Publication - Strategy/plan

Caring Together: The Carers Strategy for Scotland 2010 - 2015

Published: 26 Jul 2010
Part of:
Health and social care
ISBN:
9780755997138

The Scottish Government and COSLA are determined to ensure that carers are supported to manage their caring responsibilities with confidence and in good health, and to have a life of their own outside of caring.

Contents
Caring Together: The Carers Strategy for Scotland 2010 - 2015
APPENDIX 3 PROFILE OF YOUNG CARERS

APPENDIX 3 PROFILE OF YOUNG CARERS

Census 2001

The following table breaks down the number of young carers according to their age and the reported numbers of hours care they were providing each week.

Age

1-19 hours

20-49 hours

50 or more

Total Number

Total %

5-7

626

77

103

806

4.8%

8-9

963

108

134

1205

7.2%

10-11

1,702

176

166

2044

12.2%

12-14

4,191

405

349

4945

29.6%

15

1,800

271

148

2219

13.2%

16-17

4,229

789

464

5482

32.8%

All

13, 511

1,826

1,364

16,701

100%

All as %

80%

11%

8%

100%

The 2001 Census provides further information on the numbers of young adult carers aged 18-25 years in Scotland.

Numbers of older young carers aged 18-25 years in Scotland

Caring for 0-19 hours Caring for 20-49 hours Caring for 50 + hours Total number caring Proportion of this age group providing informal care

15,417

3,203

2,495

21,115

5%

Other Sources

1. In 2002, an audit of schools in Highland found that at least 10% of children and young people identified themselves as carers, after receiving a class lesson about young carers. The figure rose to 15% when those young people who thought they might be young carers, but weren't sure, were added. Applying the lower figure to the population of school age children in Scotland suggests that over 80,000 children and young people could be young carers in Scotland.

2. A study of hidden young carers in rural Perth and Kinross found that 13.5% of the school age population identified themselves as young carers. Using this percentage figure would indicate a national figure of over 115,000 young carers.

3. In 2009, secondary school pupils in Renfrewshire were surveyed about their health and well-being. Of the 5557 who replied, 1250 reported that they were living in the same household as someone affected by disability, illness, or substance misuse issues. 3 in 5 of these pupils said that they were carers. This again equates to 13.5% of those surveyed.

4. Glasgow's Joint Young Carers Strategy (2002-2005) refers to research carried out by the Greater Glasgow NHS Board in 2000. This "Youth Health Survey" received returns from 2,600 young people aged 12-15 years, of whom 11.1% were found to be young carers.

"Young Carers in the UK; the 2004 Report" Summary

General

56% Girls, 44% Boys
Average age 12
56% in lone parent families
84% white
10% caring for more than one person

Duration of Caring

36%

- caring for 2 years or less

44%

- caring for 3-5 years

18%

- caring for 6-10 years

3%

- caring for more than 10 years

Age of Young Carers

0-4

0

5-7

4%

8-9

5%

10-11

11%

12-14

31%

15

14%

16-17

35%

Intensity of caring

5 hours

15%

6-10 hours

34%

11-15 hours

17%

16-20 hours

16%

21-30 hours

10%

31-40 hours

4%

Over 40 hours

4%

Caring for Whom

50% of cared for have a physical disability
29% of cared-for have a mental health problem
17% of cared-for have a learning disability (sibling care)
3% of cared-for have a sensory impairment

In 52% of cases, caring for mother or step-mother (70% in one parent families).
In 14% of cases, caring for a father or step-father
In 31% of cases, caring for a sibling (63% with learning disability).

Types of Caring

Domestic Tasks (68%) - shopping, cooking, cleaning, ironing

General Care (48%) - medication, mobility, transfers, changing dressings

Emotional Support (82%) - responding to mood, supporting, supervision

Intimate Care (18%) - washing, dressing, personal care, toileting

Child Care (11%) - caring for siblings

Other (7%) - translating, administration, hospital visits, paying bills

Gender Issues

Overall, girls are more involved in all aspects of caring. This is more marked in respect of domestic and intimate care, both of which have traditionally fallen to women. 75% of girls, but only 65% of boys, provide domestic care, while 22% of girls and 13% of boys provide personal, intimate care.