Publication - Research and analysis

Mapping Organisations Responding to Food Insecurity in Scotland

Published: 7 May 2020
Directorate:
Housing and Social Justice Directorate
Part of:
Research
ISBN:
9781839605871

Research commissioned by the Scottish Government to provide a snapshot of where and how organisations are responding to food insecurity in Scotland.

43 page PDF

553.4 kB

43 page PDF

553.4 kB

Contents
Mapping Organisations Responding to Food Insecurity in Scotland
Footnotes

43 page PDF

553.4 kB

Footnotes

1. An organisation may provide free or subsidised food via multiple locations, projects or groups. The use of the term "venue" here refers to the locations, projects or groups through which food is provided.

2. "Ambient food" was defined to survey respondents as "foods that can be safely stored at room temperature in a sealed container, such as tins, cartons or pouches".

3. Dowler E. (2003). Food and Poverty in Britain: Rights and Responsibilities. In: Dowler E and Jones Finer C (Eds). Welfare of Food: Rights and Responsibilities in a Changing World. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, p140-159.

4. A Menu for Change (2019). Found Wanting: Understanding journeys into and out of food insecurity: a longitudinal study. Glasgow.
Available from: https://menuforchange.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Found-Wanting-A-Menu-for-Change-FINAL.pdf

5. The Scottish Government (2016). Dignity: Ending Hunger Together in Scotland - The Report of the Independent Working Group on Food Poverty. Edinburgh.
Available from: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2016/06/8020

6. The Scottish Government (2018). Scottish health survey 2017: volume 1 - main report. Edinburgh
Available from: https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-health-survey-2017-volume-1-main-report/

7. The Scottish Government (2019). Scottish health survey 2018: volume 1 - main report.Edinburgh.
Available from: https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-health-survey-2018-volume-1-main-report/

8. Analysis based on combined data from the 2017 and 2018 Scottish Health Surveys to increase sample size. The Scottish Government (2020). Scottish health survey 2018: supplementary tables.
Available from: https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-health-survey-2018-supplementary-tables/

9. The Scottish Government (2019). Scottish health survey 2018: volume 1 - main report.Edinburgh.
Available from: https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-health-survey-2018-volume-1-main-report/

10. The Scottish Government (2013). Overview of Food Aid Provision in Scotland. Edinburgh.
Available from: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2013/12/8757

11. Based on information available on the Trussell Trust website:
https://www.trusselltrust.org/get-help/find-a-foodbank/

12. Based on information available on the Independent Food Aid Network website:
http://www.foodaidnetwork.org.uk/our-members

13. The three-day food parcels provided by the Trussell Trust typically comprises a selection of non-perishable, so-called 'ambient' food items, such as cereal, soup, pasta, tinned meat and vegetables and milk. The aim is to ensure basic calorific and nutritional needs are met, allowing for at least three days of health meals for individuals and families.

14. Trussell Trust, End of Year Stats 2019.
Available from: https://www.trusselltrust.org/news-and-blog/latest-stats/end-year-stats/

15. IFAN & A Menu for Change (2020). Emergency Food Parcel Provision in Scotland; April 2018 to September 2019. Glasgow.
Available from: https://menuforchange.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/IFAN-Menu-for-Change-Briefing-January-2020.pdf

16. The Scottish Government (2019). Emergency Food Parcel Provision in Scotland: April 2017 to September 2018. Glasgow.
Available from: https://menuforchange.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Emergency-Food-Parcel-Provision-in-Scotland-Apr-2017-to-Sep-2018.pdf

17. Douglas F, Ejebu O-Z, Garcia A, MacKenzie F, Whybrow S, McKenzie L, Ludbrook A, Dowler E. (2015). The nature and extent of food poverty/insecurity in Scotland. 10.13140/RG.2.1.4898.0963.

18. A Menu for Change (2019). Found Wanting: Understanding journeys into and out of food insecurity: a longitudinal study. Glasgow:
Available from: https://menuforchange.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Found-Wanting-A-Menu-for-Change-FINAL.pdf

19. The Trussell Trust (2019).State of Hunger: A study of poverty and food insecurity in the UK.
Available from: https://www.trusselltrust.org/state-of-hunger/

20. The Trussell Trust (2019). State of Hunger: A study of poverty and food insecurity in the UK.
Available from: https://www.trusselltrust.org/state-of-hunger/

21. Emergency Food – How to Get a Food Voucher
https://www.trusselltrust.org/get-help/

22. The Trussell Trust (2019). End of Year Stats 2019.
Available from: https://www.trusselltrust.org/news-and-blog/latest-stats/end-year-stats/

23. The Trussell Trust (2019).State of Hunger: A study of poverty and food insecurity in the UK.
Available from: https://www.trusselltrust.org/state-of-hunger/

24. The Trussell Trust (2017). Early Warnings: Universal Credit and Foodbanks.
Available from: https://www.trusselltrust.org/what-we-do/research-advocacy/universal-credit-and-foodbank-use/

25. The Trussell Trust (2019).State of Hunger: A study of poverty and food insecurity in the UK.
Available from: https://www.trusselltrust.org/state-of-hunger/

26. Citizens Advice Service (2016). Living Life at the Sharp End: CAB Clients in Crisis.
Available from: http://www.cas.org.uk/publications/living-sharp-end

27. Garthwaite K. (2016) Hunger Pains: Life inside foodbank Britain. Bristol: Policy Press.

28. Lambie-Mumford, H. (2017). Hungry Britain: the rise of food charity. Bristol: Policy Press.

29. Williams, A., Cloke, P., May, J., & Goodwin, M. (2016). Contested space: The contradictory political dynamics of food banking in the UK. Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, 48(11), 2291-2316.

30. MacLeod MA et al. (2016). Briefing paper 28: Food bank use among residents of Glasgow's deprived neighbourhoods. Glasgow: GoWell.

31. The Trussell Trust (2019).State of Hunger: A study of poverty and food insecurity in the UK.
Available from: https://www.trusselltrust.org/state-of-hunger/

32. MacLeod MA et al. (2016). Briefing paper 28: Food bank use among residents of Glasgow's deprived neighbourhoods. Glasgow: GoWell.

33. Douglas F, Ejebu O-Z, Garcia A, MacKenzie F, Whybrow S, McKenzie L, Ludbrook A, Dowler E. (2015). The nature and extent of food poverty/insecurity in Scotland. 10.13140/RG.2.1.4898.0963.

34. MacLeod MA et al. (2016). Briefing paper 28: Food bank use among residents of Glasgow's deprived neighbourhoods. Glasgow: GoWell.

35. Castlemilk Law and Money Advice Centre (2016). Why people go to foodbanks: A year of advice-giving at Glasgow South East Foodbank. Glasgow.

36.The Scottish Government (2016). Dignity: Ending Hunger Together in Scotland - The Report of the Independent Working Group on Food Poverty. Edinburgh.
Available from: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2016/06/8020

37. Found Wanting: Understanding journeys into and out of food insecurity: a longitudinal study. Glasgow: Menu for Change (2019).
Available from: https://menuforchange.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Found-Wanting-A-Menu-for-Change-FINAL.pdf

38. The Scottish Government (2019). Scottish Welfare Fund Statistics: Update to 30 June 2019. Scottish Government.
Available from: https://www2.gov.scot/Resource/0054/00548713.pdf

39. The Scottish Government (2019). Fair Food Transformation Fund: Independent Review.
Available from: https://www.gov.scot/publications/review-fair-food-transformation-fund/pages/1/

40. To conduct the search, the key words "free food", "community meal", "food bank" (and "foodbank"), "community café" were used alongside the name of the local authority and the name of two to three main towns in each local authority (e.g. Kirkcaldy, Dunfermline, Cupar, and St Andrews when researching Fife).

41. An organisation may provide free or subsidised via multiple locations, projects or groups. The use of the term "venue'" here refers to the locations, projects or groups through which food is provided.

42. All but one of the survey questions were optional to complete, meaning respondents could skip questions so not all survey responses covered all information requested.

43. The majority of these organisations reported collecting and/or distributing food to food banks and/or community groups, being part of coordinating networks or providing other support to vulnerable groups.

44. This question was multiple choice tick box question so percentages may not sum to 100. Completion of this question was compulsory.

45. Whilst the survey was open for responses, some respondents questioned what was meant by the term "subsidised food". For example, some community cafes in particular were reliant on volunteers to run but the food provided was generally provided at 'market price'. Therefore, it is possible that this figure may underestimate the proportion of organisations providing subsidised food.

46. This was a multiple choice tick box question so percentages may not sum to 100.

47. This was a free-text entry box question.

48. This was a multiple choice tick box question so percentages may not sum to 100.

49. This was a multiple choice tick box question so percentages may not sum to 100.

50. This was a free-text entry box question.

51. This was a multiple choice tick box question so percentages may not sum to 100.

52. This was a multiple choice tick box question so responses may not sum to 100. Despite the question wording, some responses to this question were received from some organisation who reported that they did not provide food parcels. Therefore, responses to this question were filtered during data analyses to include only organisations who reported providing food parcels in some form.

53. "Ambient food" was defined to survey respondents as "foods that can be safely stored at room temperature in a sealed container, such as tins, cartons or pouches".

54. This was a free-text entry box for each day of the week

55. The Scottish Welfare Fund is a national scheme, underpinned by law and delivered on behalf of the Scottish Government by all 32 local authorities. It aims to provide a safety net to people on low incomes by the provision of Crisis Grants and Community Care Grants.


Contact

Email: socialresearch@gov.scot