Publication - Research and analysis

Growing up in Scotland: overweight and obesity at age 10

Published: 26 Nov 2018

The report uses data from the Growing Up in Scotland study to investigate trajectories of overweight and obesity during the primary school years and identify key risk factors.

79 page PDF

1.1 MB

79 page PDF

1.1 MB

Contents
Growing up in Scotland: overweight and obesity at age 10
Footnotes

79 page PDF

1.1 MB

Footnotes

1. Slight differences in the figures between this and the 2012 report occur because the sample being analysed and the weights used for analysis vary between the two reports. For this report the age 6 sample is restricted to those who also provided data at age 10.

2. Available from: http://nationalperformance.gov.scot

3. https://www.gov.scot/Publications/2018/10/6984/0

4. See https://www.eatbetterfeelbetter.co.uk/

5. Schools (Health Promotion and Nutrition) (Scotland) Act 2007

6. https://consult.gov.scot/support-and-wellbeing/food-and-drink-in-schools/

7. http://www.gov.scot/About/Performance/scotPerforms/partnerstories/Outcomes-Framework?_ga=2.87871900.565990737.1526569500-747484107.1526034304

8. See https://sportscotland.org.uk/schools/active-schools/

9. See https://sportscotland.org.uk/clubs/what-is-a-community-sport-hub/

10. See http://legacy2014.co.uk/legacy-in-action/funding-for-physical-activity

11. See https://beta.gov.scot/news/scotland-a-daily-mile-nation/

12. The Frankfort Plane is an imaginary line passing through the external ear canal and across the top of the lower bone of the eye socket, immediately under the eye. Participants' heads are positioned with the Frankfort Plane in a horizontal position when height is measured using a stadiometer as a means of ensuring that, as far as possible, the measurements taken are standardised.

13. The NCMP is a child health surveillance programme which measures the height and weight of children in England in the first (Reception, age 4-5) and final (Year 6, age 10-11) years of primary school.

14. Children who were underweight at age 6 were not included given the small base sizes

15. The income measure used here was collected at the age 10 data collection

16. Area deprivation measured using the 2012 Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

17. Very few children were reported as never eating breakfast meaning the base size for this group is particularly small (<50). As such, results for the never group should be interpreted with caution.

18. 63% of children were regularly participating in sport at age 6 and 74% were doing so at age 8.

19. As advised by NHS Choices from recommendations by the Millpond Children's Sleep Clinic, https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Childrenssleep/Pages/howmuchsleep.aspx

20. Full results are shown in Table A-1 in the Appendix

21. Full results are shown in Table A-2 in the Appendix

22. Full results are shown in Table A-3 in the Appendix

23. Full results are shown in Table A-4 in the Appendix

24. That is, the significance level or 'p-value' was just outside the 0.05/95% cut-off.

25. Full results are shown in Table A-5 in the Appendix

26. In the model predicting moving into overweight, area deprivation – a measure of social background – was statistically significantly associated with moving into overweight in the cross-sectional analyses and therefore included in the multivariable model. There was no need to include the other social background measures. For moving out of overweight, none of the social background variables were significant in the cross-sectional analyses. It was therefore not possible to choose a single social background measure to include in the model. As such, all measures were included in order that differences in social background were controlled for.

27. Full results are shown in Table A-6 in the Appendix


Contact

Email: Ewan Patterson