Publication - Advice and guidance

Epizootic haemorrhagic disease: how to spot and report the disease

Published: 31 Oct 2018

Advice on what to do if you suspect there is an outbreak of this infectious disease. 

Published:
31 Oct 2018
Epizootic haemorrhagic disease: how to spot and report the disease

Epizootic haemorrhagic disease affects deer, cattle and other ruminants (animals that chew cud, like goats and sheep). It does not affect humans.

Latest situation: there has never been a reported case of epizootic haemorrhagic disease in Great Britain.

Clinical signs

Epizootic haemorrhagic disease mainly affects deer.

Clinical signs are only likely to be seen when infection is acute (severe). In such cases the main symptoms are:

  • fever
  • weakness
  • lack of appetite
  • more salivation than usual
  • bleeding
  • swollen red skin near hooves
  • swollen lining of the mouth

In other cases infection is not detectable.

If you suspect signs of any notifiable diseases, you must immediately notify your Scotland: field service local office at the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA). Failure to do so is an offence. 

How epizootic haemorrhagic disease is spread

The virus is usually spread when midges that carry it bite animals that can be infected.

Human health implications

There are no human health implications because the disease is not zoonotic.

How to control the disease

If epizootic haemorrhagic disease is confirmed, the outbreak will be controlled in line with the contingency framework for exotic notifiable animal diseases.

Legislation

Epizootic haemorrhagic disease is covered by the Specified Diseases (Notification and Slaughter) Order 1992 and the Specified Diseases (Notification) Order 1996.

Biosecurity

Biosecurity is about being aware of the ways disease can spread and taking every practical measure to minimise the risk of disease spreading. The advice details practical things you can do on your farm to help prevent the introduction and spread of epizootic haemorrhagic disease to and from your animals.

Contact

If you suspect signs of any notifiable diseases, you must immediately notify your Scotland: field service local office at the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA). Failure to do so is an offence.