women. These included football (15 per cent compared to 1 per cent), running/jogging (15 per cent compared to 10 per cent), multigym/weight-training (16 per cent compared to 9 per cent) and golf (12 per cent compared to 2 per cent).
  • Some of the sport and exercise activities listed in Table 13.12 were most popular with younger adults. Playing football was particularly associated with age, with a quarter of adults aged 16 to 24 (24 per cent) having participated in the previous four weeks, compared with 3 per cent of 45 to 59 year olds. Running/jogging and weight-training also showed this same pattern of decreasing participation with age.
  • Some sports such as swimming and cycling showed much less of a pattern of with age and were most popular amongst adults aged 35 to 44 (27 per cent and 19 per cent, respectively).

Table 13.12: Participation in sport and exercise in the past four weeks by gender and age, 2013

Percentages, 2013 data

Adults Male Female 16 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 59 60 to 74 75 plus All
Any sporting participation (including walking) 81 75 89 90 86 79 68 46 78
Any sporting participation (excluding walking) 58 46 74 66 64 46 36 20 52
Walking (at least 30 minutes) 64 66 67 72 71 69 61 38 65
Swimming 16 19 21 24 27 14 12 4 17
Keep Fit /Aerobics 9 17 20 19 15 11 9 4 13
Multigym/Weight Training 16 9 25 22 15 9 4 1 12
Running/jogging 15 10 25 22 17 8 2 0 12
Cycling (at least 30 minutes) 14 8 11 12 19 13 6 1 11
Dancing 4 10 12 9 8 6 5 4 7
Football 15 1 24 13 8 3 1 - 8
Golf 12 2 5 6 7 8 7 4 7
Snooker/Billiards/Pool 10 2 12 9 7 4 2 1 6
Bowls 3 2 2 2 2 1 4 5 3
Other 12 8 17 10 10 10 6 3 10
None of these 19 25 11 10 14 21 32 54 22
Base 4,450 5,470 830 1,350 1,450 2,590 2,400 1,300 9,920

Columns add up to more than 100 per cent as multiple responses allowed

Participation in sport and exercise by area deprivation

Figure 13.17 shows how participation in sport varies by area deprivation. In 2013, participation by adults in any sport and exercise (including walking) in the previous four weeks varied according to the area deprivation that respondents live in (71 per cent of those in the 20 per cent most deprived areas of Scotland compared with 86 per cent in the 20 per cent least deprived areas). Variation in levels of sports participation by area deprivation was greater when walking was excluded (42 per cent in the 20 per cent most deprived areas, compared with 63 per cent in the 20 per cent least deprived areas).

Figure 13.17: Participation in Sport and Exercise in the last four weeks by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

2013 data, Adults (base (minimum): 1,760)

Figure 13.17: Participation in Sport and Exercise in the last four weeks by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

Table 13.13 shows that between 2012 and 2013 overall participation increased across all levels of area deprivation, the highest change being a six percentage point increase among adults in the 20 per cent most deprived areas of Scotland. This group also saw the largest increase in walking with an eight percentage point jump between 2012 and 2013 (50 per cent in 2012 to 58 per cent in 2013).

Table 13.13: Participation in Sport and Exercise in the last four weeks by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

Percentages, 2012 - 2013 data

Adults 2012 2013 2013 Base
Any sporting participation
(including walking)
Any sporting participation
(excluding walking)
Walking
(at least 30 minutes)
Any sporting participation
(including walking)
Any sporting participation
(excluding walking)
Walking
(at least 30 minutes)
Most deprived 20% 65 40 50 71 42 58 1,890
2nd 70 46 55 73 47 58 2,020
3rd 76 51 60 78 51 66 2,150
4th 79 56 64 82 56 70 2,100
Least deprived 20% 81 62 65 86 63 73 1,760
Scotland 74 51 59 78 52 65 9,920

Columns add up to more than 100 per cent as multiple responses allowed

Participation in sport and exercise by long-term physical/mental health condition

Figure 13.18 shows that those with a physical or mental health condition lasting or expected to last 12 months or more, were less likely to participate (56 per cent) than those without (86 per cent). The same pattern exists when looking at participation excluding walking, although the gap between those with and without a long term condition was smaller for walking at least 30 minutes recreationally.

Of those with long term conditions, those whose daily capacity is reduced a lot participated much less (36 per cent) when compared to those whose daily capacity is diminished a little (68 per cent). When the ability to carry out daily activities was affected a lot, the participation figure excluding walking was around half that of those whose ability to carry out day-to-day task was only affected a little (17 per cent compared to 34 per cent). This was also true of walking (28 per cent compared to 58 per cent).

Figure 13.18: Participation in sport and exercise in the last four weeks, by long term physical/mental health condition, 2013

Percentages, 2013 data (base (minimum): 1,140)

Figure 13.18: Participation in sport and exercise in the last four weeks, by long term physical/mental health condistion, 2013

This question was asked in the survey from October 2012 (Q4)

Frequency of participation in sport and exercise – trends over time

Figure 13.19 shows how the frequency of participation changed over time for those who participated in sport and exercise over the previous four weeks.

The frequency of participation among those who participated in sport and exercise increased over time since 2007. In 2007, over a third (36 per cent) of participants took part in sport and exercise regularly (on more than 15 days) in the four weeks prior to interview. In 2013, this figure had increased to 48 per cent. Conversely, the percentage of participants who took part in sport and exercise less frequently has fallen over this time period – in 2007, two-thirds (64 per cent) of participants took part in sport and exercise between 1 and 14 days in the month prior to interview while this figure had fallen to 53 per cent of participants in 2013. The trend among adults participating in sport and exercise is to participate more frequently than in the past.

Figure 13.19: Frequency of participation by adults who took part in sport and exercise in the previous four weeks

Percentages, 2007-2013 data (2013 base: 7,370)

Figure 13.19: Frequency of participation by adults who took part in sport and exercise in the previous four weeks

SATISFACTION WITH LOCAL AUTHORITY CULTURAL AND SPORTS SERVICES

Since 2007, questions have been asked in the Local Services suite of questions in the SHS on the frequency of use and satisfaction with local authority cultural and sport and leisure services. In particular, data are available on how frequently adults use council run sport and leisure facilities, libraries, museums and galleries and theatres and concert halls and on how satisfied they are with each of these services.

Table 13.14 provides data on levels of satisfaction with local authority cultural and sport and leisure services from 2007 to 2013. Of the four services, respondents (including non-users) were most satisfied with sports and leisure facilities and libraries (over 50 per cent of all respondents have been very or fairly satisfied since 2011). Levels of satisfaction with museums and galleries amongst all respondents varied between 38 per cent and 44 per cent in each of the years between 2007 and 2013. The year 2013 saw an increase in the satisfaction levels of respondents with all local authority culture and sports and leisure facilities. Satisfaction with sports and leisure facilities increased two percentage points from 2012 to 53 per cent, the highest level recorded since data was first collected in 2007. Theatres or concert halls and museums and galleries also recorded a 2 percentage point increase in satisfaction since 2012.

Table 13.14: Satisfaction with local authority culture and sport and leisure services

Column percentages, 2007 to 2013 data

Adults 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Sports and leisure facilities
Very/fairly satisfied 50 50 48 49 51 51 53
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 11 9 9 9 9 7 9
Very/fairly dissatisfied 9 8 8 8 8 5 6
No opinion 30 32 35 35 33 36 33
Libraries
Very/fairly satisfied 55 55 53 52 52 50 51
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 10 8 7 8 8 8 10
Very/fairly dissatisfied 3 2 2 3 2 2 2
No opinion 32 34 37 38 37 39 38
Museums and galleries
Very/fairly satisfied 41 42 41 38 44 42 44
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 14 12 10 11 10 10 11
Very/fairly dissatisfied 4 3 3 2 2 2 2
No opinion 41 42 45 48 44 46 42
Theatres or concert halls
Very/fairly satisfied 44 44 43 42 45 44 46
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 14 11 10 10 10 9 10
Very/fairly dissatisfied 5 4 4 3 3 2 2
No opinion 38 40 43 45 42 45 42
Base 10,220 9,240 9,710 9,020 9,660 9,890 9,920

Table 13.15 shows levels of satisfaction in local authority culture and sport and leisure services, amongst adults who have used these services in the past year. In 2013, the percentage of respondents who were very or fairly satisfied with each of the four services was around nine in ten (90 per cent) for all the services. Satisfaction levels amongst service users has remained at a similar level between 2012 and 2013. The percentage of respondents who were very or fairly dissatisfied with sports and leisure facilities was slightly higher than for other services in 2013 (6 per cent compared with a high of 3 per cent for other services), although levels have fallen from 2007, when 10 per cent of service users were very or slightly dissatisfied.

Table 13.15: Satisfaction with local authority culture and sport and leisure services. Service users within the past year only

Column percentages, 2007 to 2013 data

Adults 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Sports and leisure facilities
Very/fairly satisfied 82 83 82 82 85 88 88
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 7 6 6 6 5 5 5
Very/fairly dissatisfied 10 9 10 9 8 7 6
No opinion 1 1 1 2 2 1 2
Base 3,650 3,210 3,270 3,140 3,230 3,400 3,450
Libraries
Very/fairly satisfied 90 92 92 91 92 93 92
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 5 4 4 4 4 3 3
Very/fairly dissatisfied 3 3 3 4 2 2 3
No opinion 2 1 1 2 2 2 2
Base 4,090 3,510 3,590 3,400 3,510 3,450 3,370
Museums and galleries
Very/fairly satisfied 87 89 88 87 90 92 91
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 8 7 6 7 5 3 4
Very/fairly dissatisfied 2 2 3 2 1 2 2
No opinion 3 2 4 4 4 3 3
Base 2,870 2,630 2,720 2,460 2,830 2,800 2,980
Theatres or concert halls
Very/fairly satisfied 86 87 88 88 89 90 91
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 8 6 6 6 5 5 4
Very/fairly dissatisfied 3 4 3 3 3 2 2
No opinion 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Base 3,560 3,210 3,270 2,960 3,280 3,020 3,260

ENGAGEMENT WITH THE COMMONWEALTH GAMES 2014

In the summer of 2014 Scotland hosted a successful XX Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games. From the early stages of bidding there has been an emphasis on the positive and lasting benefits that could be achieved for both Scotland as a whole and for Glasgow. These benefits are often collectively described as the ‘legacy’.

Analysis presented in this chapter will add to the evidence base used on the legacy of the Commonwealth Games, and will feed into other publications and evidence around the Games. This includes national legacy reports over the next few years, the first of which is expected in summer 2015. Worthy of note is that the same questions are being asked in 2014.

Table 13.16 shows respondents intention to follow the Games in any way when given a list of five choices. Around four fifths of adults reported their intention to follow the Games (78 per cent), with watching on TV at home being the most popular method of keeping up with the Games (72 per cent). More than half (54 per cent) of adults intended to read about the Games in newspapers, either in print or online and nearly a fifth (17 per cent) of respondents intended watching the Games on public big screens.

Table 13.16: Ways adults intend to watch the Games

Percentages, 2013 data

Adults
Watch on TV at home 72
Listen on radio at home 16
Watch/listen on internet at home 20
Reading in newspapers online/offline 54
Watching live events on public big screens 17
Follow in any way 78
Base 9,920

Columns add up to more than 100 per cent as multiple responses allowed

Table 13.17 shows adults’ intentions to get actively involved in the Games and Games related events in any way. Around a third of adults intended to actively engage with the Games (32 per cent), with attending events being the most popular form of involvement; 17 per cent of adults intended to attend a ticketed Games event and 15 per cent of adults intended to attend a free Games event. One in twenty (5 per cent) adults believed they would be able to utilise new or improved sports facilities linked to the Games. We might expect to see these numbers increase in the 2014 Scottish Household Survey as the impact of the Games take effect.

Table 13.17: Ways adults intend to get involved in the games

Percentages, 2013 data

Adults
Attending free Games event 15
Attending ticketed Games event 17
Games related sports/physical activity 2
Using new/improved sports facility linked to the Games 5
Games related employment 1
Taking part in Games related cultural event/activity 2
Volunteering during the Games 3
Taking part in Games related community event/activity 2
None of the above 68
Get involved in any way 32
Base 9,920

Columns add up to more than 100 per cent as multiple responses allowed

Table 13.8 shows whether respondents thought that the Games will provide any lasting benefit either to themselves and their family, or their local area by urban rural classification. Overall, around four in ten adults (41 per cent) believed that Scotland hosting the Games would provide lasting benefits (either to them and their family or their local area) with more adults saying this in large urban areas (48 per cent) than in remote small towns and remote rural areas (both around 27 per cent).

Full local authority tables are due to be published after the publication of the main SHS report. However, analysis of the expected benefits by local authority area has indicated that, in 2013, the proportion of adults that believed that the Games will have a lasting benefit to themselves and their family or their local area was felt strongly in and around Glasgow where around six in ten adults (58 per cent) in Glasgow expected the Games to provide a lasting benefit. This is significantly higher than the national figure of 41 per cent. The data reported here is for 2013, so is reporting expectations before the experience of the Games themselves.

Table 13.18: Will there be any lasting benefits of the games?

Percentages, 2013 Data

Adults Large urban areas Other urban areas Accessible small towns Remote small towns Accessible rural Remote rural All
To you and your family or your local area? 48 39 38 27 36 27 41
To you and your family? 33 29 30 20 29 20 30
To your local area? 36 28 25 19 21 16 29
Base 3,300 3,010 910 610 1,060 1,030 9,920

Columns add up to more than 100 per cent as multiple responses allowed


Contact

Email: Andrew Craik