Publication - Research and analysis

Fuel Poverty Strategy for Scotland: consultation analysis

Published: 27 Jun 2018
Directorate:
Housing and Social Justice Directorate
Part of:
Housing
ISBN:
9781788517522

Analysis of written responses to the public consultation exercise on a draft Fuel Poverty Strategy for Scotland.

Fuel Poverty Strategy for Scotland: consultation analysis
Footnotes

Footnotes

1. The Home Energy Efficiency Programmes ( HEEPS) programme will continue to publish annual programme reports on delivery of measures by the programme, and Scotland’s Energy Efficiency Programme ( SEEP) will consider wider reporting requirements going forward. The new Scottish Fuel Poverty Advisory Panel will also provide an annual update to Ministers on the progress of that group.

2. The Scottish Government’s proposed definition of fuel poverty, has been informed by recommendations of an independent panel of experts. The Definition Review Panel’s report, ‘A New Definition of Fuel Poverty in Scotland - A review of recent evidence’, is available online at http://www.gov.scot/Resource/0052/00527017.pdf.

3. The SHCS is designed to produce nationally representative estimates of key statistics annually, and local authority representative estimates by combining data over a three-year period.

4. The remit of the new Scottish Fuel Poverty Advisory Panel requires the group to encourage and foster a partnership approach to tackling fuel poverty across the public, private and third sectors.

5. The assessment tool would be used by frontline workers to assess whether someone is in fuel poverty. It is not designed to be used as part of any cold calling-based approach.

6. One individual submitted two responses. The content of these two responses has been combined for the analysis presented within this report.

7. The Definition Review Panel’s report, ‘A New Definition of Fuel Poverty in Scotland - A review of recent evidence’, is available online at http://www.gov.scot/Resource/0052/00527017.pdf.

8. The Boardman definition agrees that fuel poverty should be considered a unique form of poverty, distinct from other types of poverty, and requiring tailored solutions. It specifies a range of parameters that must be objectively measured and monitored - always in the same way over time - to yield a consistent estimate of fuel poverty prevalence and its broad demography.

9. The 90% figure was recommended by the Definition Review Panel and the rationale for the figure selected is discussed in their report.

10. Available at: http://www.hie.co.uk/regional-information/economic-reports-and-research/archive/a-minimum-income-standard-for-remote-rural-scotland.html

11. Such households have a ‘vulnerable heating regime’ applied which is higher than the standard, reflecting the longer time spent at home. This higher regime results in higher modeled fuel costs. The SHS collects data on income directly from households and therefore should capture lower income levels for such households where they exist.

12 http://gdorb.decc.gov.uk/installers/become-a-green-deal-installer

13. This drop is based on the current definition of fuel poverty.

14. The Regional Networks were set up in 2008 to help Registered Tenant Organisations to engage with the Scottish Government on issues of national policy.

15. The SHCS is designed to produce nationally representative estimates of key statistics annually, and local authority representative estimates by combining data over a three-year period.

16. The SHCS is designed to produce nationally representative estimates of key statistics annually, and local authority representative estimates by combining data over a three-year period.

17. Scotland’s Heat Map can be found at: http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Business-Industry/Energy/Energy-sources/19185/Heat/HeatMap

18. The assessment tool would be used by frontline workers to assess whether someone is in fuel poverty. It is not designed to be used as part of any cold calling-based approach.

19. The Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015 place specific duties on CPPs and their partners at a “locality” level, i.e. smaller areas within a CPP region – some refer to these as LCPPs, others use terms such as “locality partnerships”.

20. SMART is an acronym often used in relation to objective setting and strategic planning. It generally stands for: Specific, Measurable, Achievable; Relevant; Time related.

21. CaCHE is an independent, multi-disciplinary and multi-sector consortium of 13 academic and non-academic partners led by the University of Glasgow. CaCHE is UK-wide in coverage (across all four nations and at different spatial scales within), as well as UK-level in focus. Over the course of the five-year programme it will advance knowledge and improve the evidence base for both housing policy and practice in all parts of the UK.


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