Publication - Research and analysis

Attitudes Towards Youth Crime and Willingness to Intervene: Findings from the 2006 Scottish Social Attitudes Survey

Published: 4 Feb 2008
Part of:
Education
ISBN:
ISBN97807559

This report presents findings from a module of questions included in the 2006 Scottish Social Attitudes survey and revisits a theme first addressed by survey in 2004, namely public attitudes towards young people and youth crime.

65 page PDF

0 B

65 page PDF

0 B

Contents
Attitudes Towards Youth Crime and Willingness to Intervene: Findings from the 2006 Scottish Social Attitudes Survey
CONTENTS

65 page PDF

0 B

Simon Anderson and Fiona Dobbie, Scottish Centre for Social Research
ISBN 978 0 7559 6960 9 (Web only publication)
ISSN 0950 2254
This document is also available in pdf format (520k)
This Full Report is accompanied by Research findings

CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION
Introduction
Background
Format of the report and reporting conventions
The data

CHAPTER TWO TRUST, CONNECTEDNESS AND INTER-GENERATIONAL CONTACT
Introduction
Measures of reciprocity and connectedness
Social trust
Measures of inter-generational contact
Key points

CHAPTER THREE VIEWS OF YOUNG PEOPLE AND YOUTH CRIME
Introduction
Key points

CHAPTER FOUR AVOIDANCE BEHAVIOUR AND WILLINGNESS TO INTERVENE
Introduction
Avoidance behaviour
Willingness to intervene: risks posed by young people
Key points

CHAPTER FIVE CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS

REFERENCES

ANNEX A -TECHNICAL DETAILS OF THE SURVEY
The Scottish Social Attitudes series
The 2006 survey
Technical details of the survey
Analysis variables
Analysis techniques
Regression models

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1 - Measures of social connectedness/reciprocity
Table 2 - Social connectedness by key variables (row percentages)
Table 3 - Social trust by key variables (row percentages)
Table 4 - Reasons for contact with young people in area (%)
Table 5 - Agreement/disagreement with statements about young people (%)
Table 6 - General attitudes towards young people by key variables (row percentages)
Table 7 - Perceptions of prevalence of local youth crime problems (%)
Table 8 - Perceptions of prevalence of youth crime problems, by key variables (row percentages)
Table 9 - Extent to which 'directly affected' by local youth crime problems (%)
Table 10 - Extent to which 'directly affected' by local youth crime problems by key variables (row percentages)
Table 11 - Avoidance behaviour when faced with group of teenagers outside shop by key variables (row percentages)
Table 12 - Likelihood of different actions in the face of teenagers vandalising bus shelter (%)
Table 13 - Reasons for reluctance to speak to teenagers directly by gender of teenagers (%)

LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1 - Social trust - "most people can be trusted" - by age group and gender (%)
Figure 2 - Resident in household containing young person (%)
Figure 3 - Contact with 11 to 15 year-olds in area by age group (%)
Figure 4 - Contact with 16 to 24 year-olds in area by age group (%)
Figure 5 - Contact with 11 to 15 year-olds in area by 'social connectedness' scale (%)
Figure 6 - Perceptions of prevalence of youth crime by area deprivation (%)
Figure 7 - Perceived prevalence versus direct effects of youth crime-related problems (%)
Figure 8 - How feel about walking past group of teenagers to get to shop (%)
Figure 9 - Feel very uncomfortable/avoid altogether by age group and gender (%)
Figure 10 - 'Very likely' to take different actions (14 year-old boys/girls combined) by respondent's gender (%)
Figure 11 - 'Very likely' to take different actions (14 year-old boys only) by respondent's gender (%)
Figure 12 - 'Very likely' to take different actions (14 year-old girls only) by respondent's gender (%)
Figure 13 - 'Very likely' to take challenge directly (14 year-old boys/girls combined) by level of contact with 11 to 15 year-olds in area (%)
Figure 14 - 'Very likely' to take challenge directly (14 year-old boys/girls combined) by social connectedness scale (%)
Figure 15 - 'Very likely' to challenge directly or very likely to call police (14 year-old boys/girls combined) by urban-rural classification (%)
Figure 16 - Reasons for reluctance to intervene directly (14 year-old girls only) by respondent's gender (%)
Figure 17 - Reasons for reluctance to intervene directly (14 year-old boys only) by respondent's gender (%)
Figure 18 - Most likely action in scenario involving 10 year-old boy/girl (%)
Figure 19 - Most likely action in scenario involving 10 year-old boy/girl by gender of respondent (%)
Figure 20 - Most likely action in scenario involving 10 year-old boy/girl - male respondents only (%)
Figure 21 - Most likely action in scenario involving 10 year-old boy/girl - female respondents only (%)
Figure 22 - Reasons for reluctance to intervene directly (10 year-old boy only) by respondent's gender (%)
Figure 23 - Reasons for reluctance to intervene directly (10 year-old girl only) by respondent's gender (%)

The views expressed in this report are those of the researcher and
do not necessarily represent those of the Department or Scottish Ministers.

This report is available on the Scottish Government Social Research website only
www.scotland.gov.uk/socialresearch.