Publication - Statistics

Persistent Poverty in Scotland 2010-2018

Estimates of the proportion of people living in persistent poverty in Scotland between 2010 and 2018.

17 page PDF

633.8 kB

17 page PDF

633.8 kB

Contents
Persistent Poverty in Scotland 2010-2018
Key points

17 page PDF

633.8 kB

Key points

The statistics in this report provide information on persistent poverty in Scotland. They are taken from the Understanding Society survey and so, as is true for all statistics derived from survey data, the statistics are subject to a degree of error. This means that implied changes over the years and between UK countries may not be significant and instead be within a given error range. More information can be found in the Background Notes and Methodology section.

Some estimates from previous years have been improved and will therefore differ between publications. The latest publication provides the most accurate estimates.

All individuals

  • Between 2014 and 2018, 13% of people in Scotland were in persistent poverty after housing costs. This compares to 12% in 2013-2017. 

Children

  • Between 2014 and 2018, 17% of children in Scotland were in persistent poverty after housing costs. This compares to 15% in 2013-2017.
  • Children have consistently had a higher risk of living in persistent poverty after housing costs than working-age adults and pensioners in Scotland.

Working-age adults

  • Between 2014 and 2018, 11% of working-age adults in Scotland were in persistent poverty after housing costs. This compares to 10% in 2013-2017.

Pensioners

  • Between 2014 and 2018, 12% of pensioners in Scotland were in persistent poverty after housing costs. This compares to 11% in 2013-2017.

Scotland compared to other UK countries

  • When looking at the overall population, Scotland had similar levels of persistent poverty after housing costs to England and Wales (all 13%), and slightly higher rates than Northern Ireland (11%). 
  • The persistent child poverty rate after housing costs in Scotland and Northern Ireland (both 17%) was lower than in England (20%) and Wales (19%). This has been consistent over time. 
  • Persistent pensioner poverty after housing costs in Scotland (12%) was slightly higher compared to England and Wales (both 11%) and considerably higher compared to Northern Ireland (5%)

Contact

Email: social-justice-analysis@gov.scot