Publication - Research and analysis

Safeguarding Scotland's Resources - A Programme for the Efficient Use of Our Materials: Analysis of Consultation Responses

Published: 28 Jun 2013
Part of:
Research
ISBN:
9781782566298

In June 2012 the Scottish Government launched a consultation on Safeguarding Scotland's Resources - A Programme for the Efficient Use of Our Materials. This research findings report summarises the written responses to the consultation.

76 page PDF

755.3 kB

76 page PDF

755.3 kB

Contents
Safeguarding Scotland's Resources - A Programme for the Efficient Use of Our Materials: Analysis of Consultation Responses
Annex 2: Copies Of The Campaign Responses

76 page PDF

755.3 kB

Annex 2: Copies Of The Campaign Responses

1. WWF campaign response letter

Dear Sir/Madam

I am writing in response to the Scottish Government's consultation on resource efficiency.

Producing as little waste as possible and using materials much more efficiently is key to cutting our reliance on landfill, safeguarding precious resources upon which we all depend, and reducing climate emissions. The Government has made a welcome commitment to move towards a Zero Waste Scotland and the latest proposals on resource efficiency are an important part of this. However I think that the proposals should be strengthened in a number of areas.

1. Increase your ambition to reduce waste volume

I believe that if a Zero Waste Scotland is to become a reality, the scale of ambition within the proposals should be increased with an aim to cut waste volumes in half by 2025 through stepping up momentum on recycling, reuse and waste avoidance.

2. Introduce strong policies to reduce the amount of packaging materials going to landfill

In order to deliver the above, I would like to see the Government introduce policies such as a nation-wide deposit return system to reward people to reuse and recycle and delivering greater progress from businesses in Scotland to cut the packaging waste that they are responsible for.

3. Introduce a plastic bag charge

I support Government proposals to reduce the number of single use carrier bags used, which are symbolic of our wasteful attitude to resource use. Each year in Scotland nearly 600 million carrier bags are used, squandering non-renewable resources, polluting our environment, threatening wildlife and taking decades to break down in landfills. Charging for plastic bags has been highly successful in changing behaviour and cutting use elsewhere and we believe Scotland should follow suit.

I welcome the proposed plan of action to use resources more carefully and urge you to strengthen this in a number of areas in order to ensure that Scotland's Zero Waste future becomes a reality.

I am replying as an individual and am happy for my response and name to be published on the Scottish Government website, but not my address.

I understand that my name and address are required to identify me as an individual, so that my response can be included in the consultation analysis.

I am content for the Scottish Government to contact me again in relation to this consultation exercise.

Yours faithfully

2. Marine Conservation Society campaign letter

Dear

I am writing to respond as an individual to Question N of the Safeguarding Scotland's Resources consultation. I am happy for my response and name to be published on the Scottish Government website, but not my address. I am also happy for the Scottish Government to contact me again in relation to this consultation exercise.

I would like to see a single-use carrier bag levy introduced in Scotland as I believe that it is an important step in reducing one of the most obvious forms of pollution on land and at sea. I agree with the Marine Conservation Society's proposal that all bags at point of sale should be charged for, regardless of the material from which they are made. One of the main aims of the legislation should be to bring about a change in behaviour. Replacing one free bag with another made from a different material will not achieve this.

I would suggest that the terms 'single-use' or 'disposable' carrier bags could cause confusion. Many retailers and customers could argue that these bags are not single-use and are used again for bin liners, dog waste bags, or shopping. I am concerned that without carefully defining these terms this could cause potential problems in the future in enforcing the levy.

I would suggest that if all retailers have to comply with the regulations this would create a level playing field, which will make the regulations much easier to implement and enforce. I believe the proceeds of a levy should go to those charities and NGOs working on: litter and waste prevention and reduction; litter collection and surveying e.g. beach litter; recycling; and environmental protection and improvement.

Yours sincerely,


Contact

Email: Tim Chant