Publication - Advice and guidance

NHS Scotland learning disability employment: tools and guidance - easy read version

Easy read version of tools and guidance to support NHS Scotland to increase the number of the people employed with learning disabilities.

NHS Scotland learning disability employment: tools and guidance - easy read version
3. Creating a Supportive Environment

3. Creating a Supportive Environment

A diverse group of NHS staff

NHSScotland Boards have to help create an inclusive and welcoming environment for people to work in. Organisations need to look at how their staff can help to create a supportive environment for employees with learning disabilities.

Staff Equality and Diversity Training

A diverse group of NHS staff, looking happy

All NHSScotland Boards have to show that staff are:

  • Well informed
  • Properly trained and experienced
An information sign
  • Given information so they can make the right decisions
  • Treated fairly by everyone with dignity and respect, in an environment where diversity is valued
A diverse group of NHS staff. One is looking at a computer screen and the other two are standing by his side. All are looking happy
  • Given a good and safe working environment, which adds to the health and wellbeing of staff, patients and the wider community.

A woman wearing a name badge is pointing to a board with ‘Training’ written on it. A group of people are sitting in front of her and watching

Training in NHSScotland Boards already exists, but more training about learning disability would be helpful.

A man looking thoughtful. A though bubble is coming from his head with a happy face in it

Important parts of the training would be:

  • removing wrong ideas about learning disabilities
  • organisations that get it right for people with a learning disability will be better at supporting other disabilities
A piece of paper with pictures of six different people on it. A hand is pointing to one of the people
  • when managers give work to people with a range of different skills, they get better at picking jobs that fit employee's strengths and make the team stronger
A woman wearing a name badge looking thoughtful. There is a thought bubble coming out of her head with a question mark in it
  • everyone is different
  • be flexible and inclusive when employing staff
  • know about 'reasonable adjustments'
A hand holding a sheet of paper with pictures of nine people on it. All of the people look different from each other
  • communicating in an accessible way
  • being proud of learning disabilities within the organisation.
A woman is standing next to a board with ‘Training’ written on it. A man is standing at the other side, pointing at the board. A group of people are sitting in front of the board, watching.”

Think about involving people with a learning disability as part of your training.

Staff Engagement Groups

A diverse group of staff are sitting at a table, chatting and looking happy

Staff engagement groups are a good way of supporting staff to give their views. They can be a safe space for sharing experiences of work; thinking through what is working well, and not so well; learning from their experiences; and coming up with ideas.

A woman is talking with a speech bubble coming from her mouth. Next to her there is an ear, listening

Listening to staff will help managers find out if additional support is needed.

A woman wearing a name badge looking thoughtful. There is a thought bubble coming out of her head with a question mark in it

Some things to think about when setting up a Staff Engagement Group:

  • Should the group have a leader?
  • How does the group report back to the management team?
  • Is there a place set aside for the group to meet?
  • Give staff the time to go to the meetings.

Learning Disability Champions

A man wearing a rosette on his chest

Learning disability champions are volunteers who are the best people to talk to about learning disabilities in their organisation, and they show other workers the best way to do things.

An information sign

This includes giving information about learning disabilities to colleagues, raising awareness and working with other organisations.

A woman wearing a rosette on her chest, giving support to a man with a name badge

A Learning Disability Champion would be in charge of:

  • Looking after the safety and wellbeing of employees with learning disabilities
A woman reading a booklet with an information sign on the cover. Next to her there is a happy face and a thumbs up symbol
  • Sharing what they've learned about the best way to do things across the organisation

A tick and a happy face

  • Making sure communications are in an accessible format

A woman wearing a name badge is pointing to a board with ‘Training’ written on it. A group of people are sitting in front of her and watching

  • Supporting the training and employment of employees with learning disabilities

A diverse group of staff are sitting at a table, chatting and looking happy

  • Working with employees with a learning disability, managers and staff groups

A man wearing a rosette on his chest, introducing two other members of staff

  • Supporting colleagues who are new to working with someone with a learning disability.

Individual Support

A woman wearing a rosette on her chest, giving support to a man with a name badge

Someone with a learning disability might need more individual support for different parts of their role. This could be during training and induction or when doing some parts of their job.


Contact

Email: emma.weedon@gov.scot