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Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia: how to spot and report the disease

Advice on what to do if you suspect there is an outbreak of this infectious disease

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Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) affects goats, and rarely can spread to sheep in contact with goats. It can also affect gazelle.

Latest situation: there has never been an outbreak in the UK.

Clinical signs

CCPP can cause breathing difficulties in animals - they sometimes breathe quickly with their mouth open.

Clinical signs can also include:

  • weakness
  • fever
  • loss of appetite
  • cough
  • frothy discharge from the nose
  • producing stringy saliva

How to report

Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia is notifiable. If you suspect signs of any notifiable diseases, you must immediately notify your Scotland: field service local office at the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA). Failure to do so is an offence.

How contagious caprine pleuropneumonia is spread

CCPP is spread between animals in close contact through infected droplets in the breath.

Human health implications

It does not affect humans.

Disease control

If contagious caprine pleuropneumonia is confirmed, the outbreak will be controlled in line with the

contingency framework plan for exotic notifiable diseases.

Legislation

The main legislation relating to the control of CCPP isThe Animal Health (Notification and Control Measures) (Miscellaneous Amendments) (Scotland) Order 2021.

Biosecurity

  • you can help prevent the disease by practicing good biosecurity on your premises.
  • if you import animals into the UK, you should consider if they may be carrying the disease.
  • if you report suspicion of CCPP, the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) vets will investigate.

Find out more about prevention and control by reading the guidance on:

Contact

Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia is notifiable. If you suspect signs of any notifiable diseases, you must immediately notify your Scotland: field service local office at the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA). Failure to do so is an offence.

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