Publication - Consultation paper

Police priorities consultation: easy read version

Published: 20 Aug 2019
Directorate:
Justice Directorate
Part of:
Law and order
ISBN:
9781839600753

Consultation paper seeking views on revised strategic police priorities, relating to the policing of Scotland and the Scottish Police Authority's functions.

Contents
Police priorities consultation: easy read version
Strategic Police Priorities for Scotland - Consultation - Easy Read

Strategic Police Priorities for Scotland - Consultation - Easy Read

What is this Consultation about?

A hand holding a document with ‘The Law’ printed on the cover. Beside this, a woman is holding a clipboard and asking questions to a large, diverse group of people.

The law says that the Scottish Government has to ask the people their views before important changes are made.

When the Scottish Government asks people for their views it is called a Consultation.

The Scottish Government has done a review of the most important goals for policing in Scotland. These are called the priorities.

A calendar with the 4th of October circled.

The Scottish Government would like your views on the new Strategic Police Priorities for Scotland.

The responses should be handed in by the 4th October 2019.

Overview

Police Scotland logo.

In 2013, the Police, the Scottish Police Services Authority and the Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency came together to create Police Scotland.

A woman Police officer standing in front of a diverse group of people, in a local setting. All are smiling and happy.

Police Scotland is the police service in Scotland. The Chief Constable is responsible for this and should always try and make policing in Scotland better. They make sure there are police in local areas. The Chief Constable answers to the Scottish Police Authority (SPA).

A man in a suit with a name badge, pointing at a map of Scotland.

The Scottish Police Authority (SPA) maintains a high level of policing and tries to make policing better in Scotland. It makes sure that Scottish Ministers and the police are separate.

Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary in Scotland (HMICS) carry out inspections on the work of Police Scotland and the SPA.

A male Police officer pointing at a board with a flow-chart on it and the heading ‘The Plan’.

Police Investigations and Review Commissioner (PIRC) looks at how complaints that have been made by the public are handled. They also investigate serious complaints that are made about the police.

In 2017 the SPA and Police Scotland made a plan on how they would meet the needs of communities. This is a plan for policing over a ten year period, and includes how changes in communities will be met. Police Scotland has reported on its improvements toward equality.

A map of Scotland with a piece of paper in front of it with the heading, “National Performance Framework’. There is a checklist on the piece of paper and a hand is ticking off all the items with a pen.

Police Priorities and Planning

The National Performance Framework (NPF) is a plan for all of Scotland. It aims to:

  • Create a more successful country
  • Give opportunities to all people
  • Increase the well-being of people
  • Help the economy to grow
  • Make the country more equal for everyone

A handshake between two officials.

To help deliver this the NPF includes 'National Outcomes'. These outcomes state the kind of Scotland the NPF wants to create.

To make this happen the National Performance Framework wants local government, public services, business, voluntary organisations and people living in Scotland to work together.

Two Police officers, one male one female, talking to an elderly woman and a young man in a community setting. All are smiling and happy.

Policing helps to meet two National Outcomes. These focus on helping people to live in safe communities, and protecting human rights and tackling discrimination.

The law says that 'the main purpose of policing is to improve the safety and well-being of persons, localities and communities in Scotland'. The Police Service should try to make this happen in a way which is accessible and engaged with local communities. It should promote ways to prevent crime, harm and disorder.

A piece of paper with the heading ‘Strategic Police Plan’. There is a checklist on the piece of paper and a hand is ticking off all the items with a pen.

The law says there has to be a Strategic Police Plan in place, and it should fit with the Strategic Police Priorities. At the moment the main areas of the plan are:

1. Protection

2. Prevention

3. Communities

4. Knowledge

5. Innovation

The Strategic Police Plan is being changed during 2019/20, and is due to be published in 2020.

A hand holding a document with ‘New Plan 2020’ printed on the cover.

A woman Police officer standing in front of a diverse group of people, in a local setting. All are smiling and happy

The Chief Constable must prepare a yearly Police Plan, which must fit with the bigger Strategic Police Plan. This year’s Plan includes the following priorities:

  • Protecting vulnerable people
  • Tackling computer-related crime
  • Working with communities
  • Support for police work

This Plan also includes outcomes, which describe the difference Police Scotland will make.

Local Police make Local Police Plans. They discuss this with local organisations and councils to make the plans work.

New Strategic Police Priorities

To make the draft new Strategic Police Priorities in this consultation paper, we have spoken to a number of different organisations that have a direct interest in policing in Scotland. This has included: The Scottish Police Authority, Police Scotland and local councils.

Key areas that were spoken about were:

  • The importance of an open and clear way to manage policing
  • Making sure the plans show the importance and value of the workforce
  • Finding out what is needed to help plan and deliver the service
  • Tackling crime should remain the priority for the service
  • Being as clear as possible about the role of the police service
  • The need for ongoing local policing
  • The importance of developing the service so we are spending our money in the correct way.

A woman is holding a clipboard and asking questions to a large, diverse group of people.

The consultation will give us a chance to discuss and meet with interested groups on the development of the Police Priorities.

New Strategic Police Priorities

Two Police officers, one male one female, talking to an elderly woman and a young man in a community setting. All are smiling and happy.

We think the new Strategic Police Priorities should be:

Crime and Security - Focus on prevention and investigation to tackle crime. Maintain public order.

Confidence - Keep the public trust by being open and honest, and by showing that plans are being delivered.

Partnerships - Work with other groups to make communities safe. This will make people feel stronger and less vulnerable.

Sustainability - Make changes to meet the country’s and people’s needs, making sure there is no negative environmental impact.

People – Employ, support and empower a diverse workforce to deliver a high quality service.

Evidence - Use evidence to make the service better, and to make sure the right resources and workforce are in place.

A diverse group of Police officers.

How long will these be the Strategic Police Priorities?

Two calendars, one with ‘3 years’ written on it and the other with ‘6 years’ written on it. There is a question mark on top of them.

The law does not say when these should be looked at again.

We think the new Strategic Police Priorities should be for 6 years rather than for 3, which has previously been the case. It will provide a longer time period for the priorities to be delivered and to measure progress. It will allow us to have stronger evidence to set future priorities.

Consultation questions

1. Are the new Strategic Police Priorities the right ones for the future?

Yes / No

Comments

2. Do the new Strategic Police Priorities meet your needs?

Yes / No

Comments

3. Do the new Strategic Police Priorities meet the needs of your community?

Yes / No

Comments

4. Should the new Strategic Police Priorities be in place for 6 years?

Yes / No

Comments

5. How do you think delivery of the Strategic Police Priorities should be measured?

Comments

6. Do you have any comments on whether the new Strategic Police Priorities will affected people equally?

Comments

How to respond to the Consultation

Please give us your answers to the consultation questions by 4 October 2019.

You can give your answers online by going to: https://consult.gov.scot/safer-communities/review-of-strategic-police-priorities

If you can’t or don’t want to give your answers online, please complete the Respondent Information Form and return with the completed consultation to:

Police Division (Strategic Police Priorities)

Scottish Government

1R

St Andrew’s House

Edinburgh

EH1 3DG


Contact

Email: StrategicPolicePriorities@gov.scot