Publication - Research and analysis

Child Poverty Measurement Framework - The Wider Evidence Base

Published: 8 Aug 2014
Part of:
Research
ISBN:
9781784127299

The paper presents the wide range of data collected as part of the process of developing the measurement framework for Scotland’s Child Poverty Strategy presented in the 2014 Annual Report on Child Poverty. Alongside a more detailed analysis of the headline indicators, data is presented from sources considered for inclusion, but not included, in the measurement framework.

25 page PDF

5.8 MB

25 page PDF

5.8 MB

Contents
Child Poverty Measurement Framework - The Wider Evidence Base
Footnotes

25 page PDF

5.8 MB

Footnotes

1. Data Source: Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings. The Living Wage at time of survey (April 2013) was £7.45, and was increased later in 2013 to £7.65

2. Data source: Scottish Government

3. Data source: Scottish Government

4. Data Source: Annual Childcare Costs Survey

5. Data source: Scottish Government

6. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

7. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

8. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

9. Data source: Annual Population Survey

10. Data source: Annual Population Survey

11. Data source: Annual Population Survey

12. Data source: Annual Population Survey

13. Data source: Annual Population Survey

14. Data source: Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings

15. Data source: Annual Population Survey

16. Data source: Annual Population Survey

17. Data source: Annual Population Survey

18. Data source: Scottish Health Survey

19. Data source: Scottish Health Survey

20. Data source: Child Health Systems Programme School System

21. Data source: National Dental Inspection Program

22. The sample was divided into three groups, on the basis of their combined scores for the constituent items of WEMWBS. The three groups are those with 'above average' mental wellbeing (a score of over one standard deviation above the mean score), those with 'average' mental wellbeing (a score within one standard deviation of the mean) and those with 'below average' mental wellbeing (a score of more than one standard deviation below the mean). This three-fold classification has been created solely for the purposes of analysis and is not based on any evidence that an average or below average score is problematic. As a rule, WEMWBS scores are not used as a diagnostic tool.

23. Data source: Scottish Schools Adolescent Lifestyle and Substance Use Survey

24. Data source: Scottish Health Survey

25. Data source: Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

26. Data source: Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

27. Data source: Scottish Health Survey

28. Data source: Scottish Health Survey

29. Data source: Scottish Health Survey

30. Data source: Scottish Health Survey

31. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

32. Data source: Scottish Schools Adolescent Lifestyle and Substance Use Survey

33. Data source: Scottish Health Survey

34. Data source: Scottish Schools Adolescent Lifestyle and Substance Use Survey

35. Data source: Scottish Schools Adolescent Lifestyle and Substance Use Survey

36. Data source: Scottish Health Survey

37. Data source: Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

38. Data source: Scottish Survey of Literacy and Numeracy

39. Data source: Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

40. Data source: Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

41. Data source: Scottish Schools Adolescent Lifestyle and Substance Use Survey

42. The Index of Economic, Social and Cultural Status is constructed from the responses given by students in their background questionnaire and collects information on parental education and occupation, learning resources in the home and access to IT.

43. Data source: Programme of International Student Assessment

44. The Index is set to zero for the mean student across the OECD by background. A score of one is a standard deviation above the mean (roughly one third of the distribution from the mean). A score of minus one is a standard deviation below.

45. Data source: Programme of International Student Assessment

46. Data source: Scottish Survey of Literacy and Numeracy

47. Data source: Scottish Survey of Literacy and Numeracy

48. Data source: Scottish Survey of Literacy and Numeracy

49. Data source: Scottish Health Survey

50. Data source; Scottish Household Survey

51. Data source: Scottish Survey of Literacy and Numeracy

52. Data source: Scottish Survey of Literacy and Numeracy

53. Data source: Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

54. Data source: Family Resources Survey

55. Data source: Scottish House Conditions Survey

56. Data source: Scottish Government administrative data

57. Data source: Scottish House Conditions Survey

58. Data source: Scottish House Conditions Survey

59. Data source: Scottish House Conditions Survey

60. Data source: Scottish House Conditions Survey

61. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

62. Data source: Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study. It should be noted that postcode information required for SIMD is not available for 26% of survey respondents. Findings presented are for the remaining individuals only.

63. Data source: Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

64. Data source: Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

65. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

66. Data source: Scottish Crime and Justice Survey

67. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

68. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

69. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

70. Data source: Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

71. Data source: Scottish Crime and Justice Survey

72. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

73. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

74. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

75. Data source: Scottish Household Survey

76. Data source: Annual Population Survey

77. Data source: Annual Population Survey

78. Data source: Annual Population Survey

79. Data source: Scottish Household Survey


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