Information

Increasing residential rehabilitation capacity

Fund reopens for applications.

Organisations who support people with problem drug use are being invited to apply for funding to expand their residential rehabilitation provision.

The Residential Rehabilitation Rapid Capacity Programme fund (RRRCP) is part of the additional £100 million announced as part of the National Mission to improve access to residential rehabilitation, trebling the number of publicly funded places by 2026.

Applications for this latest round of funding will close on 9 January 2023 with priority given to projects increasing services in areas where residential rehabilitation provision is lower so people can access treatment regardless of where they live.

Phoenix Futures was supported by the RRRCP to develop their National Families Service, Harper House in Saltcoats which was opened by the First Minister on 21 November.

Minister for Drugs Policy Angela Constance said:

“I have always said I want every penny of the additional funds announced as part of the National Mission to make a difference and this fund is already having a positive impact on the lives of people with problem drug use.

“The opening of the Harper House - which can support to up to 20 families at a time - and the recent expansion of detox and rehab services at the Lothian and Edinburgh Abstinence Programme (LEAP) are just a couple of examples of how this money is being used to increase the options available to people who want help.

“While there is much to be done to address our drug deaths crisis these projects show we are making changes to support people to access the treatment and recovery that is right for them.”

BACKGROUND

The Scottish Government has committed to increase the number of publicly funded residential rehabilitation placements by 300% and the number of beds by 50% by 2026

National drugs mission funds: guidance - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)

Residential Rehabilitation Rapid Capacity Programme: guidance - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)

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