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Ethnicity and justice - academic management: research mapping

Outlines previous, current and future research projects around ethnicity and justice from a survey of academics and researchers in Scotland. Conducted on behalf of the Cross Justice Working Group on Race Data and Evidence.


Annex 3: Previous Research Projects.

Table 3a:

Project Title and Brief Description: A confident approach in responding to the needs of domestically abused South Asian women – Laying the foundations for Police Scotland 2026 Strategy - grant funding from the Scottish Institute for Policing Research in October 2017 to consider the interaction between Police Scotland and women from a minority ethnic background experiencing domestic abuse. The research was published in December 2018.

Respondent’s Institution

Hemat Gryffe Women's Aid

Topics covered

  • Experience of crime and feelings of safety
  • Police
  • Courts

Included in 2020 research audit?

Yes

Permission to re-contact?

Yes

Table 3b:

Project Title and Brief Description: Analysis of Stop and Search data for the Independent Advisory Group on Stop and Search (previous) not in receipt of funding - I carried out extensive analysis of stop and search data, including ethnic profile of searches, over a 2 year period while the IAGSS was undertaking its review of the changing legislation and introduction of the code of practice. Findings were published in several reports for the IAGSS.

Respondent’s Institution

University of Edinburgh, School of Law

Topics covered

  • Police

Included in 2020 research audit?

Yes

Permission to re-contact?

Yes

Table 3c:

Project Title and Brief Description: CJSW Briefing paper on Race and Hate Crime

Respondent’s Institution

University of Strathclyde, School of Social Work and Social Policy

Topics covered

  • Experience of crime and feelings of safety

Included in 2020 research audit?

No – pre-2010

Permission to re-contact?

No

Table 3d:

Diversity in Policing: An Evaluation of the Introduction to Policing Programme within Police Scotland

This research report produced for Police Scotland draws upon semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 16 minority ethnic and religious recruits to examine the following objectives:

  • To explore perceptions about policing and Police Scotland;
  • To examine the importance attached to the Introduction to Policing programme in the decision to join Police Scotland
  • To assess the role of the Positive Action team in supporting minority ethnic and religious recruits
  • To investigate the working environment within Police Scotland and its perceived openness to minority ethnic and religious recruits

Status: Published and Submitted to Police Scotland (September 2019).

Unfunded Research.

Respondent’s Institution

Glasgow Caledonian University, Department of Management and HRM

Topics covered

  • Police

Included in 2020 research audit?

No

Permission to re-contact?

Yes

Table 3e:

Experiences and Perceptions of Community Safety in Scotland

  • Previous research by SCSN and Scottish Government into how different groups (incl. BAME) feel safe, worry, fear and experience crime to different degrees. There are still major data gaps in research into this area which need addressed, especially in population studies.

Findings in link.

Respondent’s Institution

Scottish Community Safety Network

Topics covered

  • Experience of crime and feelings of safety
  • Police
  • Courts

Included in 2020 research audit?

No – published since audit

Permission to re-contact?

Yes

Table 3f:

Fear of crime: survey exploring measurement and collecting additional data from EM households.

ESRC funded in 1990s.

Report published in Scotland and various papers by Ditton et al 1994 onwards.

Respondent’s Institution

University of Edinburgh, Clinical Psychology

Topics covered

  • Experience of crime and feelings of safety

Included in 2020 research audit?

No – pre-2010

Permission to re-contact?

No

Table 3g:

Refugee’ is only a word: A discursive analysis of refugees’ and asylum seekers’ experiences in Scotland. Kirkwood, S. (2012). PhD thesis, the University of Edinburgh. This previous (unfunded) research looked at the experiences of asylum seekers and refugees around integration in Scotland. It included analysis of accounts of experiences of racially motivated violence, published here:

Kirkwood, S., McKinlay, A. & McVittie, C. (2013). 'They're more than animals': Refugees' accounts of racially motivated violence. British Journal of Social Psychology, 52, 747-762.

Respondent’s Institution

The University of Edinburgh, Social Work

Topics covered

  • Experience of crime and feelings of safety

Included in 2020 research audit?

Yes

Permission to re-contact?

Yes

Table 3h:

South Asian Women & Domestic Abuse in Scotland: an uncertain legal status and no recourse to public funds.

Self-funded PhD, achieved in 2017

Respondent’s Institution

Hemat Gryffe Women's Aid

Topics covered

  • Experience of crime and feelings of safety
  • Police
  • Courts

Included in 2020 research audit?

No

Permission to re-contact?

Yes

Table 3i:

Understanding the needs of victim/survivors of IPV in Glasgow

PHD study ... unfunded ... reports to police in relation to their response

Respondent’s Institution

University of Edinburgh, Clinical Psychology

Topics covered

  • Experience of crime and feelings of safety
  • Police
  • Courts

Included in 2020 research audit?

No

Permission to re-contact?

Yes

Table 3j:

We belong to Glasgow: the thirdspaces of youth ‘gangs’ and asylum seeker, refugee and migrant group - I wrote a chapter on race, ethnicity and crime in Scotland a few years ago. Citation is

Fraser, A. and Piacentini, T. (2014) We belong to Glasgow: the thirdspaces of youth ‘gangs’ and asylum seeker, refugee and migrant groups. In: Phillips, C. and Webster, C. (eds.) New Directions in Race, Ethnicity and Crime. Routledge: Abingdon, Oxon, pp. 55-79. ISBN 9780415540490

It is further developed in a chapter in a book I wrote about gangs in Glasgow, which discusses about the relationship between race and place for young people's territorialism. Citation is

Fraser, A. and Piacentini, T. (2014) We belong to Glasgow: the thirdspaces of youth ‘gangs’ and asylum seeker, refugee and migrant groups. In: Phillips, C. and Webster, C. (eds.) New Directions in Race, Ethnicity and Crime. Routledge: Abingdon, Oxon, pp. 55-79. ISBN 9780415540490

Fraser, A. (2015) Urban Legends: Gang Identity in the Post-Industrial City. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Respondent’s Institution

University of Glasgow, Sociology

Topics covered

  • Experience of crime and feelings of safety
  • Other: Influence of race and space on youth crime/ violence

Included in 2020 research audit?

Yes

Permission to re-contact?

Yes

Contact

Email: Justice_Analysts@gov.scot

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