Information

Marine Scotland Inshore Protection Programme statistics: FOI release

Information request and response under the Freedom of Information (Scotland) Act 2002


Information requested

1. What is the yearly cost for operating the inshore protection programme (IPP) in the Clyde, and a breakdown of them?
2. How many boardings were undertaken by the IPP since it started?
3. How many offences were detected by the IPP and what was the outcome of each, since it started?
4. How many sea days has the IPP been on patrol?

Response

The information that you have requested is contained in the annex to this letter.

ANNEX

The Inshore Protection Programme (IPP) started in November 2019. Much of the work undertaken by the IPP has to be seen in the context of Covid19 where it has had to adhere to our Covid19 response plans and physical distancing limitations. This has the effect of curtailing certain levels of interaction with fishing masters, in particular on small vessels where physical distancing is not possible. I have included more information than you have requested as it is important to consider the information in this context.

The IPP is based on the Clyde and therefore its tasking is predominantly in that area. Crucially, since the IPP started operating, the number of reports from local groups and individuals regarding suspected illegal fishing in the South Arran Marine Protected Area has declined by over 50% as shown in a recently released Freedom of Information request.

1. What is the yearly cost for operating the inshore protection programme(IPP) in the Clyde, and a breakdown of them?

Staff £308,929
Running costs £163,787

This is the cost of the overall Inshore Protection Programme in Largs. This consists of two teams of three operating 'back to back' but with changes to crewing rotations some 10 officers over the course of the year have been involved. These figures include salaries; allowances; accommodation and all other costs associated with the safe operation of the programme and maintenance of the inshore crafts used.

2. How many boardings were undertaken by the IPP since it started?

There have been 27 Article 76 inspections at sea. These are inspections in line with Article 76 of the Control Regulation EU 1224/2009 which can be found here:
https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32009R1224&from=EN.
More broadly, there have been 601 sightings and other contact with industry at sea.

3. How many offences were detected by the IPP and what was the outcome of each, since it started?

There have also been five occasions where illegal gear has been seized by the IPP and recovered to safe storage. Due to the gear being unmarked there is no suspect identified in four of these cases. However, in the fifth the master was identified and interviewed under caution on suspicion of breaching a Marine Conservation Order. There have been a further two occasions where gear was illegally set and its removal ordered and supervised by officers of the IPP. There has also been intelligence gathered around engine power issues regarding a vessel and an advisory letter issued to the master.

4. How many sea days has the IPP been on patrol?

The IPP has completed 315 days on patrol at sea, out of 365 days of the year, which is 86% at sea. When weather conditions or other factors make a sea patrol impractical then the IPP crew have generally been on land based coastal patrol or undertaking other enforcement duties.

About FOI
The Scottish Government is committed to publishing all information released in response to Freedom of Information requests.
View all FOI responses at http://www.gov.scot/foi-responses.

Contact

Please quote the FOI reference
Central Enquiry Unit
Email: ceu@gov.scot
Phone: 0300 244 4000

The Scottish Government
St Andrews House
Regent Road
Edinburgh
EH1 3DG

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