Publication - Corporate report

Scottish Budget 2019-2020

Published: 12 Dec 2018
Directorate:
Financial Management Directorate
Part of:
Economy, Scottish Budget
ISBN:
9781787813960

The Scottish Government's proposed spending and tax plans for 2019 to 2020.

Scottish Budget 2019-2020
Chapter 9 - Justice

Chapter 9 - Justice

Portfolio Responsibilities

The purpose of the Justice portfolio is to keep our communities safe and secure, and to administer justice in its various forms. 

The Justice portfolio has responsibility for the civil, criminal and administrative justice systems which include Scotland’s prisons, courts, tribunals, the legal aid system and criminal justice social work services. It supports the police and fire and rescue services. The portfolio supports safe, secure and more resilient communities and works to build Scotland’s resilience by improving Scotland’s preparedness against a range of hazards and threats, including cyber-attacks and terrorism, through multi-agency planning, strengthening national work on risk and prevention, and working with partners to build and deliver capacity. 

The Justice portfolio provides a range of vital public services in which powers are largely devolved to the Scottish Parliament. It also works closely with the UK Government and its agencies to ensure that Scotland and its communities are appropriately and proportionately protected from terrorism. It helps to create an inclusive and respectful society in which all people and communities live in safety and security, where individual and collective rights are supported, where disputes are resolved fairly and swiftly and where our responses are proportionate, effective and promote recovery. It recognises that certain protected characteristics can increase levels of risk of experiencing violence and abuse and contributes towards tackling inequalities by enabling our communities to be safe and resilient, by reducing crime and offending, supporting victims and witnesses and improving wellbeing and life chances. 

Portfolio Priorities

The Justice portfolio makes an important contribution to each of the outcomes in the new National Performance Framework and plays a lead role in delivering our national outcome of communities that are inclusive, empowered, resilient and safe. Our commitment in justice to prevention and early intervention makes a critical contribution to those national outcomes concerned with improving wellbeing and life chances and promoting a healthy active Scotland. Scotland’s justice system is underpinned by a set of fundamental principles which play a vital role in the national outcomes concerned with enforcement, protection and defence of human rights as well as underpinning economic confidence and sustainable economic growth.

‘Justice in Scotland: Vision and Priorities’, published in July 2017, was developed collaboratively with justice organisations and is a collective commitment to four outcomes and seven key priorities for the Justice portfolio.

Outcomes

  • We live in safe, cohesive and resilient communities.
  • Prevention and early intervention improve wellbeing and life chances.
  • Our system and interventions are proportionate, fair and effective.
  • We deliver person-centred, modern and affordable public services.

Priorities

  • We will enable our communities to be safe and supportive, where individuals exercise their rights and responsibilities.
  • We will enable our people, economy and infrastructure to respond to major risk, recover from emergencies and adapt to emerging threats.
  • We will modernise civil and criminal law and the justice system to meet the needs of people in Scotland in the 21st century.
  • We will work with others to improve health and wellbeing in justice settings, focusing on mental health and substance use.
  • We will work to quickly identify offenders and ensure responses are proportionate, just, effective and promote rehabilitation.
  • We will improve the experience of victims and witnesses, minimising court attendance and supporting them to give best evidence.
  • We will use prison only where necessary to address offending or to protect public safety, focusing on recovery and reintegration.

The Scottish Government continues to deliver radical reforms to Scotland’s justice system, to improve access to justice and ensure the system meets the needs of people in the 21st century, including major reforms in Scotland’s courts and securing the benefits of reform to police and fire services. This radical reform of public services has focused attention on preventative approaches and community-based solutions to tackle the root causes of crime and help communities and individuals to achieve their full potential. We will maintain access to justice for individuals through the Legal Aid system. 

Police Priorities

We will continue to support a modern and effective police service to ensure the safety and security of Scotland’s people and communities and that Scotland continues to benefit from a police service which fully supports its workforce and shapes its services around the needs of citizens and communities.

Building on the success of police reform and investment in the workforce (with a 6.5 per cent pay deal for officers running to March 2021 and progress on police staff pay and reward modernisation), we will continue to support the Scottish Police Authority (SPA) and Police Scotland to deliver the priorities in ‘Policing 2026: Serving a Changing Scotland’. This strategy will further enable an empowered police workforce to deliver a service that meets emerging and future needs. We will continue to support the SPA in their actions to improve leadership and governance of policing in Scotland.

We will support the work of the independent review of complaints handling, investigations and misconduct issues in relation to policing, and the review of the impact of policing on communities during the Miners’ Strike.

In 2019-20 we will: 

  • Continue to protect the revenue budget of the SPA in real terms. 
  • Review our strategic police priorities, ensuring they properly reflect the needs of our communities and address the changing demands our police service faces.
  • Increase our focus on collaborative working and improve multi-agency response to ensure the most vulnerable in society, including those people who present to the police in mental health distress, receive the support they need.
  • Continue to provide reform funding in 2019-20 to support a range of transformational activities including additional funding to support the modernisation of police ICT, to enhance effective mobile working. 
  • Continue to support the work of the Police Investigations Review Commissioner.
  • Continue working with partners on the GB-wide Emergency Services Mobile Communication Programme towards providing next-generation telecommunications as a key element of the critical infrastructure for all our blue-light services.

Fire and Rescue Priorities

Through the ‘Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016’, we are continuing to invest in the next phase of transformative reform of the fire and rescue service in Scotland. 

Working with the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) we support the transformational shift that focuses on prevention and collaboration, as well as a modern and effective response to emergency incidents reflecting the changing risks our communities face. 

In 2019-20 we will: 

  • Provide investment for service transformation to support and encourage SFRS to modernise the firefighter role to meet new and emerging risks. 
  • Explore opportunities for SFRS to make a wider contribution to public sector outcomes through working more closely with other emergency services.
  • Work with SFRS to deliver the Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016. 

Victims and Witnesses Priorities

We are fully committed to improving the position of victims and witnesses in the justice system and have established a dedicated Victims Taskforce to focus on doing so. The Taskforce will drive the delivery of our commitments to ensure victims’ voices are heard, to streamline their journey through the criminal justice system, and to provide wide-ranging support and accessible information through the process. It will be informed by direct evidence from victims on their experiences of the justice system, ensuring existing and planned work streams are considered and implemented with an understanding of the perspective of victims and witnesses.

In 2019-20 we will: 

  • Continue to support the work of third sector organisations who provide information and advice to victims of crime, including the development of a new service for families of homicide victims.
  • Publish a Restorative Justice Action Plan by spring 2019.
  • Continue to work towards enabling the much greater use of pre-recorded evidence of child and other vulnerable witnesses in advance of the criminal trial.
  • Commence roll out of a new statutory Appropriate Adult service to provide communication support to vulnerable adults during police procedures.
  • Continue to meet the cost of compensation payments to victims of crime in Scotland.
  • Fund a share of the running costs of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority in line with the memorandum of understanding. 

Violence Against Women and Girls Priorities

We will implement ‘Equally Safe’, Scotland’s strategy to tackle and eradicate violence against women and girls. We will continue to work with justice agencies to find ways to reduce the trauma and improve the experience of victims within the criminal justice system. This includes supporting advocacy and other services for victims and their families. We will work with justice agencies to improve the specific experience of victims of sexual offending through the justice system. We will continue to support other sectors such as health and education to develop a consistent response to violence against women across Scotland which is rooted in a gendered analysis. 

In 2019-20 we will: 

  • Implement the Domestic Abuse (Scotland) Act 2018.
  • Support training requirements for police officers on the new domestic abuse offence.
  • Develop a national awareness-raising campaign, in collaboration with victim support and advocacy services, on the new domestic abuse offence to coincide with implementation of the Act.
  • Implement justice actions in the Equally Safe Delivery Plan.
  • Work with justice agencies and through the Victims Taskforce to improve the experience of victims of sexual offences through the justice system.
  • Continue to support the work of the Chief Medical Officer Taskforce for the improvement of healthcare and forensic medical services for adults, children and young people who have experienced rape and sexual assault – recognising the importance of a collaborative approach across health and justice partners.
  • Consult on proposals to clarify in legislation the responsibility for forensic medical services to ensure that access to healthcare, as well as a forensic medical examination for victims of rape and sexual assault, is an NHS priority and consistently provided for throughout Scotland.
  • Collaborate across government with other policy areas to prevent harm to those most at risk of gender-based violence, in particular younger females.
  • Explore how the Barnahus concept could operate in Scotland and build on learning from the European Barnahus movement, drawing from the original model in Iceland and developments in other countries.
  • Oversee the implementation of the innovative Caledonian Programme in a further six local authority areas to facilitate access for more male perpetrators of domestic abuse to receive specific rehabilitation services designed to address the issues giving rise to their offending behaviour.

Safer Communities Priorities

We remain focused on building communities that feel safe and are safe. We will continue to work with local authorities, Police Scotland, the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service and Education Scotland as well as with a range of other partners – such as Neighbourhood Watch, Crimestoppers, the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents and the Missing People charity – to prevent unintentional harm; to improve support for those at risk of going missing; as well as to reduce violence, anti-social behaviour and sectarianism. 

 In 2019-20 we will: 

  • Continue our work through the Scottish Community Safety Network to increase connections to local activity focused on keeping our communities safe. 
  • Reduce violence by continuing to support the work of the Scottish Violence Reduction Unit; and Medics Against Violence, including the hospital-based Navigators initiative.
  • Reduce the risk of unintentional harm by supporting initiatives in communities across Scotland.
  • Continue to address sectarianism by supporting educational and other initiatives – as well as responding to our consultation on hate crime legislation.
  • Improve the support provided across Scotland to missing people and their families.

Resilience Priorities

Developing and maintaining resilience in Scotland requires a flexible and adaptive approach. We will continue to develop community resilience, building on themes of empowerment and preparedness through identifying trends and new risks, prevention, planning, response and recovery to ensure that the people of Scotland are able to cope both with potential disasters such as fire, flood or climate change, and with the everyday challenges and risks faced by families in need.

We will collaborate with partners to ensure we can appropriately and proportionately tackle the threat posed by terrorism and organised crime.

To deal with the increasing cyber threat, we are implementing action plans to help strengthen the resilience of Scotland’s public, private and third sectors against cyber-attacks. We are working to strengthen our learning and skills system so that it supports our citizens to operate safely and confidently in the digital world, providing them with opportunities to develop cyber specialist skills and career paths that help retain talent in Scotland. In addition we are improving our ability to capitalise on the economic opportunities that an increasing focus on cyber security in the global economy will bring for Scotland.

In 2019-20 we will: 

  • Lead on the development of vision, guidance, policy and training on resilience in Scotland, recognising the challenges and risks that impact on Scotland.
  • Provide funding to support the development and implementation of action plans to help strengthen Scotland’s approach to cyber resilience.
  • Engage with essential services operators to encourage them to further protect and enhance the critical infrastructure resilience of their assets, systems, networks and people.

Community Justice: Reducing Re-offending Priorities

We will work with Community Justice Scotland and national and local community justice partners, including the third sector, to implement the national Community Justice Strategy to deliver better outcomes for individuals and communities. Evidence from local Community Justice Outcome Improvement Plans and Care Inspectorate support for validated self-evaluation by partnerships and inspection of criminal justice social work will inform the next phase of implementation. We will continue to focus our efforts around early and targeted intervention in collaboration with youth justice colleagues within the Education and Skills portfolio to prevent reoffending and improve life chances of young people and others by improving links between employment, housing, education and health services. 

We will support efforts to increase the use of and confidence in community sentences, including expanding electronic monitoring capability in satellite tracking and remote substance monitoring. The Management of Offenders Bill is being scrutinised by Parliament and an affirmative order to extend the presumption against short-term periods of imprisonment to include sentences of 12 months or less will be laid in spring 2019. 

In 2019-20 we will: 

  • Support robust and effective community disposals, such as community payback orders, alongside the extension of the presumption against short sentences.
  • Expand electronic monitoring capability following parliamentary scrutiny.
  • Expand support for bail supervision, which is a robust alternative to remand.
  • Support services to meet the specific needs of women offenders.
  • Implement the recommendations of the independent reviews of Home Detention Curfews by HM Inspectorate of Prison and HM Inspectorate of the Constabulary for Scotland working with Police Scotland and the Scottish Prison Service.
  • Consult on ways to make the parole process more open and transparent.

We will work with the Scottish Prison Service, justice and health partners, as well as other public services and the third sector, to continue to support the rehabilitation and reintegration of people leaving custody back into our communities, taking forward and implementing our National Strategy for Community Justice in order to prevent further offending.

Scottish Prison Service Priorities

In 2019-20 we will: 

  • Continue to take forward work on the future of Scotland’s modernised prison estate to meet the changing demands of the prison population and to transform the lives of people in our care.
  • Progress transformation of the female custodial estate to address the specific needs of female offenders including the construction of a smaller national facility at HMP Cornton Vale and the development of two innovative community-based custody units in Glasgow and Dundee in 2020-21.
  • Work with partners to support the Scottish Government’s commitment to provide more effective health and social care services in our prisons, in order to address the widespread health inequalities of people in the justice system.
  • Consider the recommendations arising from the current independent review into support services for young people entering and in custody at Her Majesty’s Young Offender Institution Polmont. 
  • Work with partners to enhance support for children affected by parental imprisonment. 
  • Work with partner organisations to further develop through-care services for those leaving prison.

Justice Reform Priorities

We will continue to improve the administration of justice.

In 2019-20 we will: 

  • Ensure that those most in need are able to access publicly-funded legal assistance and also progress a range of projects to improve access to justice.
  • Continue to work to ensure that disputes are resolved at the most appropriate level in the justice system and progress work to reform criminal and civil procedure to keep pace with societal changes and international standards. 
  • Continue to work with justice partners to develop opportunities for transforming services through technology to transform criminal justice processes.

Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service Priorities

In 2019-20 we will: 

  • Place digital innovation at the centre of service delivery to improve access to justice, support quicker outcomes and minimise physical appearance in courts.
  • Develop and implement solutions that will better protect the interests of children and vulnerable witnesses, including the much greater use of pre-recorded evidence.
  • Continue to transform civil justice by implementing new court rules and introducing technology-driven case management systems in civil courts and in the Office of the Public Guardian.
  • Continue to support the important work of Scotland’s Tribunals.

Human Trafficking Priorities

We will continue to work with partners to implement Scotland’s human trafficking and exploitation strategy through actions to identify victims and support them to recovery, identify perpetrators and disrupt their activity, and address the conditions that foster trafficking and exploitation. 

Spending Plans

Table 9.01: Spending Plans (Level 2) 

Level 2 2017-18
Budget
£m
2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
Community Justice 33.6 35.4 37.1
Judiciary 31.6 34.0 34.3
Criminal Injuries Compensation 17.5 17.5 15.5
Legal Aid 137.2 137.4 137.4
Safer and Stronger Communities 4.1 5.7 6.4
Police Central Government 117.9 90.3 66.8
Police and Fire Pensions 350.6 350.6 350.6
Prison Services 361.0 361.4 393.7
Miscellaneous 37.4 43.5 53.5
Scottish Police Authority 1,092.4 1,137.8 1,180.1
Scottish Fire and Rescue Service 316.4 321.6 327.2
Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service 105.6 117.7 116.6
Total Justice 2,605.3 2,652.9 2,719.2
of which:    
Total Fiscal Resource 2,372.5 2,410.0 2,442.1
  of which Operating Costs* 27.5
Non-cash 128.8 130.1 133.1
Capital 104.0 112.8 144.0
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME 

* In 2019-20, there is a change to the way that Scottish Government staffing budgets are presented and total operating costs are now included within portfolio budgets. This is set out in more detail in the Annex on operating costs.

Presentational Adjustments for Scottish Parliament Approval

Level 2 2017-18
Budget
£m
2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
Legal Aid (NDPB Non-cash) (0.4) (0.6) (0.6)
SPA (NDPB Non-cash) (50.0) (50.0) (50.0)
SFRS (NDPB Non-cash) (24.7) (24.7) (24.7)
Police Loan Charges 5.4 5.4 3.6
Judicial Salaries (30.6) (33.0) (33.3)
PPP/PFI Adjustments (3.1) 1.7 1.7 
SCTS - shown separately (105.6) (117.7) (116.6)
Central Government Grants to Local Authorities 86.5 86.5 86.5
Total Justice 2,482.8 2,520.5 2,585.8
Total Limit on Income (accruing resources) 39.7

What the Community Justice Services budget does 

This budget includes funding to support offenders who are serving community-based sentences, electronic monitoring of offenders (e.g. through Restriction of Liberty Orders) and offender mentoring services. It supports the work of Community Justice Scotland, Scotland’s national body for promoting the highest standards of community justice services across Scotland.

Table 9.02: Community Justice Services Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2017-18
Budget
£m
2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
Offender Services 30.4 32.2 33.9
Miscellaneous 3.2 3.2 3.2
Total Community Justice 33.6 35.4 37.1
of which:      
Fiscal Resource  33.6 35.4 37.0
Non-cash 0.1
Capital
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME

See footnote on operating costs in Table 9.01.

What the Judiciary budget does 

The Judiciary budget provides for the running costs of the Judicial Appointments Board for Scotland and the Court of the Lord Lyon, salary costs for the Lord Lyon, the Lyon Clerk, the Auditor of the Court of Session, as well as Commissioners and former Commissioners of the Scottish Land Court. 

Table 9.03: Judiciary Spending Plans* (Level 3)

Level 3 2017-18
Budget
£m
2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
Judiciary  1.0 1.0 1.0
Judicial Salaries 30.6 33.0 33.3
Judiciary  31.6 34.0 34.3
of which:      
Fiscal Resource  31.6 34.0 34.3
Non-cash
Capital
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME

*This is non-voted spend which is met from the Scottish Consolidated Fund but is also part of the Departmental spending limit.

What the Criminal Injuries Compensation budget does 

The UK-wide Criminal Injuries Compensation (CIC) Scheme provides compensation to the blameless victims of crime and is administered by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (an executive agency of the Ministry of Justice). 

Table 9.04: Criminal Injuries Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2017-18 Budget
 £m
2018-19 Budget
 £m
2019-20 Budget
£m
CIC Scheme 14.8 14.8 12.8
Criminal Injuries Administration Costs 2.7 2.7 2.7
Total Criminal Injuries Compensation 17.5 17.5 15.5
of which:      
Fiscal Resource  17.5 17.5 15.5
Non-cash
Capital
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME

What the Legal Aid budget does 

The Fund element of this budget pays for demand-led legal aid provision in Scotland, which is administered by the Scottish Legal Aid Board (‘the Board’), an executive non-departmental public body. It also enables the Board to: 

Develop a network of Board-employed solicitors who provide criminal legal advice and representation (Public Defence Solicitors Office) and to develop and monitor advice services on civil matters using Board-employed solicitors (Civil Legal Assistance Offices).

Administer grant-funded advice services, including the In Court Advice projects. 

The Administration element of this budget enables the Board to meet its staffing and accommodation costs, as well as cover costs relating to various matters including researching and analysing the operation of legal aid, the trends and the impact on the wider justice system. It also includes a budget allocation to meet the Board’s capital expenditure. 

Table 9.05: Legal Aid Spending Plans (Level 3) 

Level 3 2017-18 Budget
 £m
2018-19 Budget
 £m
2019-20 Budget
£m
Legal Aid Administration 11.1 11.3 11.6
Legal Aid Fund 126.1 126.1 125.8
Total Legal Aid 137.2 137.4 137.4
of which:      
Fiscal Resource  136.8 136.8 136.8
Non-cash 0.3 0.5 0.5
Capital 0.1 0.1 0.1
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME

What the Safer and Stronger Communities budget does 

This budget supports a range of initiatives to build safer communities, reduce violence, tackle sectarianism, prevent crime and reduce unintentional harm. 

Table 9.06: Safer and Stronger Communities Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2017-18 Budget
 £m
2018-19 Budget
 £m
2019-20 Budget
£m
Safer Communities 4.1 5.7 6.4
Total Safer and Stronger Communities 4.1 5.7 6.4
of which:      
Fiscal Resource  4.1 5.7 6.4
Non-cash
Capital
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME

See footnote on operating costs in Table 9.01.

What the Police Central Government budget does 

The Police Central Government budget supports the delivery of police transformational change and reform programmes, including ‘Policing 2026: Serving a Changing Scotland’. It also includes funding for the Police Investigations and Review Commissioner, Airwave and the GB-wide Emergency Services Mobile Communications Programme.

Table 9.07: Police Central Government Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2017-18
Budget
£m
2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
National Police Funding and Reform 117.8 90.2 66.4
Police Support Services 0.1 0.1 0.4
Total Police Central Government 117.9 90.3 66.8
of which:      
Fiscal Resource  95.7 76.0 59.7
Non-cash 2.2 2.2 2.5
Capital 20.0 12.1 4.6
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME

See footnote on operating costs in Table 9.01.

What the Police and Fire Pensions budget does 

This budget funds the pension costs of retired police and fire officers in 2019-20.

Table 9.08: Police and Fire Pensions Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2017-18
Budget
£m
2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
Police Pensions 278.4 278.4 278.4
Fire Pensions 72.2 72.2 72.2
Total Police and Fire Pensions 350.6 350.6 350.6
of which:      
Fiscal Resource  350.6 350.6 350.6
Non-cash
Capital
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME

What the Scottish Prison Service budget does 

The Scottish Prison Service (SPS) budget covers expenditure associated with operating the prison system (both publicly-and privately-managed prisons) and the provision of a Court Custody and Prisoner Escorting Service (CCPES) on behalf of Scottish Courts, Police Scotland and the wider justice system. The SPS provides a wide range of services to care for and support those who are in custody and their families, as well as operating a Victim Notification Scheme for registered victims of crime. 

Table 9.09: Scottish Prison Service Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2017-18 Budget
 £m
2018-19 Budget
 £m
2019-20 Budget
£m
Scottish Prison Service 361.0 361.4 393.7
Total Scottish Prison Service 361.0 361.4 393.7
of which:      
Fiscal Resource  311.2 312.2 312.2
Non-cash 34.0 33.0 34.0
Capital 15.8 16.2 47.5
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME

What the Miscellaneous budget does 

This budget covers a wide range of smaller justice-related spending areas including the Scottish Law Commission, the Parole Board for Scotland and the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission. It also includes provision for Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons in Scotland, Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Fire and Rescue in Scotland, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary in Scotland, Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Prosecutions in Scotland, core funding for third sector organisations whose work supports the victims of crime and support for the justice contribution to tackling violence against women and girls. 

In addition the budget supports work to build Scotland’s resilience through improved multi-agency planning and response to emergencies and support to help communities become more resilient. This budget also provides funding to support the armed forces and veterans community in Scotland. 

Table 9.10: Miscellaneous Spending Plans (Level 3) 

Level 3 2017-18
Budget
£m
2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
Safe and Secure Scotland 8.8 8.3 12.0
Victim/Witness Support 15.8 17.9 18.0
Other Miscellaneous 12.8 17.3 23.5
Total Miscellaneous 37.4 43.5 53.5
of which:      
Fiscal Resource 36.2 37.4 47.5
Non-cash 0.1 0.1
Capital 1.1 6.0 6.0
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME

See footnote on operating costs in Table 9.01.

What the Scottish Police Authority budget does 

This budget is provided to the Scottish Police Authority (SPA) to enable the delivery of an effective and efficient policing service to the people of Scotland that reflects the needs of local communities. 

The capital budget for 2019-20 will support the police in delivering key components of their capital plan. 

Table 9.11: Scottish Police Authority Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2017-18 Budget
 £m
2018-19 Budget
 £m
2019-20 Budget
£m
Scottish Police Authority 1,092.4 1,137.8 1,180.1
Total Scottish Police Authority 1,092.4 1,137.8 1,180.1
of which:      
Fiscal Resource 1,022.4 1,064.8 1,095.1
Non-cash 50.0 50.0 50.0
Capital 20.0 23.0 35.0
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME

What the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service budget does 

This budget funds the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) to work in partnership with other agencies, the public and private sectors and communities on fire safety, prevention, protection and emergency response to improve the safety and wellbeing of the people of Scotland. The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service priorities are contained within the SFRS Strategic and Annual Plans, which align with the Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016. 

Table 9.12: Scottish Fire and Rescue Service Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2017-18
Budget
£m
2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
Scottish Fire and Rescue Service 316.4 321.6 327.2
Total Scottish Fire and Rescue Service 316.4 321.6 327.2
of which:      
Fiscal Resource 259.2 264.4 270.0
Non-cash 24.7 24.7 24.7
Capital 32.5 32.5 32.5
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME

What the Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service budget does 

The Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service (SCTS) provides the people, buildings and technology to support the judiciary, the courts, the tribunals and the Office of the Public Guardian. The SCTS is a non-Ministerial department, chaired by the Lord President. 

Table 9.13: Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service Spending Plans (Level 3) 

Level 3 2017-18
Budget
£m
2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service 105.6 117.7 116.6
Total Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service 105.6 117.7 116.6
of which:      
Fiscal Resource 73.6 75.2 77.0
Non-cash 17.5 19.6 21.3
Capital 14.5 22.9 18.3
Financial Transactions
UK Funded AME

What the Central Government Grants to Local Authorities budget does 

This ring-fenced funding supports local authorities in providing Criminal Justice Social Work (CJSW) services across Scotland. These services include supervising those offenders aged 16 and over who have been subject to a community disposal from the courts; providing reports to courts to assist with sentencing decisions; and providing statutory supervision (throughcare) for certain offenders on release from prison. There are also special services for certain key groups of offenders. 

Table 9.14: Central Government Grants to Local Authorities Spending Plans (Level 3)

Level 3 2017-18
Budget
£m
2018-19
Budget
£m
2019-20
Budget
£m
Criminal Justice Social Work 86.5 86.5 86.5
Total Justice Central Government Grants to Local Authorities 86.5 86.5 86.5

Contact

Email: Finance.co-ordination@gov.scot