Publication - Progress report

Long-Term Monitoring of Health Inequalities

Published: 25 Oct 2011
Part of:
Health and social care
ISBN:
9781780454672

An annual report which summarises the long-term differences in health trends between the least and most deprived areas of Scotland.

39 page PDF

0 B

39 page PDF

0 B

Contents
Long-Term Monitoring of Health Inequalities
Low Birthweight

39 page PDF

0 B

Low Birthweight

Summary

  • Inequalities are narrowing in both absolute and relative terms

Between 1998 and 2009 the number and percentage of low birthweight babies has been relatively stable. Around 3,000 low birthweight babies are born each year (around 5% of total live, singleton births in Scotland). As found previously, low birthweight babies are more common in deprived areas than in areas of low deprivation. In 2009 the percentage in the most deprived decile was 6.9 compared to 3.3 in the least deprived decile - a difference of 3.6 percentage points. However, inequalities have narrowed in both absolute (as demonstrated by the absolute range) and relative terms (as demonstrated by the RII). This is mainly due to a reduction in the most deprived deciles as the percentage of low birthweight babies in the least deprived decile has remained fairly stable in recent years.

Inequalities gradient in the most recent year available

Low birthweight babies by Income-Employment Index: Scotland 2009

Relative Index of Inequality ( RII) over time

Relative Index of Inequality (RII): Low birthweight babies Scotland 1998-2009

Absolute range over time

Absolute range: Low birthweight babies - Scotland 1998-2009

Scale / context

Number of low BW babies Target population size (live singleton births) Percentage
1998 3,108 55,152 5.6
1999 3,098 52,726 5.9
2000 2,906 51,082 5.7
2001 2,848 49,752 5.7
2002 2,910 48,952 5.9
2003 3,026 50,071 6.0
2004 3,030 51,852 5.8
2005 3,056 51,372 5.9
2006 2,928 52,286 5.6
2007 1 3,095 55,086 5.6
2008 1 3,134 56,738 5.5
2009 2,896 55,797 5.2

1. The 2007 and 2008 data has been revised since the publication of the October 2010 report.