Publication - Consultation paper

Scotland 2045 - fourth National Planning Framework - draft: consultation

Published: 10 Nov 2021

Draft of Scotland 2045: Our Fourth National Planning Framework: consultation

Scotland 2045 - fourth National Planning Framework - draft: consultation
Part 2 – National Developments

Part 2 – National Developments

National developments are significant developments of national importance that will help to deliver our spatial strategy.

Eighteen national developments are proposed to support the delivery of our spatial strategy. These national developments range from single large scale projects or collections and networks of several smaller scale proposals. They are also intended to act as exemplars of the place principle and placemaking approaches.

In taking forward national developments we expect delivery partners to:

  • design and progress their developments in a way which supports community wealth building;
  • manage known and predicted climate risks arising from the development and its location;
  • improve biodiversity and restore habitats as far as possible;
  • consider how the development interacts with the provision of heat for the surrounding area, potentially in connection with a Local Heat and Energy Efficiency Strategy and emerging plans for the heat sector in the longer term;
  • ensure alignment with Scotland's National Marine Plan, as well as any relevant sectoral and regional marine plans; and
  • ensure that associated transport interventions to facilitate access to or from the locations are in line with sustainable transport and sustainable investment hierarchies. Strategic transport interventions for Government will be identified in the second Strategic Transport Projects Review and Islands Connectivity Plan, and some recommendations may require working with partners for their delivery.

Where more than one national development applies to a development proposal, this simply serves to confirm that national development handling procedures should be applied.

This designation means that the principle of the development does not need to be agreed in later consenting processes, providing more certainty for communities, business and investors. Appropriate consents and associated impact assessments will still be undertaken in line with statutory obligations. Further information about national developments can be found at Transforming Planning.

An assessment of the likely impact of each proposed national development's lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reductions targets[2] (with the meaning given in the Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009) has been included. This is a strategic level assessment and it follows that there is considerable uncertainty as to the detailed scale and location of development that may occur and around the implementation of new technologies. The assessment is based on the detail provided at the time of the assessment, and the conclusion may alter depending on the nature and detail of the projects taken forward.

National Developments
A map of the 18 National Developments, divided into Liveable places, Productive places and Distinctive places

National developments to deliver sustainable, liveable places

1. Central Scotland Green Network

This national development is one of Europe's largest and most ambitious green infrastructure projects. It will play a key role in tackling the challenges of climate change and biodiversity loss including by building and strengthening nature networks. A greener approach to development will improve placemaking, can contribute to the roll-out of 20 minute neighbourhoods and will benefit biodiversity connectivity. This has particular relevance in the more urban parts of Scotland where there is pressure for development as well as significant areas requiring regeneration to address past decline and disadvantage. Regeneration, repurposing and reuse of vacant and derelict land should be a priority.

Priorities include enhancement to provide multifunctional green infrastructure that provides greatest environmental, lifelong physical and mental health, social wellbeing and economic benefits. It focuses on those areas where greening and development can be mutually supportive, helping to improve equity of access to quality green space, and supporting communities where improving wellbeing and resilience is most needed, including to help people adapt to future climate risks.

Nature-based solutions for climate change adaptation and mitigation may include woodland expansion and peatland restoration as a priority. The connectivity of biodiversity rich areas may be enhanced through nature networks, including corridors and stepping stones to provide enhanced natural capital and improved ecosystem services.

Location

Central Scotland local authorities within a boundary identified by the Green Action Trust.

Need

This national development is needed to improve quality of place and create new opportunities for investment. This will support delivery of our spatial strategy which highlights the importance of accelerating urban greening in this most densely populated part of Scotland.

Designation and classes of development

A development within the Central Scotland Green Network area and within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that is of a scale or type that would otherwise have been classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009', is designated a national development:

a) Land for new and/or extensions to areas for multi-functional green infrastructure including for: emissions sequestration; adaptation to climate change; biodiversity enhancement;

b) Reuse of vacant and derelict land and buildings for greening and nature-based solutions;

c) New and/or upgraded sustainable surface water management and drainage systems and the creation of blue space;

d) Use of land for allotments or community food growing; and

e) Routes for active travel and or recreation.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

2. National Walking, Cycling and Wheeling Network

This national development facilitates the shift from vehicles to walking, cycling and wheeling for everyday journeys contributing to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from transport and is highly beneficial for health and wellbeing.

The upgrading and provision of additional active travel infrastructure will be fundamental to the development of a sustainable travel network providing access to settlements, key services and amenities, employment and multi‑modal hubs. Infrastructure investment should be prioritised for locations where it will achieve our National Transport Strategy 2 priorities and outcomes, to reduce inequalities, take climate action, help deliver a wellbeing economy and to improve health and wellbeing. This will help to deliver great places to live and work.

Location

All Scotland.

Need

Reducing the need to travel unsustainably is the highest priority in the sustainable transport investment hierarchy. This national development will significantly support modal shift and deliver multiple outcomes including our commitment to a 20% reduction in car kilometres, associated emissions reduction, health and air quality improvement. This will support the delivery of our spatial strategy by creating a more sustainable distribution of access across Scotland as a whole.

Designation and classes of development

A development within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that is of a scale or type that would otherwise have been classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009' is designated a national development:

a) New/and or upgraded routes suitable for a range of users for walking, cycling and wheeling that help create a national network that facilitates short and longer distance journeys and linkages to multi-modal hubs.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

3. Urban Mass/Rapid Transit Networks

A map highlighting Aberdeen, Glasgow and Edinburgh.

This national development supports low-carbon mass/rapid transit projects for Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow.

To reduce transport emissions at scale, we will require low‑carbon transport solutions for these three major cities that can support transformational reduction in private car use.

Phase 1 of the second Strategic Transport Projects Review (STPR2) recommended the development of the Glasgow 'Metro' and Edinburgh Mass Transit in these cities and their associated regions. In Aberdeen, the North East Bus Alliance has been awarded funding through Transport Scotland's Bus Partnership to develop the Aberdeen Rapid Transit system identified in the Regional Transport Strategy and being considered in the STPR2.

This will support placemaking and deliver improved transport equity across the most densely populated parts of Scotland, improving access to employment and supporting sustainable investment in the longer term.

The type of interventions will be determined through the ongoing development of business cases and studies but could include the provision of new systems or extensions to existing sustainable and public transport networks.

Location

Aberdeen, Glasgow and Edinburgh city regions.

Need

This national development will help reduce transport related emissions overall, improve air quality, reduce the demand for private vehicle use, support the roll out of 20 minute neighbourhoods and improve transport equity.

Designation and classes of development

A development within one or more of the Classes of Development below and that is of a scale or type that would otherwise have been classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009' is designated a national development. This relates to development supported by the Strategic Transport Projects Review 2 consisting of new or upgraded:

a) Track or road infrastructure;

b) Fuelling or power infrastructure;

c) Passenger facilities; and

d) Depots servicing the networks.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

4. Urban Sustainable, Blue and Green Drainage Solutions

A map highlighting Glasgow and Edinburgh.

This national development aims to build on the benefits of the Metropolitan Glasgow Strategic Drainage Partnership, to continue investment and extend the approach to the Edinburgh city region.

Our biggest cities and their regions will require improved infrastructure to ensure they are more resilient to climate change. A strategic, catchment scale approach to adaptation through surface water and drainage infrastructure investment will reduce impacts and risks for our urban population and is an example of an infrastructure-first approach. Nature-based solutions which may include blue and green infrastructure should be prioritised, with use of built engineered structures minimised and optimised as far as possible. Delivery of multiple climate, wellbeing and economic benefits should form the basis of the approach. Whilst this national development focuses on Edinburgh and Glasgow other cities and towns may benefit from similar approaches.

Location

City and wider catchment areas of Glasgow and Edinburgh.

Need

A large proportion of our population lives in our largest cities. The management of surface water drainage at scale across these city regions will help us to adapt to extreme weather events that will become more frequent as a result of climate change. Whilst focused on drainage, a nature-based approach to surface water management has the potential to deliver multiple health, wellbeing, economic and climate adaptation and emissions reduction benefits. It will also free up sewer capacity for connections to new development.

Designation and classes of development

A development in the Glasgow and Edinburgh city regions within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that is of a scale or type that would otherwise have been classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009' is designated a national development:

a) Spaces, infrastructure, works, structures, buildings, pipelines and nature-based approaches for surface water management and drainage systems.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

5. Circular Economy Materials Management Facilities

This national development supports the development of facilities required to achieve a circular economy. This sector will provide a range of business, skills and employment opportunities as part of a just transition to a net zero economy.

The range and scale of facilities required to manage secondary materials and their reprocessing back out into the economy is not yet clear. However, it is clear that sites and facilities will be needed to retain the resource value of materials so that we can maximise the use of materials in the economy and minimise the use of virgin materials in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This is particularly significant for the construction and demolition industries and decommissioning industry.

Careful assessment of specific proposals will be required to ensure they provide sustainable low carbon solutions, include appropriate controls, manage any emissions and mitigate localised impacts including on neighbouring communities and the wider environment.

Location

All Scotland.

Need

This national development helps maximise Scotland's potential to retain the energy and emissions values within materials already in the economy.

Designation and classes of development

A development within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that is of a scale or type that would otherwise have been classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009' is designated a national development:

a) Facilities for managing secondary materials;

b) Repurposing facilities;

c) Reprocessing facilities; and

d) Recycling facilities.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

6. Digital Fibre Network

This national development supports the continued roll-out of world class broadband across Scotland.

Our strategy requires enhanced digital connectivity to provide high speed broadband or equivalent mobile services, prioritising those areas with weaker networks as part of the R100 programme and Project Gigabit, including urban, island specific and rural enhancements. This is a significant utility including 4G and 5G mobile infrastructure facilitating home based working, renewable energy development, rural repopulation and access to services. The data transmission network can also support the availability and use of 'big data'. Digital capability is a feature of a number of City Region and Growth Deals.

Opportunities should be taken to deliver the infrastructure as part of other infrastructure upgrades or installation works such as energy transmission, transportation, and travel networks where appropriate.

Location

All Scotland.

Need

This is a fundamentally important utility, required to support development, community wellbeing, equal access to goods and services, and emissions reduction from reduced demand for travel. This will help to deliver our spatial strategy by complementing a new emphasis of living locally, and by helping to sustain and grow rural and island communities.

Designation and classes of development

A development within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that is of a scale or type that would otherwise have been classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009', is designated a national development:

a) Installation of new and/or upgraded broadband cabling on land and sub-sea for fixed line and mobile networks; and

b) Green data centres.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall negligible impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

National developments to deliver sustainable, productive places

7. Islands Hub for Net Zero

A map highlighting the Western Isles, Shetland and Orkney Island groups.

Description

This national development supports proposed developments in the Western Isles, Shetland and Orkney island groups, for renewable energy generation, renewable hydrogen production, infrastructure and shipping, and associated opportunities in the supply chain for fabrication, research and development, in particular at the proposed Orkney Research and Innovation Campus. Any strategy for deployment of these technologies must enable decarbonisation at pace and cannot be used to justify unsustainable levels of fossil fuel extraction or impede Scotland's just transition to net zero.

This is aligned with low carbon energy projects within the Islands Growth Deal and encompasses other projects that can facilitate net zero aims.

The use of low and zero emission fuels will play a crucial role in decarbonising island and mainland energy use, shipping, strengthening energy security overall and creating a low carbon energy economy for the islands and the islanders. The developments will add value where they link into national and international energy, learning and research and development networks. There may also be opportunity for ports in the islands to establish themselves as near-Arctic marine transport and logistics hubs, including for transhipment operations.

Location

Western Isles, Shetland, Orkney and surrounding waters.

Need

These classes of development support the potential of the three island authorities to exemplify a transition to a net zero society. This will support delivery of our spatial strategy by helping to sustain communities in rural and island areas by stimulating employment and innovation.

Designation and classes of development

A development in the location within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that is of a scale or type that would otherwise have been classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009', is designated a national development:

a) Buildings, land and structures for development providing employment related to delivering the Islands Hub for net-zero;

b) New or updated on and/or offshore infrastructure for energy generation from renewables of or exceeding 50 megawatts capacity;

c) Electricity transmission cables and converter stations on and offshore of or exceeding 132kv;

d) Infrastructure for the production, storage and transportation of low and zero-carbon fuels (that are not electricity or heat) including renewable hydrogen; and hydrogen production related chemicals including ammonia with appropriate carbon capture linked to transport and storage infrastructure;

e) Improved oil storage infrastructure for Stornoway, with appropriate emissions abatement;

f) Quay to service marine energy, energy transportation, energy decommissioning, fabrication or freight handling, including new or enhanced associated laydown or operational area at Arnish, Scapa Flow, and Kirkwall;

g) Quay and handling facilities for ultra large container ships in Scapa Flow; and

h) Oil terminal modifications at Scapa Flow and Shetland to maintain asset use moving towards net zero emissions.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

8. Industrial Green Transition Zones

To secure a just transition to a net zero economy, the decarbonisation of nationally important industrial sites in a way that ensures continued jobs, investment and prosperity for these areas and the communities that depend on them is essential. Industrial Green Transition Zones (IGTZ) will support the generation of significant economic opportunities while minimising carbon emissions. Technologies that will help Scotland transition to net zero will be supported at these locations, with a particular focus on low carbon and zero emissions technologies including renewables and the generation, storage and distribution of low carbon hydrogen.

The deployment of hydrogen and Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage at these locations must demonstrate decarbonisation at pace and cannot be used to justify unsustainable levels of fossil fuel extraction or impede Scotland's just transition to Net Zero. Hydrogen and CCUS are emerging industries, both government and industry in Scotland wish to accelerate and maximise the deployment of green hydrogen. For projects that utilise carbon capture and storage, we want to ensure the highest possible capture rates in the deployment of these technologies. While there are examples internationally where CCS projects have been associated with offshore Enhanced Oil Recovery, we understand there to be no plans for offshore Enhanced Oil Recovery as part of the Scottish Cluster. However, if any IGTZ is found to be incompatible with Scotland's transition to net zero, Scottish Government policy will change accordingly. Further detail will be set out in the forthcoming Energy Strategy.

The role of upstream emissions as part of the consideration of the acceptability of development proposals and the role of thermal generation will therefore be considered and this will inform the finalised version of the National Planning Framework 4.

Industrial Green Transition Zones are:

  • The Scottish Cluster encompasses a Carbon Capture, Utilisation and Storage (CCUS) projects network and is a key strategic vehicle for industrial decarbonisation, energy generation, and the transportation and storage of captured carbon. The designation relates to projects that form a Scottish Cluster in the first instance specifically Peterhead, St Fergus and Grangemouth, as well as further industrial transition sites that are expected to emerge in the longer term. This national development will support the generation of significant economic opportunities for low-carbon industry as well as minimising carbon emissions at scale, and will play a vital part in maintaining the security and operability of Scotland's electricity supply and network. The creation of hydrogen and deployment of negative emissions technologies, utilising CCS, at commercial scale will establish the opportunities to decarbonise industry, transport and heat, as well as other sectors, and pave the way for the transportation and storage infrastructure to support the growing hydrogen economy in Scotland.
  • Grangemouth Investment Zone currently hosts strategic and critical infrastructure, high value employment and manufacturing of materials that are currently vital for everyday life. This role will continue in the long term but must seek to decarbonise given the significant contribution of the industrial activities to Scotland's emissions. It is a key location in the Scottish Cluster for carbon capture and storage, and hydrogen deployment. The Grangemouth Investment Zone will be a focus for transitioning the petrochemicals industry and associated activities into a leading exemplar of industrial decarbonisation, significantly helped through the coordination activities of the Scottish Government's Grangemouth Future Industry Board. Decarbonisation could include opportunities for: renewable energy innovation; bioenergy; hydrogen production with carbon capture and storage; and repurposing of existing strategic and critical infrastructure such as pipelines.

Location

St Fergus, Peterhead, and Grangemouth.

Need

This national development is required to meet our targets for emissions reduction. It also supports a just transition by creating new jobs in emerging technologies and significant economic opportunities for lower carbon industry. It will help to decarbonise other sectors, sites and regions, paving the way for increasing demand to be complemented by the production of further hydrogen in the future. This will also help to deliver our spatial strategy by supporting investment in the North East and the Central Belt where there has been a relatively high level of output from fossil fuel industries.

Designation and classes of development

A development in the location within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that would otherwise have been of a scale or type that is classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009' is designated a national development.

Hydrogen and CCUS are emerging industries, both government and industry in Scotland wish to attain the highest technologically possible capture rates in the deployment of these technologies. While there are examples internationally where CCS projects have been associated with offshore Enhanced Oil Recovery, we understand there to be no plans for offshore Enhanced Oil Recovery as part of the Scottish Cluster.

a) Carbon capture with high capture rates and negative emission technologies, transportation and storage of captured carbon forming part of or helping to create an expandable national network;

b) Pipeline for transportation and storage of captured carbon;

c) Onshore infrastructure including compression equipment, supporting pipeline transportation and shipping transportation of captured carbon and/or hydrogen;

d) Offshore storage of captured carbon;

e) New and/or upgraded buildings and facilities for the utilisation of captured carbon;

f) Infrastructure for the production of hydrogen;

g) On or near-shore geological storage of hydrogen;

h) Port facilities for the transport and handling of hydrogen and carbon dioxide;

i) The application of Carbon Capture and Storage technology to existing or replacement thermal power generation;

j) Production, storage and transportation with appropriate emissions abatement of: bioenergy; hydrogen production related chemicals including ammonia;

k) New and/or upgraded buildings for industrial, manufacturing, business, and educational or research uses related to the industrial transition;

l) Town centre regeneration at Grangemouth;

m) Grangemouth flood protection scheme;

n) New and/or upgraded green and blue infrastructure;

o) New and/or upgraded utilities and/or local energy network; and

p) New and or upgraded facilities at the port for inter-modal freight handling and passenger facilities at Grangemouth.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

9. Pumped Hydro Storage

A map highlighting Cruachan, a nationally important example of a pumped storage facility.

This national development will play a significant role in balancing and optimising electricity generation and maintaining the operability of the electricity system as part of our transition to net zero. This is necessary as we continue to move towards a decarbonised system with much more renewable generation, the output from which is defined by weather conditions.

This national development supports additional capacity at existing sites as well as new sites. Cruachan in Argyll is a nationally important example of a pumped storage facility with significant potential for enhanced capacity that could create significant jobs in a rural location.

Location

All Scotland, with an initial focus on Cruachan.

Need

This national development supports pumped hydro storage capacity within the electricity network through significant new or expanded sites. This supports the transition to a net zero economy through the ability of pumped hydro storage schemes to optimise electricity generated from renewables by storing and releasing it when it is required.

Designation and classes of development

A development within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that is of a scale or type that would otherwise have been classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009', is designated a national development:

a) New and/or expanded and/or upgraded water holding reservoir and dam;

b) New and/or upgraded electricity generating plant structures or buildings;

c) New and/or upgraded pump plant structures or buildings;

d) New and/or expanded and/or upgraded water inlet and outlet pipework;

e) New and/or upgraded substations and/or transformers directly required for the pumped hydro scheme; and

f) New and/or replacement transmission cables directly linked to the pumped hydro scheme.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

10. Hunterston Strategic Asset

A map highlighting Hunterston port and adjacent former nuclear power station site.

This national development supports the repurposing of Hunterston port as well as the adjacent former nuclear power station site. Hunterston has long been recognised as a strategic location for the port and energy sectors given its deepwater access and existing infrastructure.

The location and infrastructure offers potential for electricity generation from renewables, and a variety of commercial uses including port, research and development, aquaculture, the circular economy.

New development will need to work with the capacity of the transport network, include active travel links and be compatible with a location adjacent to sites with nuclear power uses. Designated biodiversity sites will require protection and enhancement where possible, and sustainable flood risk management solutions will be required. Aligned with the Ayrshire Growth Deal, investment in this location will support a wellbeing economy by opening up opportunities for employment and training for local people. A community wealth building approach is expected to form a part of future development proposals to ensure the benefits are retained locally as far as possible.

Location

Hunterston Port and Hunterston A power station site.

Need

These classes of development support the redevelopment and reuse of existing strategic assets and land contributing to a net zero economy. It also supports delivery of our spatial strategy by stimulating investment in the west of Scotland, potentially contributing to the wider aim of tackling inequalities.

Designation and classes of development

A development in the location within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that would otherwise have been of a scale or type that is classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009', is designated a national development:

a) Infrastructure to support a multi-modal deep water harbour;

b) Land and buildings for bulk handling, storage, processing and distribution.

c) Facilities for marine energy generation technology fabrication and decommissioning;

d) Facilities for marine energy servicing;

e) Land and buildings for industrial, commercial, research and development, and training uses;

f) Infrastructure for the capture, transportation and long term storage of greenhouse gas emissions, where transportation may be by pipe or vehicular means;

g) Infrastructure for the production, storage and transportation of low carbon and renewable hydrogen; and hydrogen production related chemicals including ammonia; and

h) Infrastructure for the generation and storage of electricity from renewables of or exceeding 50 megawatts.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

11. Chapelcross Power Station Redevelopment

A map highlighting Chapelcross, a former nuclear power station site.

This national development supports the redevelopment of Chapelcross, a former nuclear power station site of significant scale regionally and nationally, and our strategy supports the reuse of the site to help deliver on net zero and provide opportunities for communities in the South of Scotland.

Final uses for the site remain to be agreed, but the site has locational advantage to act as an energy hub with opportunities including: business development with a particular focus on energy and energy supply chain; energy generation from solar; electricity storage; generation of heat; production and storage of low carbon and renewable hydrogen. This could link to ambitions for low-carbon heat and vehicle fuel at Stranraer.

The proposal aims to create new job opportunities, including high value employment. A community wealth building approach will ensure that benefits are retained locally as far as possible, and this in turn will help to sustain and grow the local population. We also support opportunities to reduce the fuel costs for local communities to tackle fuel poverty. Sustainable access to the site for workers and commercial vehicles will be required.

Location

Site of the former Chapelcross power station.

Need

This national development supports the reuse of a significant area of brownfield land in a rural area with economically fragile communities. It will also support the just transition to net zero.

Designation and classes of development

A development within the former Chapelcross power station site within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that would otherwise have been of a scale or type that is classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009', is designated a national development:

a) Commercial, industrial, manufacturing, and office related development occurring on the Chapelcross development site.

b) Generation of electricity from renewables of exceeding 50 megawatts capacity;

c) Production of low carbon and renewable hydrogen and related chemicals (including ammonia), its transmission, transportation and storage, with carbon capture as necessary; and

d) Active and sustainable travel connection to the site.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

12. Strategic Renewable Electricity Generation and Transmission Infrastructure

This national development supports renewable electricity generation, repowering, and expansion of the electricity grid.

A large increase in electricity generation from renewable sources will be essential for Scotland to meet its net zero emissions targets. Certain types of renewable electricity generation will also be required, alongside developments and increases in storage technology and capacity, to provide the vital services, including flexible response, that a zero carbon network will require. Generation is for consumption domestically as well as for export to the UK and beyond, with new capacity helping to decarbonise heat, transport and industrial energy demand. This has the potential to support jobs and business investment, with wider economic benefits.

The electricity transmission grid will need substantial reinforcement including the addition of new infrastructure to connect and transmit the output from new on and offshore capacity to consumers in Scotland, the rest of the UK and beyond. Delivery of this national development will be informed by market, policy and regulatory developments and decisions.

Location

All Scotland.

Need

Additional electricity generation from renewables and electricity transmission capacity of scale is fundamental to achieving a net zero economy and supports improved network resilience in rural and island areas. Island transmission connections in particular can facilitate capturing the significant renewable energy potential in those areas as well as delivering significant social and economic benefits.

Designation and classes of development

A development within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that is of a scale or type that would otherwise have been classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009', is designated a national development:

a) Electricity generation, including electricity storage, from renewables of or exceeding 50 megawatts capacity;

b) New and/or replacement high voltage electricity lines and interconnectors of 132kv or more; and

c) New and/or upgraded infrastructure directly supporting high voltage electricity lines and interconnectors including converter stations, switching stations and substations.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

13. High Speed Rail

This national development supports the implementation of increased infrastructure to improve rail capacity and connectivity on the main cross-border routes, the east and west coast mainlines.

Rail connectivity that can effectively compete with air and road based transport between the major towns and cities in Scotland, England and onward to Europe is an essential part of reducing transport emissions, making best use of the rail network and providing greater connectivity opportunities. There can be significant emissions savings of approximately 75% to be made when freight is transported by rail instead of road.

Enhancement would be in addition to and in conjunction with High Speed 2 (HS2) and other enhancements identified by the UK Government.

Scottish Ministers have an agreement with the UK Government to develop infrastructure enhancements 'North of HS2' and Scottish Ministers continue to press the UK Government on the imperative that all nations and regions of Britain benefit from the prosperity that HS2 will deliver both in its construction and its implementation. The Strategic Transport Projects Review 2 is appraising and will provide the strategic case for investment in the rail network in Scotland, over and above the commitments within HS2.

Location

Central and southern Scotland to the Border with England.

Need

This national development aims to ensure a low emissions air-competitive journey time to cities in the UK as well as connectivity with European cities and benefits to freight. This will support Scotland's ability to attract and compete for investment.

Designation and classes of development

A development within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that is of a scale or type that would otherwise have been classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009', is designated a national development:

a) New and/or upgraded railway track and electrification solution (overhead cabling and pylons or on track);

b) New and/or upgraded multi-modal railway stations to service high-speed lines; and

c) Depot facilities for high speed trains and/or related to the construction and onward maintenance of the UK high-speed rail infrastructure.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

National developments to deliver sustainable, distinctive places

14. Clyde Mission

A map showing the River Clyde, and the riverside from South Lanarkshire to Inverclyde and Argyll and Bute.

This national development is a national, place-based Mission to make the Clyde an engine of economic success for Glasgow, the city region and Scotland.

The Clyde Mission is focused on the River Clyde and the riverside from South Lanarkshire in the east to Inverclyde and Argyll and Bute in the west and focusing on an area up to around 500 metres from the river edge. This footprint includes the parts of the Clyde Gateway, River Clyde Waterfront, North Clyde River Bank and River Clyde Corridor frameworks.

Across this area significant land assets are under-utilised, and longstanding inequality, in relation to poor environment and health outcomes require to be tackled as a national priority. An ambitious redevelopment programme is being taken forward under Five Missions. It is a collective, cross-sector effort and partnership working will help bring forward assets and sites that are ready for redevelopment to sustain a range of uses. This will repurpose and reinvigorate vacant and derelict land and supporting local living as well as adapting the area to the impacts of climate change, where nature-based solutions would be particularly supported.

Location

The river and land immediately next to it (up to around 500 metres from the river) along its length.

Need

These classes of development revitalise a major waterfront asset which is currently under-utilised. This will support the delivery of our spatial strategy by attracting investment and reuse of vacant and derelict land in west central Scotland where there is a particular need to improve quality of place, generate employment and support disadvantaged communities. It will also support adaptation to climate risks.

Designation and classes of development

A development within the Clyde Mission area and within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that would otherwise have been of a scale or type that is classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009', is designated a national development:

a) Mixed use, including residential, redevelopment of vacant and derelict land;

b) New, reused and/or upgraded buildings and facilities for residential, commercial, business and industrial uses;

c) Upgrade of existing port and harbour assets for servicing marine functions including freight and cruise uses and associated landside commercial and/or industrial land for supporting services;

d) New and/or upgraded active and sustainable travel and recreation routes and infrastructure; and

e) New and/or upgraded infrastructure for climate adaptation, including nature-based, green and blue solutions.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net negative impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

15. Aberdeen Harbour

A map highlighting Aberdeen.

This national development supports the continued and repurposing of Aberdeen Harbour. The harbour is a strategically important asset supporting the economy of the north east of Scotland.

The south harbour can act as a cluster of port accessible offshore renewable energy research, manufacturing and support services. The facilities are also important for international connections.

At the south harbour the focus should be on regenerating existing industrial land and reorganising land use around the harbour in line with the spatial strategy of the local development plan. By focusing future port activity here, parts of the existing harbour in the city centre will become available for mixed use development, opening up development land to help reinvigorate in Aberdeen city centre.

This can help provide significant economic opportunities, in line with the objectives of the Aberdeen City Region Deal. Environmental benefits, for example to enhance access and improve the quality of green space and active travel options should be designed in to help offset any potential impacts on the amenity of local communities with relevant projects addressing environmental sensitivities through careful planning, assessment and implementation. As part of the consenting process, consideration through all relevant statutory assessment regimes such as Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Habitats Regulations Appraisal (HRA) will be required, where applicable at project level.

The extent to which this should include additional business and industrial development outwith the existing north and south harbours is a matter to be determined in the relevant local development plan, and is outwith the scope of this national development.

Location

Aberdeen Harbour, Aberdeen South Harbour.

Need

This national development supports the optimisation of Aberdeen Harbour to support net zero and stimulate economic investment. It is also a significant opportunity to support better placemaking including city centre transformation, and regeneration of existing land by optimising the use of new and existing assets. This will deliver our spatial strategy by helping the north east of Scotland to achieve a just transition from a high-carbon economy whilst improving quality of place.

Designation and classes of development

A development in the location within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that would otherwise have been of a scale or type that is classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009' is designated a national development:

a) Mixed use development reusing land at the existing (north) Aberdeen Harbour;

b) Upgraded port facilities at Aberdeen Harbour and completion of South Harbour;

c) New and/or upgraded green infrastructure;

d) Buildings and facilities for commercial, manufacturing and industrial uses;

e) Infrastructure for renewable hydrogen production and hydrogen production related chemicals including ammonia; and

f) Transport infrastructure, including for sustainable and active travel, for the South Harbour as supported by the Aberdeen City Region Deal.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

16. Dundee Waterfront

A map highlighting Dundee waterfront.

This national development supports the redevelopment of the Dundee Waterfront zones including: the Central Waterfront, Seabraes, City Quay, Dundee Port, Riverside Business Area and Nature Park, and the Michelin Scotland Innovation Parc.

Continued delivery of the waterfront transformation is crucial to securing the role of the city as a location for investment in the net zero economy. Supporting population growth alongside economic opportunities, and skills and career development, is important in continuing to demonstrate the sustainability of urban living in Scotland and a just transition to the net zero economy.

Further projects associated with this include: the Michelin Scotland Innovation Parc which will become an innovation hub for net zero emission mobility; the Eden Project; and an expansion to Dundee Port. This national development includes reusing land on and around the Dundee Waterfront to support the lifelong health and wellbeing of communities, deliver innovation and attract investment. As the development progresses it will be important to support sustainable and active transport options and to build in adaptation to future climate risks.

Location

Dundee Waterfront zones: Central Waterfront, Seabraes, City Quay, Dundee Port, Riverside Business Area and Riverside Park; Michelin Scotland Innovation Parc.

Need

This national development supports the continued revitalisation of Dundee waterfront, expanded to include Michelin Scotland Innovation Parc in support of the Tay Cities Regional Economic Strategy and its continued use for economic purposes. Waterfront locations may be particularly vulnerable to climate change and so development requires to be carefully designed to manage likely risks.

Designation and classes of development

A development in the location within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that would otherwise have been of a scale or type that is classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009' is designated a national development:

a) New and/or upgraded buildings for mixed use and/or residential development;

b) New and/or upgraded buildings for commercial, industrial, business, storage, distribution, research, educational, tourism use;

c) New and/or upgraded utilities;

d) New and/or upgraded active and sustainable travel routes;

e) Land reclamation for port expansion;

f) New and/or upgraded port facilities for vessel berthing and related landside activities including for lay-down, freight handling and marine sector services; and

g) New and/or upgraded green and blue infrastructure.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

17. Edinburgh Waterfront

A map highlighting Edinburgh waterfront.

This national development supports the regeneration of strategic sites along the Forth Waterfront in Edinburgh.

The waterfront is a strategic asset that contributes to the city's character and sense of place and includes significant opportunities for a wide range of future developments.

Development will include high quality mixed-use proposals that optimise the use of the strategic asset for residential, community, commercial and industrial purposes, including support for off-shore energy relating to port uses. Further cruise activity should take into account the need to manage impacts on transport infrastructure.

This will help maintain and grow Edinburgh's position as a capital city and commercial centre with a high quality and accessible living environment. Development locations and design will need to address future resilience to the risks from climate change, impact on health inequalities, and the potential to incorporate green and blue infrastructure.

Location

Edinburgh, initial focus on Leith to Granton.

Need

Waterfronts in our largest urban areas are frequently under-utilised and contain significant areas of vacant and derelict land as well as existing infrastructure assets. Their location may be particularly vulnerable to climate change and likely risks will require careful management. This will support delivery of our spatial strategy, which recognises the importance of our urban coastline in supporting our sense of place, economy and wellbeing.

Designation and classes of development

A development in the location within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that would otherwise have been of a scale or type that is classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009', is designated a national development:

a) New and/or upgraded buildings for mixed use and/or residential development;

b) New and/or upgraded buildings for commercial, industrial, business use;

c) New and/or upgraded utilities;

d) New and/or upgraded green and blue infrastructure;

e) New and/or upgraded active and sustainable travel routes;

f) New and/or upgraded port facilities for vessel berthing and related landside activities including for lay-down, and marine sector services.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

18. Stranraer Gateway

A map highlighting Stranraer.

This national development supports the regeneration of Stranraer.

Stranraer is a gateway town. It is located close to Cairnryan, a key port connecting Scotland to Northern Ireland, Ireland and beyond to wider markets.

High quality place-based regeneration will help address socio-economic inequalities in Stranraer and to support the wider population of south west Scotland by acting as a hub and providing a platform for future investment. This will be supported by any strategic transport interventions that emerge from the second Strategic Transport Projects Review which embeds the National Transport Strategy's sustainable travel and investment hierarchies.

Location

Stranraer and associated transport routes.

Need

Loch Ryan and Stranraer act as a gateway to Scotland. Reusing the assets in this location will support the wellbeing, economy and community in line with the regional growth deal. It will help to deliver our spatial strategy by driving forward regeneration of a key hub.

Designation and classes of development

A development in the location within one or more of the Classes of Development described below and that would otherwise have been of a scale or type that is classified as 'major' by 'The Town and Country Planning (Hierarchy of Developments) (Scotland) Regulations 2009', is designated a national development:

a) Development contributing to Stranraer Waterfront regeneration;

b) Marina expansion;

c) Redevelopment of Stranraer harbour east pier;

d) Sustainable road, rail and freight infrastructure for access to Stranraer and/or Cairnryan;

e) New and/or upgraded infrastructure for transportation and use of low carbon fuels; and

f) Reuse of vacant and derelict land and buildings, including regeneration of Blackparks industrial estate.

Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment

Depending on the nature of the projects taken forward and considering both direct and indirect effects, the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions assessment concludes this development will likely have an overall net positive impact on achieving national greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

Q19: Do you think that any of the classes of development described in the Statements of Need should be changed or additional classes added in order to deliver the national development described?

Q20: Is the level of information in the Statements of Need enough for communities, applicants and planning authorities to clearly decide when a proposal should be handled as a national development?

Q21: Do you think there are other developments, not already considered in supporting documents, that should be considered for national development status?


Contact

Email: scotplan@gov.scot