Publication - Impact assessment

Milk and Healthy Snack Scheme (Scotland) Regulations 2021: equality impact assessment

This Equality Impact Assessment (EQIA) was conducted in relation to the Milk and Healthy Snack Scheme (Scotland) Regulations 2021 which will replace the application of the 1996 Regulations and UK Nursery Milk Scheme in Scotland from 1 August 2021.

13 page PDF

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13 page PDF

298.5 kB

Contents
Milk and Healthy Snack Scheme (Scotland) Regulations 2021: equality impact assessment
Key Findings

13 page PDF

298.5 kB

Key Findings

The evidence in respect of the Scottish Milk and Healthy Snack Scheme and the potential impact on particular groups are laid out for the following groups:

Age

Key facts:

  • In 2018/19, 22.4% of 4-5 year olds in Scotland were recorded as either overweight or obese.
  • In 2018, 15% of children aged 2-15 met the five-a-day recommendation for consumption of fruit and vegetables. Boys and girls were equally likely to meet the recommendations, with 15% of girls and 16% of boys having done so.
  • Mean consumption (of fruit and vegetable) in 2018 was 2.8 portions for both boys and girls. Mean consumption for all children aged 2-15 has been between 2.6 portions and 2.9 portions a day for all years since 2008.
  • The proportion of children consuming no fruit and vegetables has remained fairly constant since 2008.
  • In 2018, 10% of children aged 2-15 (11% of boys and 9% of girls) consumed no fruit or vegetables on a typical day.
  • In 2017, 12% of children aged 2-15 from the most deprived areas had the recommended 5 portions of fruit and vegetables the previous day, compared to 21% in the least deprived areas.
  • In 2017/2018, 58% of girls and 53% of boys ages 2-15 consumed skimmed or semi-skimmed milk.
  • Between the ages of 1 and 2 years, children should be given whole milk and dairy products because they may not get the calories or essential vitamins they need from lower fat alternatives.
  • After the age of 2, children can gradually move to semi-skimmed milk as a drink, as long as they're eating a varied and balanced diet and growing well.
  • Children between the ages of 1 and 3 need to have around 350mg of calcium a day. About 300ml of milk (just over half a pint) would provide this.
  • In 2017/2018, 16% of children aged 2-15 consumed non-diet soft drinks daily, down from 35% in 2015/2016 and 38-39% in the years 2008/2009 to 2013/2014.
  • Evidence review carried out by Food Standards Scotland identified other options for children who do not drink animal milk. This was carried out due to the desire in the Welfare Foods Consultation to have an alternative drink to cow's milk.

Disability

We acknowledge that food allergy/intolerances are not a disability but more of a long term health condition and is reflected as such but positioned under the disability heading of this EQIA

Key facts:

  • Most food allergies affect younger children under the age of three. It's estimated around 1 in every 14 children of this age has at least one food allergy.
  • In children, the foods that most commonly cause an allergic reaction are milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish and shellfish
  • Cows' milk allergy (CMA), also called cows' milk protein allergy, is one of the most common childhood allergies. It is estimated to affect around 7% of babies under 1, though most children grow out of it by the age of 5.
  • Although the number of registrations for funded ELC for children assessed or declared disabled has gone down slightly between 2017 and 2018 (from 1130 to 1050), the percentage of children declared as disabled has remained broadly stable; it was 1.2% for 2017 and 1.1% for 2018.

Sex

Key facts:

  • There is currently no information currently available on the sex of children accessing ELC. The high general uptake of 3 and 4 year old places suggests that take up is likely to be high for both girls and boys.
  • In 2018, 15% of children aged 2-15 met the five-a-day recommendation for consumption of fruit and vegetables. Boys and girls were equally likely to meet the recommendations, with 15% of girls and 16% of boys having done so.
  • Mean consumption (of fruit and vegetable) in 2018 was 2.8 portions for both boys and girls. Mean consumption for all children aged 2-15 has been between 2.6 portions and 2.9 portions a day for all years since 2008.
  • The proportion of children consuming no fruit and vegetables has remained fairly constant since 2008. In 2018, 10% of children aged 2-15 (11% of boys and 9% of girls) consumed no fruit or vegetables on a typical day.
  • In 2017/2018, 58% of girls and 53% of boys ages 2-15 drank skimmed or semi-skimmed milk.

Pregnancy and Maternity

Pregnancy and maternity is not deemed to be directly correlated to this policy.

Gender reassignment

Gender reassignment is not deemed to be directly correlated to this policy.

Sexual orientation

Sexual orientation is not deemed to be directly correlated to this policy.

Race

Key facts:

  • No information is currently collected on race of children accessing funded ELC.
  • In the UK, lactose intolerance is more common in people of Asian or African-Caribbean descent.
  • There was a significant association between fruit and vegetable consumption and ethnic group. White British respondents were the least likely to eat 5-a day (21%). Conversely, White Other (40%, 4.6 mean portions), Pakistani (48%, 4.8 mean portions), Chinese (49%, 5.2 mean portions), Asian Other (51%, 5.0 mean portions) and Other ethnic groups (46%, 5.0 mean portions) were all significantly higher than the national average (22%, 3.2 mean portions) in terms of their consumption of 5 or more portions per day.

Religion or Belief

  • The number of vegans in Great Britain quadrupled between 2014 and 2019. In 2019 there were 600,000 vegans, or 1.16% of the population; 276,000 (0.46%) in 2016; and 150,000 (0.25%) in 2014.
  • Data from the 2011 census shows that the five most common religious affiliations are Christian (59.3%), Muslim (4.8%), Hindu (1.5%), Sikh (0.8%) and Jewish (0.5%).
  • The predominant religion in the UK is Christianity. Generally there are no dietary restrictions. Individuals may choose to forgo alcohol and may choose whether or not to eat meat. During Lent Christians may stop eating certain foods.
  • Muslims eat halal (lawful) foods, which include fruit, vegetables and eggs. Any meat and meat products they consume must be from a halal slaughtered animal. Milk and dairy foods are halal, cheese may be halal depending on ingredients.
  • The majority of Hindus are lacto-vegetarian (avoiding meat and eggs), although some may eat lamb, chicken or fish. Some Hindus do not eat ghee, milk, onions, eggs, coconut, garlic, domestic fowl or salted pork.
  • Some Sikhs are vegetarian.
  • Jewish food must be suitable and pure. Kosher does not restrict foods from any particular food group.

Marriage and Civil Partnership

The Scottish Government does not require assessment against this protected characteristic unless the policy or practice relates to work, for example HR policies and practices - refer to Definitions of Protected Characteristics document for details.


Contact

Email: Philip.Canavan@gov.scot