Publication - Consultation paper

New Build Heat Standard: scoping consultation

Published: 9 Dec 2020
Directorate:
Energy and Climate Change Directorate
Part of:
Energy
ISBN:
9781800041387

We are committed to ensuring that, from 2024, new buildings must use heating systems which produce zero direct emissions at the point of use. We are currently developing our New Build Heat Standard to achieve this, and this scoping consultation sets out our initial vision.

New Build Heat Standard: scoping consultation
Chapter 1: Key Outcomes

Chapter 1: Key Outcomes

Outcomes

Key Outcomes

Outcome 1: Our new buildings no longer contribute to climate change

Outcome 2: Reduced demand for heating and cooling

Outcome 3: The cost of heating our new homes and non-residential buildings is affordable

Outcome 4: The systems we use in new buildings provide us with a reliable supply of heat

Outcome 5: Opportunities for retraining and upskilling of workforce across Scotland

Outcome 6: Informed, educated consumers

Outcome 7: Our indoor and outdoor spaces are with cleaner air

Outcome 8: Our heating systems are smart, enabling the flexible and stable operation of our energy networks

Outcome 9: There is a continued supply of high quality homes and non-residential buildings in line with identified requirements

There are nine key outcomes supported by transitioning to zero direct emissions heating systems, from 2024, in new buildings – they are informed by, and will contribute towards, the wider outcomes for heat in buildings, in our upcoming Heat in Buildings Strategy for Scotland.

Through this Scoping Consultation process, we are seeking the views and input from all stakeholders to ensure these outcomes are achievable and deliverable:

Outcome 1: Our new buildings no longer contribute to climate change

  • Through the use of zero direct emissions heating systems - coupled with very high levels of energy efficiency in new buildings - we have the opportunity to greatly reduce our emissions, while also living and working in the kind of homes and workplaces that are fundamental to happy and healthy lives.

Outcome 2: Reduced demand for heating and cooling

  • As set out in our Energy Efficient Scotland Route Map[6], there are numerous economic, social and health benefits that accrue from concerted effort to improve the energy efficiency of buildings.
  • These benefits extend to supporting the transition to zero emission heating systems. While the exact technology mix that will form Scotland’s future supply is not yet clear, we can be confident that requiring high standards of energy efficiency for our buildings will be essential.
  • By improving the energy performance of new buildings, zero direct emission heating systems – such as heat pumps and low-temperature heat networks – can be integrated and work effectively, regardless of what our heat supply looks like in future.
  • The rationale is not only technological: energy efficient buildings also reduce the demand for heat which, more widely (at a systems-level) may help to ease pressure on energy networks while also, potentially, resulting in reduced energy costs for consumers.

Outcome 3: The cost of heating our new homes and non-residential buildings is affordable

  • High energy costs are a challenge for many households and, for many of our businesses and public services, energy inefficiency and high energy bills add unnecessary financial burdens.
  • It is important to recognise there are may be cost differences between high emission and zero direct emission heating in new developments.
  • While these differences may adjust over time as technologies develop, markets and suppliers adapt, and consumer needs change, we can minimise any cost increases by using the evidence available to us to determine the most cost-effective systems in different areas of Scotland.
  • How any remaining cost increases are distributed has potentially important consequences for fuel poverty which will be considered in the Scottish Government’s upcoming Heat in Buildings Strategy for Scotland. That statement, along with our Fuel Poverty Strategy, will set out our approach to mitigating these impacts. The Fuel Poverty Strategy will also set out our approach to tackling the other drivers of fuel poverty.

Outcome 4: The systems we use in new buildings provide us with a reliable supply of heat

  • It is vital that the technologies we use in buildings and the wider energy systems behind them can be relied upon to provide us with heat and hot water when we need it.
  • Zero direct emissions heating and cooling systems must be installed and maintained by trained and qualified engineers, and it is vital that businesses are able to secure the parts and the workforce required to install and keep these systems running.
  • We will work with the energy networks to make use of Scotland’s existing and reliable infrastructure, wherever possible.

Outcome 5: Opportunities for retraining and upskilling of workforce across Scotland

  • Zero direct emission heating systems require assessment, design installation, maintenance, and fuel. This will need to be delivered by a prepared and skilled renewable heat sector, with reliable localised resources.
  • The supply chain will need to expand and grow to meet increased demand as heat decarbonisation rolls out. This will require the recruitment and training of technicians and engineers, and the establishment of localised hubs and workforces.
  • As we transition through to the decarbonisation of heat, support will be provided to ensure incumbent businesses and their employees can adapt. This will help maintain jobs and upskill our workforce.
  • By embracing these changes now, the supply chain can grow in advance of 2024 – and be well-placed to tackle the issue of decarbonising existing buildings beyond 2024.

Outcome 6: Informed, educated consumers

  • Awareness raising is key: while the importance of tackling climate change has been highlighted considerably in recent years, it is possible that many consumers are not aware of the role which heating our homes and businesses play – and how our efforts to tackle this may impact directly on them.
  • Therefore, it will be important to consider how we (the Scottish Government, industry and wider-partners) can communicate the significance of the proposed changes outlined within this document to consumers across Scotland in advance of 2024.
  • As the technologies and fuels used to heat our buildings change, it is also important that consumers have the confidence and reassurance to know that their homes and businesses will have a reliable energy supply and, should there be a fault or breakdown, there will be a qualified and competent engineer available to resolve any issue.

Outcome 7: Our indoor and outdoor spaces are with cleaner air

  • Buildings can lose significantly more heat when they are poorly insulated and, when these buildings are also using high emissions heating systems, they can emit NOx - which pollutes the air we breathe[7].
  • Better building insulation and ventilation, more passive heat technologies, low input heat recovery systems, and minimising heat loss or inefficient heating ultimately reduce energy use and the need for supplementary domestic heating.

Outcome 8: Our heating systems are smart, enabling the flexible and stable operation of our energy networks

  • Our heating systems must be designed to be flexible, adjusting alongside other technologies associated with our properties that

have high electrical demand (such as electric vehicles charging infrastructure), to support sustainable and secure electricity networks.

  • The heating technologies which can support secure and reliable electricity networks are the same as those needed to ensure efficient use of renewable electricity: demand-side flexibility, the incorporation of smart systems and technologies, the use of battery and thermal storage.

Outcome 9: There is a continued supply of high quality homes and non-residential buildings in line with identified requirements

  • The shift towards zero direct emission heating should continue to support the delivery of high quality new homes and non-residential buildings across Scotland - ensuring we can meet the needs of Scotland’s people.
  • Measures to reduce the demand for heat in new homes are essential for meeting this objective, helping to ensure that new homes are more affordable to heat.

Questions

1. Do you agree with the above key outcomes? Please explain your view.

2. Are there any additional outcomes which should be embedded here?


Contact

Email: 2024heatstandard@gov.scot