Publication - Research and analysis

Domestic Abuse, Housing and Homelessness in Scotland: An Evidence Review

Published: 1 Nov 2010
Part of:
Research
ISBN:
9780755997176

There has been little research on the relationship between domestic abuse, housing and homelessness, especially in the Scottish context. This review provides some secondary analysis of relevant homelessness and housing statistics to provide a more in-depth overview of the scale of domestic abuse as a contributory factor to homelessness in Scotland.

33 page PDF

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33 page PDF

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Contents
Domestic Abuse, Housing and Homelessness in Scotland: An Evidence Review
Footnotes

33 page PDF

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Footnotes

  1. http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/06/17115558/0
  2. Shelter & Scottish Women's Aid (2005) Practitioner article- Domestic abuse and homelessness legislation.
  3. Edgar., B., Williams, N. McMahon, L and McAvoy, S (2003) Sustaining Tenancies Following Domestic Abuse. Joint Centre for Scottish Housing Research. Scottish Women's Aid.
  4. Scottish Women's Aid (2008) Analysis of Local Authority Single Outcome Agreements 2008.
  5. A married woman can apply to the court for an exclusion order if her husband's behaviour has been, or she fear it will be, injurious to her own or her children's physical or mental health. If it has been granted her husband will be given a few days to move out of the home. The exclusion order lasts until the marriage ends by death or divorce, or until it is recalled by the court. If the woman moves house the exclusion order is no longer valid. A cohabiting woman who is sole owner or tenant does not need to apply for an exclusion order, unless her partner has had occupancy rights granted. A cohabiting woman whose partner is the sole owner must apply to court for occupancy rights at the same time as applying for an exclusion order.
  6. Women at risk of violence to themselves or their children can apply for an interdict with a power of arrest attached. Women can get an interdict with a power of arrest if they are married to their abuser; are cohabiting and jointly own or rent their home with their partner; are cohabiting with a partner who is sole owner or tenant and the woman has been granted occupancy rights by the court. An interdict can also be taken out after a woman has left her partner or even while they are still living together, if she doe not want to have him put out of the house or to leave herself. Why would she get an interdict if they were still living together and she doesn't want to put him out of the house?
  7. Shelter & Scottish Women's Aid (2005) Practitioner article- Domestic abuse and homelessness legislation.
  8. Sharp. C., (2008) City of Edinburgh Council Safe As Houses Evaluation as part of Scottish Government Homelessness Prevention Innovation Fund Evaluation. Unpublished report.
  9. Jones, A., Bretherton, J., and Croucher, K. (unpublished at time of writing- draft copy 2009) The effectiveness of schemes to enable households at risk of domestic violence to remain in their own homes. Department of Communities and Local Government- early sight.
  10. Shelter & Scottish Women's Aid (2005) Practitioner article- Domestic abuse and homelessness legislation.
  11. Scottish Government and the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (2009) Prevention of Homelessness Guidance.
  12. Gate keeping has been described as the practice of preventing or discouraging people from making homelessness applications as opposed to preventing homelessness from occurring.
  13. The Edinburgh Safe as Houses Evaluation is discussed on page 19/20.
  14. Scottish Government (2008) Statistical Bulletin: Supporting People Client Statistics 2007-2008.
  15. Ibid.
  16. See Davis, C., (2005) Domestic Violence and housing: summary report. University of Salford. Housing Corporation (2008) Behind Closed Doors. London: Housing Corporation.
  17. Scottish Government (2009) Statistical Bulletin: Crime & Justice Series- Domestic Abuse Recorded by the Police in Scotland, 2008-2009.
  18. Hammer, J., and Itzin, C., and Quiad, S. (2000) Home Truths About Domestic Violence: Feminist Influences and Policy and Practice. A Reader. London. Routledge.
  19. Netto, G. Pawson., H. and Sharp, C (2009) 'Preventing homelessness due to domestic violence: providing a safe space or closing the door to new possibilities?' Social Policy and Administration, Vol. 43, No. 7, pp 719 - 735 (17).
  20. Preventing homelessness due to domestic violence: providing a safe space or closing the door to new possibilities?, IN Social Policy and Administration, Vol 43 No 7 Dec 2009, pp719-735
  21. Jones., A (1998) Out of Sight out of mind: women's homelessness;CRISIS.
  22. Edgar., B., Williams, N., McMahon., L (2003 ) Sustaining Tenancies following Domestic Abuse. Scottish Women's Aid.
  23. See Hutson, S. and Liddiard, M. (1994) Youth Homelessness: The construction of a social issue, London: MacMillan; Smith, J., Gilford, S. and O'Sullivan, A. (1998) The Family Background of Homeless Young People, York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation; Bruegel, I. and Smith, J. (1999) Taking Risks: An analysis of the risks of homelessness for young people in London, London: Safe in the City; Randall,
  24. Quilgars, D., Johnsen, S., Pleace, N., (2008) Youth Homelessness in the UK: A Decade of Progress? Joseph Rowntree Foundation.
  25. Ibid.
  26. Pleace., N., Fiztpatrick., S, and Johnsen (2008) Statutory Homelessness in England: The experiences of families and 16-17 year olds. Communities and Local Government. Base 2,053 adult responses, multiple responses were possible.
  27. The evidence notes that margins of error are too wide with respect to ethnic minority young people survey results to give actual percentages of specific minority groups but the results reported are statistically significant at the 95% confidence level.
  28. Pawson. H.(2001) Repeat Homelessness, Scottish Homes
  29. Shelter Scotland (2002) Repeat Homelessness and Domestic Abuse. Shelter Scotland.
  30. SCORE, (Scottish Continuous Recording System) A dataset funded by the Scottish Government and managed by the Centre for Housing Research ( CHR), monitors new tenancies granted by registered housing associations and co-operatives in Scotland. Monitoring is undertaken by submission of a lettings log for each new tenancy, which is completed by the landlord together with the tenant. The lettings log records details about the tenancy, the tenant household and the property being let.
  31. Scottish Continuous Recording System Data- Analysis of 2007/8 data by Housing Statistics, Scottish Government
  32. Department for Communities and Local Government (2006) Options for setting up a Sanctuary Scheme.
  33. Department for Communities and Local Government (2007) Homelessness Statistics June 2007.
  34. Levison, D. and Kenny, D. (2002) Reducing Domestic Violence….what works? Accommodation Provisions; Home Office.
  35. Netto., G, Pawson., H., Sharp., C (not in print) Preventing homelessness due to domestic violence: providing a safe space or closing the door to new possibilities?
  36. Ibid.
  37. Ibid. page 11.
  38. Sharp. C., (2008) City of Edinburgh Council Safe As Houses Evaluation as part of Scottish Government Homelessness Prevention Innovation Fund Evaluation. Unpublished report.
  39. Ibid.
  40. Fitzpatrick., S., Lynch, E., Goodlad., R with Houghton, C., (2003) Refuges for Women, Children and Young People in Scotland: A Research Report. Scottish Executive.
  41. Communities Analytical Services (2010) Reporting on Progress Towards Equality of Opportunity for Women and Men Made by Public Authorities in Scotland: Ministerial Priorities for Gender Equality: Tackling Violence Against Women: A Review of Key Evidence and National Policies. Scottish Government.
  42. Scottish Women's Aid (2007) Annual Statistics Report 2006-2007.
  43. Fitzpatrick., S., Lynch, E., Goodlad., R with Houghton, C., (2003) Refuges for Women, Children and Young People in Scotland: A Research Report. Scottish Executive.
  44. Levison, D. and Kenny, D. (2002) Reducing Domestic Violence….what works? Accommodation Provisions; Home Office.
  45. Edgar, B., Williams., N., McMahon, L., and McAvoy, S. (2003) Sustaining Tenancies Following Domestic Abuse. University of Dundee.
  46. Ibid.
  47. Ibid.
  48. Ibid.
  49. Mullender, A., Hague, G (2003) Children's Perspective on Domestic Violence. London:Sage.
  50. Ibid.
  51. Ibid.
  52. Fitzpatrick., S., Lynch, E., Goodlad., R with Houghton, C., (2003) Refuges for Women, Children and Young People in Scotland: A Research Report. Scottish Executive.
  53. Ibid.
  54. Mullender, A., Hague, G (2003) Children's Perspective on Domestic Violence. London:Sage.
  55. See Mullender, A., Hague, G (2003) Children's Perspective on Domestic Violence. London:Sage and Fitzpatrick., S., Lynch, E., Goodlad., R with Houghton, C., (2003) Refuges for Women, Children and Young People in Scotland: A Research Report. Scottish Executive.
  56. Mullender, A., Hague, G (2003) Children's Perspective on Domestic Violence. London:Sage.