Information

Energy Efficient Scotland: strategic environmental assessment

This Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) investigates the likely significant effects on the environment by the implementation of the Energy Efficient Scotland programme.


Appendix C - Assessment Tables for Energy Efficient Scotland – Long Term standard

This Appendix contains the assessment tables developed for each sector affected by the proposed introduction of a long term standard. These tables set out the potential for positive and negative impacts across a range of environmental receptors for each proposed policy, policy development milestone, and proposal which form a part of the long term standard.

The environmental effects are presented in two formats within the tables:

  • A narrative describing the potential for environmental environment effects – the 'Likely Environmental Effects' narrative sections broadly discuss the likely primary environmental impacts associated with the policy or proposal, whilst also identifying the potential for secondary or indirect impacts.
  • Colour-coded gradings assigned to the individual environmental topic areas scoped into the assessment – the gradings reflect the likely primary impacts associated with the implementation of the policy/proposal against each environmental topic.

While this narrative also discusses the potential for secondary or indirect impacts, these effects have only been reflected in the gradings where it is considered that no mitigation is currently in place, and where these impacts are likely to be significant. This approach has been taken to enable the reader to readily identify the primary significant impacts associated with each policy and proposal.

The tables also outline any assumptions made in undertaking the assessment and where relevant, refer to previous SEA work that informed the assessment.

The gradings used are:

+

Potential for positive environmental effects

-

Potential for negative environmental effects

+/-

Potential for mixed environmental effects

0

Potential for environmental effects has not been identified

Policies and Proposals

Biodiversity

Population and Human Health

Soil

Water

Landscape

Air

Climatic Factors

Cultural heritage

Material Assets

Likely Environmental Effects

Owner Occupier

Use of EPC standards for all domestic properties as a recognisable and established metric

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

This proposal seeks to use the EPC rating as the metric by which the energy efficiency of all owner occupier properties in Scotland will be measured. This includes the use of the current EPC measure and works to build on the methodology behind this metric. The standard, in itself will not have any significant environmental effects, but is pivotal in the work to apply the standard, once set.

Assumptions:

The setting of EPC as the metric will provide clarity in terms of expectations on the required standard for property owners

Previous SEA work

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030.

Set an end date for compliance to meet EPC band C by 2040

+/-

+

0

0

+/-

+/-

+

+/-

+

This proposal sets a target date for compliance to meet the standard set ( EPC C) subject to review. This milestone gives clarity on the speed of travel required and will be matched with incentives for owner occupiers to meet the standard in advance of the end date. This will result in a gradual improvement in the energy efficiency of all owner occupier properties, and consequential reduction in GHG emissions with secondary benefits for other associated topics through improved human health, air quality, and climatic factors.

The setting of standards and dates also supports the development of the supply chain which will be required to support the retrofitting of existing stock. The ability to prioritise refurbishment over demolition will support the continued use of the existing building stock, thus having a positive impact on material assets.

At a local scale, the installation of energy efficiency measures may have impacts associated with nuisance, including noise, dust, and visual. However these are likely to be short term in nature, and can be mitigated with careful use of construction management planning and dialogue with neighbours. They may also have localised visual impacts, which have the potential to have a mixed impact and will require local assessment to ensure use of measures is appropriate for the surroundings. .

The installation of energy efficiency measures is recognised as having an impact on some biodiversity, specifically those using roofs and wall cavities as nest sites. Licensing arrangements are already in place to protect these species and act as a deterrent to halt inappropriate actions which would adversely impact these species. As a result it is unlikely that the introduction of new or additional energy efficiency measures would have a significant effect on these species.

The installation of energy efficiency measures may also have a mixed impact on traditional and culturally significant buildings. Other aspects of the setting of the proposal (see below), however provide mitigation through the identification of exemptions to the standard, which will allow targeted measures to be applied on a building by building basis. Installation of energy efficiency measures will still be subject to listing and conversation area controls reducing the likelihood of significant effects. Use will be made of measures appropriate for such buildings drawing on research undertaken by Historic Environment Scotland

Assumptions

Incentives will be used to encourage owner occupiers to adopt the standard in advance of the backstop date

The introduction of the end date will be matched with clarity on compliance measures.

Work will continue to progress technological solutions for energy efficiency measures for hard to tackle properties.

Previous SEA work

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030

Set non-statutory stretch targets for fuel poor:

  • EPC band C by 2030
  • EPC band B by 2040

+/-

+

0

0

+/-

+/-

+

+/-

+

This proposals seeks to support those in fuel poverty by introducing non-statutory targets to escalate improvements in the energy efficiency of residential properties occupied by that section of the population. The result will be as that for the setting of the backstop date (above), but the speed of travel will be swifter.

Assumptions:

Incentives will be used to support those in fuel poverty reach a higher standard than is applicable to other owner occupied properties.

Previous SEA work:

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030.

Clarity on exemptions to the standard and the timeframes

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

+

+

This proposal will provide clarity to owner occupiers on any exceptions to the requirement to meet the standard. This will be particularly important when considering what is technically feasible on hard to tackle and historic properties. As a result this will have a direct impact on buildings of cultural significance and other material assets which may be identified as not requiring the application of energy efficiency measures to meet the standard.

Assumptions:

This proposal will be matched with work to support technological advances to reduce the number of properties to be exempt from the standard.

Previous SEA work:

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030.

Introduction of mandatory action (compliance and enforcement) after 2030, subject to a review of progress

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

This proposal seeks to establish the principle of compliance and enforcement measures which will be introduced at the backstop date. The measures established, in themselves will not have any significant environmental effects, but will be pivotal in the work to apply the standard, once set.

Assumptions:

The establishment of compliance and enforcement measures will provide clarity in regulatory measures which will be introduced to match with the backstop date.

Previous SEA work:

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030

Summary of Overall Effects

There is potential for broadly positive environmental effects. In particular, the setting of a long term standard could contribute to further reductions in GHG emissions ( climatic factors) by improving energy efficiency in buildings across Scotland, and thus reducing demand for fuel. The proposal aims to set milestones and end dates for compliance (subject to a review of progress) which will, in turn, drive the speed of works required by the standard, thus having a likely beneficial impact ( climatic factors, air, population and human health). There is potential for further benefits in improving flexibility of supply through energy efficiency measures installed to meet the standard ( material assets, population and health) and reduced reliance on existing fossil fuel energy sources ( climatic factors). The ability to prioritise refurbishment over demolition will support the continued use of the existing building stock, thus having a positive impact on material assets.

There is potential for mixed or adverse effects associated with some aspects of the proposal, particularly those associated with development at a local scale. For example, the installation of energy efficiency measures could result in environmental effects, including impacts to biodiversity and air from construction activities and siting of developments, and visual impacts associated with the retrofitting of measures to existing building stock. This is also the case with traditional and culturally significant properties. In the case of the former, specific environmental effects will be considered through the planning process such as Listed Building Consent, and on a site by site basis, and the use of appropriate construction management measures such as Environmental Management Plans. In the case of the latter, the clarity provided regarding exceptions allows suitable mitigation.

Policies and Proposals

Biodiversity

Population and Human Health

Soil

Water

Landscape

Air

Climatic Factors

Cultural heritage

Material Assets

Likely Environmental Effects

Private Rented Sector

Use of EPC standards for all domestic properties as a recognisable and established metric

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

This proposal seeks to use the EPC rating as the metric by which the energy efficiency of all privately rented properties in Scotland will be measured. This includes the use of the current EPC measure and works to build on the methodology behind this metric. The standard, in itself will not have any significant environmental effects, but is pivotal in the work to apply the standard, once set.

Assumptions:

The setting of EPC as the metric will provide clarity in terms of expectations on the required standard for property owners

Previous SEA work

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030

Set mandatory compliance dates of EPC band D by early 2020s and that the long term standard be met by 2030 in all PRS EPC band C by 2030

+/-

+

0

0

+/-

+/-

+

+/-

+

This proposal sets backstop dates for compliance to meet the standard set which are at an escalated timeframe to that for owner occupied properties. These milestone give clarity on the speed of travel required and give clarity on the Scottish Government's commitment to improve the quality of the private rented sector in Scotland. These dates will result in a gradual improvement in the energy efficiency of all privately rented properties, and consequential reduction in GHG emissions with secondary benefits for other associated topics through improved human health, air quality, and climatic factors. There is potential for further improvements in air quality associated with the reduction in energy demand from traditional and finite fossil fuel sources.

The setting of standards and dates also supports the development of the supply chain which will be required to support the retrofitting of existing stock. The ability to prioritise refurbishment over demolition will support the continued use of the existing building stock, thus having a positive impact on material assets.

At a local scale, the installation of energy efficiency measures may have impacts associated with nuisance, including noise, dust, and visual. However these are likely to be short term in nature, and can be mitigated with careful use of construction management planning and dialogue with neighbours. They may also have localised visual impacts, which have the potential to have a mixed impact and will require local assessment to ensure use of measures is appropriate for the surroundings.

The installation of energy efficiency measures is recognised as having an impact on some biodiversity, specifically those using roofs and wall cavities as nest sites. Licensing arrangements are already in place to protect these species and act as a deterrent to halt inappropriate actions which would adversely impact these species. As a result it is unlikely that the introduction of new or additional energy efficiency measures would have a significant effect on these species.

Assumptions:

Incentives will be used to encourage property owners to adopt the standard in advance of the backstop date

The introduction of the end date will be matched with clarity on compliance measures.

Work will continue to progress technological solutions for energy efficiency measures for hard to tackle properties.

Previous SEA work

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030

Set non-statutory stretch targets for fuel poor:

  • EPC band C by 2030
  • EPC band B by 2040

+/-

+

0

0

+/-

+/-

+

+/-

+

This proposals seeks to support those in fuel poverty by introducing non-statutory targets to escalate improvements in the energy efficiency of residential properties occupied by that section of the population. The result will be as that for the setting of the backstop date (above), but the speed of travel will be swifter.

The setting of standards and dates also supports the development of the supply chain which will be required to support the retrofitting of existing stock. The ability to prioritise refurbishment over demolition will support the continued use of the existing building stock, thus having a positive impact on material assets.

At a local scale, the installation of energy efficiency measures may have impacts associated with nuisance, including noise, dust, and visual. However these are likely to be short term in nature, and can be mitigated with careful use of construction management planning and dialogue with neighbours. They may also have localised visual impacts, which have the potential to have a mixed impact and will require local assessment to ensure use of measures is appropriate for the surroundings.

The installation of energy efficiency measures may also have a mixed impact on traditional and culturally significant buildings. Other aspects of the setting of the proposal (see below), however provide mitigation through the identification of exemptions to the standard, which will allow targeted measures to be applied on a building by building basis. Installation of energy efficiency measures will still be subject to listing and conversation area controls reducing the likelihood of significant effects. Use will be made of measures appropriate for such buildings drawing on research undertaken by Historic Environment Scotland

Assumptions:

Incentives will be used to support those in fuel poverty reach a higher standard than is applicable to other private rented properties.

Previous SEA work

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030

Clarity on any exemptions to the standard and the timeframes

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

+

+

This proposal will provide clarity to private rented property owners on any exceptions to the requirement to meet the standard. This will be particularly important when considering what is technically feasible on hard to tackle and historic properties. As a result this will have a direct impact on buildings of cultural significance and other material assets which may be identified as not requiring the application of energy efficiency measures to meet the standard.

Assumptions:

This proposal will be matched with work to support technological advances to reduce the number of properties to be exempt from the standard.

Previous SEA work:

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030

Introduction of mandatory action (compliance and enforcement) after 2030, subject to a review of progress

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

This proposal seeks to establish the principle of compliance and enforcement measures which will be introduced at the backstop date. The measures established, in themselves will not have any significant environmental effects, but will be pivotal in the work to apply the standard, once set.

Assumptions:

The establishment of compliance and enforcement measures will provide clarity in regulatory measures which will be introduced to match with the backstop date.

Previous SEA work:

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030

Summary of Overall Effects

There is potential for broadly positive environmental effects. In particular, the setting of a long term standard could contribute to further reductions in GHG emissions ( climatic factors) by improving energy efficiency in buildings across Scotland, and thus reducing demand for fuel. The proposal aims to set milestones and end dates for compliance (subject to a review of progress) which will, in turn, drive the speed of works required by the standard, thus having a likely beneficial impact ( climatic factors, air, population and human health). There is potential for further benefits in improving flexibility of supply through energy efficiency measures installed to meet the standard ( material assets, population and health) and reduced reliance on existing fossil fuel energy sources ( climatic factors). The ability to prioritise refurbishment over demolition will support the continued use of the existing building stock, thus having a positive impact on material assets.

There is potential for mixed or adverse effects associated with some aspects of the proposal, particularly those associated with development at a local scale. For example, the installation of energy efficiency measures could result in environmental effects, including impacts to biodiversity and air from construction activities and siting of developments, and visual impacts associated with the retrofitting of measures to existing building stock. This is also the case with traditional and culturally significant properties. In the case of the former, specific environmental effects will be considered through the planning process such as Listed Building Consent, and on a site by site basis, and the use of appropriate construction management measures such as Environmental Management Plans. In the case of the latter, the clarity provided regarding exceptions allows suitable mitigation.

Policies and Proposals

Biodiversity

Population and Human Health

Soil

Water

Landscape

Air

Climatic Factors

Cultural heritage

Material Assets

Likely Environmental Effects

Social Rented Housing ( EESSH)

2025 - soft milestone and review

+/-

+

0

0

+/-

+/-

+

+/-

+

This proposal sets a review point of 2025 (or possibly earlier, depending on any hydrogen policy announcements from the UK Government) to confirm progress towards meeting the 2032 milestone, and finalise its detail. This review point will give clarity on the speed and direction of travel required and on the Scottish Government's commitment to improve the quality and energy efficiency of the social rented sector in Scotland. To 2025 social landlords are expected to initially focus on brining rural/off gas grid properties as far as possible up to the 2020 standard (and where feasible, beyond to EESSH2 2032 target). This review point is expected to report a continued improvement in the energy efficiency of the social rented sector, and consequential reduction in GHG emissions with secondary benefits for other associated topics through improved human health, air quality, and climatic factors. At the 2025 review point, and following a period of data collection and analysis air, elements on ensuring no detriment to air quality and environmental impact will also be confirmed within the standard. There is potential for further improvements in air quality associated with the reduction in energy demand from traditional and finite fossil fuel sources.

The setting of standards and dates also supports the development of the supply chain which will be required to support the retrofitting of existing stock. The ability to prioritise refurbishment over demolition will support the continued use of the existing building stock, thus having a positive impact on material assets.

At a local scale, the installation of energy efficiency measures may have impacts associated with nuisance, including noise, dust, and visual. However these are likely to be short term in nature, and can be mitigated with careful use of construction management planning and dialogue with neighbours. They may also have localised visual impacts, which have the potential to have a mixed impact and will require local assessment to ensure use of measures is appropriate for the surroundings.

The installation of energy efficiency measures is recognised as having an impact on some biodiversity, specifically those using roofs and wall cavities as nest sites. Licensing arrangements are already in place to protect these species and act as a deterrent to halt inappropriate actions which would adversely impact these species. As a result it is unlikely that the introduction of new or additional energy efficiency measures would have a significant effect on these species.

The installation of energy efficiency measures may also have a mixed impact on traditional and culturally significant buildings. Other aspects of the setting of the proposal (see below), however provide mitigation through the identification of exemptions to the standard, which will allow targeted measures to be applied on a building by building basis. Installation of energy efficiency measures will still be subject to listing and conversation area controls reducing the likelihood of significant effects. Use will be made of measures appropriate for such buildings drawing on research undertaken by Historic Environment Scotland

Assumptions:

The social rented sector will continue to receive support to allow it to act as an exemplar in residential energy efficiency across Scotland.

Previous SEA work:

SEA of policy on Climate Change Standard for Social Rented Housing (phase 1 of EESSH) available at http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Environment/environmental-assessment/sea/SEAG

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030

2032 - EESSH2 milestone

+/-

+

0

0

+/-

+/-

+

+/-

+

This proposal sets a milestone 2032 for meeting the new EESSH2 standard (to maximise the number of homes meeting EPC Band B). This milestone gives clarity on the speed and direction of travel required and on the Scottish Government's commitment to improve the energy efficiency and quality of the social rented sector in Scotland. This milestone is expected to result in a continued improvement in the energy efficiency of the social rented sector, and consequential reduction in GHG emissions with secondary benefits for other associated topics through improved human health, air quality, and climatic factors. There is potential for further improvements in air quality associated with the reduction in energy demand from traditional and finite fossil fuel sources.

The setting of standards and dates also supports the development of the supply chain which will be required to support the retrofitting of existing stock. The ability to prioritise refurbishment over demolition will support the continued use of the existing building stock, thus having a positive impact on material assets.

At a local scale, the installation of energy efficiency measures may have impacts associated with nuisance, including noise, dust, and visual. However these are likely to be short term in nature, and can be mitigated with careful use of construction management planning and dialogue with neighbours. They may also have localised visual impacts, which have the potential to have a mixed impact and will require local assessment to ensure use of measures is appropriate for the surroundings.

The installation of energy efficiency measures is recognised as having an impact on some biodiversity, specifically those using roofs and wall cavities as nest sites. Licensing arrangements are already in place to protect these species and act as a deterrent to halt inappropriate actions which would adversely impact these species. As a result it is unlikely that the introduction of new or additional energy efficiency measures would have a significant effect on these species.

The installation of energy efficiency measures may also have a mixed impact on traditional and culturally significant buildings. Other aspects of the setting of the proposal (see below), however provide mitigation through the identification of exemptions to the standard, which will allow targeted measures to be applied on a building by building basis. Installation of energy efficiency measures will still be subject to listing and conversation area controls reducing the likelihood of significant effects. Use will be made of measures appropriate for such buildings drawing on research undertaken by Historic Environment Scotland

Assumptions:

The social rented sector will continue to receive support to allow it to act as an exemplar in residential energy efficiency across Scotland.

Previous SEA work:

SEA of policy on Climate Change Standard for Social Housing (phase 1 of EESSH) available at http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Environment/environmental-assessment/sea/SEAG

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030

2040 - EESSH2 vision

+/-

+

0

0

+/-

+/-

+

+/-

+

This proposal clarifies the vision for social housing in Scotland, to meet a higher standard of energy efficiency than is required in other residential sectors. This vision gives clarity on the speed and direction of travel required and give clarity on the Scottish Government's commitment to improve the energy efficiency and quality of the social rented sector in Scotland. This vision and end date is expected to result in a continued improvement in the energy efficiency of the social rented sector, and consequential reduction in GHG emissions with secondary benefits for other associated topics through improved human health, air quality, and climatic factors. There is potential for further improvements in air quality associated with the reduction in energy demand from traditional and finite fossil fuel sources.

The setting of standards and dates also supports the development of the supply chain which will be required to support the retrofitting of existing stock. The ability to prioritise refurbishment over demolition will support the continued use of the existing building stock, thus having a positive impact on material assets.

At a local scale, the installation of energy efficiency measures may have impacts associated with nuisance, including noise, dust, and visual. However these are likely to be short term in nature, and can be mitigated with careful use of construction management planning and dialogue with neighbours. They may also have localised visual impacts, which have the potential to have a mixed impact and will require local assessment to ensure use of measures is appropriate for the surroundings.

The installation of energy efficiency measures is recognised as having an impact on some biodiversity, specifically those using roofs and wall cavities as nest sites. Licensing arrangements are already in place to protect these species and act as a deterrent to halt inappropriate actions which would adversely impact these species. As a result it is unlikely that the introduction of new or additional energy efficiency measures would have a significant effect on these species..

The installation of energy efficiency measures may also have a mixed impact on traditional and culturally significant buildings. Other aspects of the setting of the proposal (see below), however provide mitigation through the identification of exemptions to the standard, which will allow targeted measures to be applied on a building by building basis. Installation of energy efficiency measures will still be subject to listing and conversation area controls reducing the likelihood of significant effects. Use will be made of measures appropriate for such buildings drawing on research undertaken by Historic Environment Scotland

Assumptions:

The social rented sector will continue to receive support to allow it to act as an exemplar in residential energy efficiency across Scotland.

Previous SEA work:

SEA of policy on Climate Change Standard for Social Housing (phase 1 of EESSH) available at http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Environment/environmental-assessment/sea/SEAG

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030

Summary of overall effects

There is potential for positive environmental effects. In particular, the setting of a 2032 standard and long term vision for 2040 could contribute to further reductions in GHG emissions ( climatic factors) by improving energy efficiency in the social rented sector across Scotland. The proposal aims to set milestones and end dates for implementation which will, in turn, drive the speed of works required by the standard, thus having a likely beneficial impact ( climatic factors, air, population health). There is potential for further benefits in improving flexibility of supply through energy efficiency measures installed to meet the standard ( material assets, population and health) and reduced reliance on existing fossil fuel energy sources ( climatic factors). The ability to prioritise refurbishment over demolition will support the continued use of the existing building stock, thus having a positive impact on material assets. The accelerated timeline for social housing (in comparison to other tenures) is also likely to have population and health benefits, as it will improve the living conditions of those whose homes are affected.

There is potential for mixed or adverse effects associated with some aspects of the proposal, particularly those associated with development at a local scale. For example, the installation of energy efficiency measures could result in environmental effects, including impacts to biodiversity and air from construction activities and siting of developments, and visual impacts associated with the retrofitting of measures to existing building stock. This is also the case with traditional and culturally significant properties. In the case of the former, specific environmental effects will be considered through the planning process such as Listed Buildings consent, and on a site by site basis, the use of appropriate construction management measures such as Environmental Management Plans. In the case of the latter, the clarity provided regarding exceptions allows suitable mitigation.

Policies and Proposals

Biodiversity

Population and Human Health

Soil

Water

Landscape

Air

Climatic Factors

Cultural heritage

Material Assets

Likely Environmental Effects

Non domestic

A phased increase of regulation so that by 2040 all non-domestic buildings are mandated to reach the standard, where technically feasible and cost effective

+/-

+

0

0

+/-

+/-

+

+/-

+/-

This proposal seeks the setting of a metric by which the energy efficiency of all non-domestic properties in Scotland will be measured and the introduction of regulation to mandate the meeting of that standard as far as is technically feasible and cost effective. It commits the Scottish Government to further work to develop the metric, but clarifies commitment to the need for improvements in energy efficiency across all sectors of buildings.

The proposal gives clarity on the backstop date for compliance and so on the speed of travel.. The setting of standards and dates also supports the development of the supply chain which will be required to support the retrofitting of existing stock. The ability to prioritise refurbishment over demolition will support the continued use of the existing building stock, thus having a positive impact on material assets.

The introduction of a date will result in a gradual improvement in the energy efficiency within the non-domestic sector, and consequential reduction in GHG emissions with secondary benefits for other associated topics through improved human health, air quality, and climatic factors. There is potential for further improvements in air quality associated with the reduction in energy demand from traditional and finite fossil fuel sources.

At a local scale, the installation of energy efficiency measures may have impacts associated with nuisance, including noise, dust, and visual. However these are likely to be short term in nature, and can be mitigated with careful use of construction management planning and dialogue with neighbours. They may also have localised visual impacts, which have the potential to have a mixed impact and will require local assessment to ensure use of measures is appropriate for the surroundings.

The installation of energy efficiency measures is recognised as having an impact on some biodiversity, specifically those using roofs and wall cavities as nest sites. Licensing arrangements are already in place to protect these species and act as a deterrent to halt inappropriate actions which would adversely impact these species. As a result it is unlikely that the introduction of new or additional energy efficiency measures would have a significant effect on these species.

The installation of energy efficiency measures may also have a mixed impact on traditional and culturally significant buildings. Other aspects of the setting of the proposal (see below), however provide mitigation through the identification of exemptions to the standard, which will allow targeted measures to be applied on a building by building basis. Installation of energy efficiency measures will still be subject to listing and conversation area controls reducing the likelihood of significant effects. Use will be made of measures appropriate for such buildings drawing on research undertaken by Historic Environment Scotland. Provisions within regulations and guidance should recognise and respond to give assurance that interventions to buildings in general and particularly those of cultural significance and traditional buildings generally are only specified and undertaken after full consideration of the likely impact on the building

Assumptions:

That a common metric will be found to allow a phased introduction across the non-domestic sector

That further consultation on that metric will be required and that this will be assessed at that time

Previous SEA work:

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030

Non domestic (public sector)

Public sector commercial buildings to be an exemplar with all public sector buildings meeting the benchmark ahead 2040

+/-

+

0

0

+/-

+/-

+

+/-

+/-

This proposal seeks the setting of a metric by which the energy efficiency of all non-domestic properties in Scotland will be measured and the introduction of regulation to mandate the meeting of that standard as far as is technically feasible and cost effective. It commits the Scottish Government to further work to develop the metric, but clarifies commitment to the need for improvements in energy efficiency across all sectors of buildings.

The proposal focuses the Scottish Government's proposal that the public sector act as an exemplar in meeting that standard. It gives clarity on the backstop date for compliance and so on the speed of travel.. The proposal gives clarity on the backstop date for compliance and so on the speed of travel.. The setting of standards and dates also supports the development of the supply chain which will be required to support the retrofitting of existing stock. The ability to prioritise refurbishment over demolition will support the continued use of the existing building stock, thus having a positive impact on material assets.

Acting as an exemplar will result in the speed of implementation within the public sector being accelerated to the rest of the non-domestic sector. This will speed the gradual improvement in the energy efficiency within the publicly owned non-domestic sector, and consequential reduction in GHG emissions with secondary benefits for other associated topics through improved human health, air quality, and climatic factors. There is potential for further improvements in air quality associated with the reduction in energy demand from traditional and finite fossil fuel sources.

At a local scale, the installation of energy efficiency measures may have impacts associated with nuisance, including noise, dust, and visual. However these are likely to be short term in nature, and can be mitigated with careful use of construction management planning and dialogue with neighbours. They may also have localised visual impacts, which have the potential to have a mixed impact and will require local assessment to ensure use of measures is appropriate for the surroundings.

The installation of energy efficiency measures is recognised as having an impact on some biodiversity, specifically those using roofs and wall cavities as nest sites. Licensing arrangements are already in place to protect these species and act as a deterrent to halt inappropriate actions which would adversely impact these species. As a result it is unlikely that the introduction of new or additional energy efficiency measures would have a significant effect on these species.

Similarly, provisions within regulations and guidance should recognise and respond to give assurance that interventions to buildings in general and particularly those of cultural significance and traditional buildings generally are only specified and undertaken after full consideration of the likely impact on the building

The installation of energy efficiency measures may also have a mixed impact on traditional and culturally significant buildings. Other aspects of the setting of the proposal (see below), however provide mitigation through the identification of exemptions to the standard, which will allow targeted measures to be applied on a building by building basis. Installation of energy efficiency measures will still be subject to listing and conversation area controls reducing the likelihood of significant effects. Use will be made of measures appropriate for such buildings drawing on research undertaken by Historic Environment Scotland. Provisions within regulations and guidance should recognise and respond to give assurance that interventions to buildings in general and particularly those of cultural significance and traditional buildings generally are only specified and undertaken after full consideration of the likely impact on the building.

Assumptions:

That a common metric will be found to allow a phased introduction across the non-domestic sector

That further consultation on that metric will be required and that this will be assessed at that time

That the public sector continue to be supported in their efforts to act as an exemplar

Previous SEA work:

Joint SEA of the Draft Climate Change Plan: The Draft Third Report on Policies and Proposals 2017-2032 and Draft Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland available at http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/01/9030

Summary of Overall Effects

There is potential for broadly positive environmental effects. In particular, the setting of a long term standard could contribute to further reductions in GHG emissions ( climatic factors) by improving energy efficiency in the social rented sector across Scotland. The proposal aims to set milestones and end dates for implementation which will, in turn, drive the speed of works required by the standard, thus having a likely beneficial impact ( climatic factors, air, population health). There is potential for further benefits in improving flexibility of supply through energy efficiency measures installed to meet the standard ( material assets, population and health) and reduced reliance on existing fossil fuel energy sources ( climatic factors). ). The ability to prioritise refurbishment over demolition will support the continued use of the existing building stock, thus having a positive impact on material assets. The accelerated timeline for social housing is also likely to have population and health benefits, as it will improve the living conditions of those whose homes are affected.

There is potential for adverse effects associated with some aspects of the proposal, particularly those associated with development at a local scale. For example, the installation of energy efficiency measures could result in environmental effects, including impacts to biodiversity and air from construction activities and siting of developments and visual impacts associated with the retrofitting of measures to existing building stock. Specific environmental effects will be considered through the planning process, Environmental Impact Assessment ( EIA) and Habitats Regulations Appraisal ( HRA) and on a site by site basis, the use of appropriate construction management measures such as Environmental Management Plans.

Similarly, the risk arising from inappropriate interventions in traditional buildings must be assessed and managed as part of measures introduced within the programme to avoid adverse impact on cultural heritage and material assets.

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