Publication - Consultation analysis

Developing an environment strategy for Scotland: analysis of responses to online discussion

Published: 16 Feb 2019
Directorate:
Environment and Forestry Directorate
Part of:
Environment and climate change
ISBN:
9781787815889

Independent analysis of responses to our June to August 2018 online discussion that sought views to help inform the development of an Environment Strategy for Scotland.

66 page PDF

1.4 MB

66 page PDF

1.4 MB

Contents
Developing an environment strategy for Scotland: analysis of responses to online discussion
Appendix 4: Knowledge Accounts - Additional Quotes

66 page PDF

1.4 MB

Appendix 4:  Knowledge Accounts - Additional Quotes 

A sample of illustrative quotes that typify the themes identified in responses to the Knowledge Account: Air Quality

We consider that following the UK’s withdrawal from the EU, it is important that there is an effective body in place to ensure that air quality targets are met, in particular the requirements of the Directive on Ambient Air Quality and Cleaner Air for Europe. [Law Society of Scotland]

The Air Quality Position Statement needs to provide a clearer picture of where we are now, i.e. specific information on what the levels of pollutants mean in relation to targets.  Where we want to get to is also very vague. [Transition Edinburgh]

Behaviour change programmes are a vital component that need run in parallel to support the development of new infrastructure. [Paths for All]

The air quality knowledge account does not cite planning as one the tools available for driving change, instead focusing on technological transformation. [RTPI Scotland]

While the focus on reducing emissions is understandable, we would suggest that this account also needs to address action to mitigate the effects of air pollution where it is occurring – green infrastructure (street trees, green walls etc.) has a role to play in such mitigation particularly in the lead up to some of the reduction measures taking effect. [Central Scotland Green Network Trust]

A sample of illustrative quotes that typify the themes identified in responses to the Knowledge Account: Business Resource Efficiency

To achieve a sustainable footprint for our production and consumption, we need to aim for reduced consumption of finite resources to sustainable levels.  We strongly recommend that reduced consumption, rather than increased efficiency, is the top line for these knowledge accounts. [Scottish Environment LINK]

If you do not want a throwaway culture then goods/ products need to be better quality and built to last - laws and regulations can ensure this. Bring out more Consumer Protection laws that create a 'built to last' culture. [Individual]

A sample of illustrative quotes that typify the themes identified in responses to the Knowledge Account: Household Resource Efficiency

Overall, this knowledge account places almost all the responsibility on the consumer, rather than the producer – it's contrary to the pollution at source principle. [Scottish Wildlife Trust]

It would be useful to mention design for longevity as well as design for recycling/recovery. [Scottish Environment LINK]

A sample of illustrative quotes that typify the themes identified in responses to the Knowledge Account: Natural Capital

The focus only on natural capital may reflect the extent of policy investment in this form of green accounting, but it can be reasonably argued that this, on its own, fails to explain and draw together the various threads of a strategy for the environment. [Nautilus Consultants]Scotland needs to bring its legislation and regulation, on all fronts, into line with the circular economy agenda to ensure that recycling, re-use and re-manufacturing are encouraged and enabled rather than hindered. [Chartered Institute of Wastes Management].

It is not sufficient to identify landscapes as an important asset in the environmental strategy narrative but to then assume they are properly valued by including very indirect assessment in the Value the Environment Knowledge Account - the only knowledge account to refer to landscapes. [John Muir Trust]

A sample of illustrative quotes that typify the themes identified in responses to the Knowledge Account: Ecosystems and Wildlife

Effort should be made to emphasise / re-emphasise that biodiversity and ecosystems are characteristics of the domestic and urban environments just as they are of rural and countryside areas. [Nautilus Consultants]

The focus of the paper appears to be on special sites and species rather than reflecting the wider ecosystems approach which looks at the health of the ecosystem in general. [Law Society of Scotland]

It is important that government and organisations implement whole lifecycle analysis and consider the total impact of potential solutions before making decisions. Factors such as CO₂ emissions, water usage and the impact on communities, as well as the impact on local, national and international ecosystems should all be considered.

This section largely ignores the marine environment…. The increase of aquaculture in Scotland over the last 40 years has had a significant impact on the marine ecosystem. [Natural Hydration Council]

A sample of illustrative quotes that typify the themes identified in responses to the Knowledge Account: Quality Green Space

The reference to climate change in ‘future drivers’ is confusing since it focuses on river flows and drought and makes no explicit reference to greenspace. A focus on the impacts of warmer wetter winters, extreme weather events and increased flood risk would seem more sensible and would highlight the role of greenspace as green infrastructure. Well designed and located greenspace can reduce the impacts of increased temperature in urban areas in the summer months. Climate change is also likely to lead to an increase in the need for greenspace for recreational purposes. [Central Scotland Green Network Trust]

While housing demand could increase pressure on greenspace, the integration of green infrastructure elements into new housing has the potential to increase the provision of quality greenspace. [Central Scotland Green Network Trust]

Whilst there are gaps in relation to understanding the pathways linking urban greenspace to improved health and wellbeing, as currently drafted the infographic could give a misleading summary of the current state/status of greenspace and health research. [Greenspace Scotland]

A sample of illustrative quotes that typify the themes identified in responses to the Knowledge Account: Value the Environment

“Value the environment” seems as though it should be an encompassing framing that includes all other areas presented. Ecosystems and wildlife should be considered more carefully in relation to the natural capital knowledge account, perhaps merged, to ensure appropriate synergy between competing aims (what appears to be a focus on biodiversity/nature for itself on the one hand and nature to be used on the other). All terms presented also need to be adequately defined. [Department for Social Responsibility and Sustainability, University of Edinburgh]

As part of valuing the environment, we believe it is important to track public understanding and respect for nature. With improvements in appreciation, the more people can contribute to local and national environment strategies.  We feel there is considerable scope to develop suitable educational, vocational and public awareness programmes to deliver appreciation. [Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust]

A sample of illustrative quotes that typify the themes identified in responses to the Knowledge Account: Access to Nature

In this knowledge account the definition of nature is not accurate, as outdoor recreation areas can be barren of diversity. Nature should include plants, animals and natural physical features [The Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management]

Overall, we would encourage this knowledge account to acknowledge how ‘access’ as a public good is reduced as a public good by congestion effects, which risks reducing the ‘purity’ or ‘publicness’ of this ecosystem service. [Scottish Wildlife Trust]

There is only one mention of wildlife in this knowledge account. People access nature not just to walk their dog, go for walks, or to relax but also to observe and watch wildlife and discover new things. It is important that good quality habitat exists so that this can continue and that more people are encouraged to visits new sites to see wildlife. This can help encourage people to get involved with citizen science projects, the recording of species and learning new things [Buglife - The Invertebrate Conservation Trust]

Findings emerging from research show the need to go beyond considering outdoor recreation behaviour as simply an outcome of the balance between barriers and motivations. [James Hutton Institute]


Contact

Email: Susie.Turpie@gov.scot