Publication - Consultation analysis

Planning Scotland's Seas: Scotland's National Marine Plan. Consultation Response Analysis Report

Published: 2 May 2014
Part of:
Marine and fisheries
ISBN:
9781784124182

Planning Scotland’s Seas: Scotland’s National Marine Plan was published for consultation in July 2013. Independent analysis of all written responses to the consultation has been undertaken and is presented in this report.

Planning Scotland's Seas: Scotland's National Marine Plan. Consultation Response Analysis Report
11 CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE (CCS)

11 CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE (CCS)

Chapter summary

  • A number of respondents noted their support for specific elements of this chapter or for carbon capture and storage ( CCS) in general, with some agreement that CCS has the potential to play a key role in helping to meet climate change targets and for Scotland to be recognised as a key player in the development of CCS technology. That said, some other respondents noted a degree of caution as it is early days in the development of CCS, which has yet to be proven on a commercial scale. Additionally, its impact on the environment is unknown.
  • There were references for the need to integrate marine and land use infrastructures; with some requests for more reference to NPF3 and identified National Developments. There was some support for the re-use of suitable existing redundant oil and gas pipelines.

11.1 The Draft NMP noted that the energy production sector, excluding nuclear power, is responsible for more than one third of Scotland's CO2 emissions, most of it from burning coal. The Scottish Government has a policy to decarbonise electricity generation by 2030 and carbon capture and storage ( CCS) technology can support this by mitigating large scale CO2 emissions from fossil fuel power plants and having industry. CCS infrastructure is likely to have the same spatial characteristics as the offshore oil and gas industry. There are a number of different technical solutions available to capture CO2 and then transport it to offshore sites. The challenge for this sector is to create the appropriate financial, regulatory and policy structures to enable the development of CCS projects in Scotland.

11.2 This chapter outlined key issues for marine planning, introduced two CCS marine planning policies and commented on the future for this sector, where it is hoped that Scotland can become a leader in CCS technology.

Comments on Carbon Capture and Storage

11.3 Two questions in relation to carbon capture and storage were asked:

Question 21: Do you have any comments on Carbon Capture and Storage, Chapter 10?

Question 22: Are there alternative planning policies that you think should be included in this chapter?

11.4 As shown in table 11.1, 32 respondents provided commentary to this question, across a range of groups.

Table 11.1 Question 21: Do you have any comments on Carbon Capture and Storage?

Respondent group
Individuals (16) 3
Academic / scientific (7) 2
Aquaculture (5) -
Energy (12) 5
Environment / conservation (9) 7
Fisheries (13) -
Historic / Heritage (5) 3
Industry / transport (9) 1
Local Authority (15) 3
Local coastal partnership (7) -
Local group (5) -
Other public sector (10) 5
Recreation / Tourism (7) 1
Other (4) 2
Total (124) 32

11.5 While a number of themes emerged, many were cited by only one respondent. A number of respondents simply noted their support for specific elements of the chapter or for the concept of CCS, with some agreeing that CCS has the potential to play a key role in helping to meet climate change targets and for Scotland to be recognised as a key player in the development of CCS technology. A respondent within the energy sector commented that this chapter has little mention of the importance of CCS for industrial sectors and requested more coverage of this subject, particularly in relation to the economic benefits of the sector, such as job creation or its contribution to the Scottish economy.

11.6 Some respondents made suggestions for changes to specific objectives, policies or the wording of other parts of this chapter.

11.7 There were some comments relating to the need to integrate marine and land use infrastructures. For example, there was some support for the use of marine utility corridors, although one energy company noted that consideration also needs to be given to gateways along the coast where the infrastructure can approach and make landfall. A Local Authority noted that CCS may require new pipelines from the point of capture to the point of storage which could impact on the possible landing points of transmission cables for power generated by offshore renewables.

11.8 Allied to this last point, some respondents noted the re-use of suitable existing redundant oil and gas pipelines is a sensible approach although there was a degree of caution as to the extent to which there will be a need for additional infrastructure to connect CCS plants to existing pipelines, which might negate the use of existing pipelines.

11.9 There was a degree of caution from a small number of respondents who noted that it is early days in the development of CCS; and that CCS still has to be proven on a commercial scale, along with its impact on the environment. For example respondents within the environment/ conservation sector noted that monitoring will be important or that there will be a need to acknowledge impacts on the marine historic environment that could result from CCS. One individual suggested the avoidance of CO2 storage beneath the seabed.

11.10 There were calls for greater integration with the land use planning system with more emphasis on NPF3 and identified National Developments. There were also a small number of suggestions for a greater level of consultation with a range of bodies including planning authorities, the community and other key stakeholders.

11.11 A respondent within the energy sector pointed to research that has been conducted which shows the local impacts of a CO2 leak within the marine environment to be minimal.

Additional policies

11.12 Question 22 asked about any additional policies that should be included in this chapter and only one respondent noted an additional policy. Some other respondents made suggestions for additions or modifications to the draft policies. The one suggestion was for:

  • A policy or statement detailing what will be set out in the regional marine plans with regard to this section.

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