Publication - Research and analysis

CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE'S VIEWS ON CHILD PROTECTION SYSTEMS IN SCOTLAND

Published: 8 Jul 2013
Part of:
Health and social care
ISBN:
9781782567356

1.1 This review considers the views and experiences of children and young people on child protection systems in Scotland. It aims to inform service delivery, communications on child protection and future potential ways to engage children and young people on this issue. The findings of this review will form the basis for future research on gathering the views of children and young people on child protection systems in Scotland.

61 page PDF

609.0 kB

61 page PDF

609.0 kB

Contents
CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE'S VIEWS ON CHILD PROTECTION SYSTEMS IN SCOTLAND
Contents

61 page PDF

609.0 kB

ISBN 978 1 78256 735 6 (web only publication)
ISSN 2045-6964
DPPAS 14465

This document is also available in pdf format (594KB)

Contents

Acknowledgements

1 Executive Summary
Introduction
Evidence on child protection
Child protection systems
Gaps in evidence
Recommendations for moving forward
Conclusion

2 Introduction and Research Aims
Background
Context for child protection
Review aims
Methodology for review
Reflections on methodology
Notes on the review

3 Evidence on Child Protection
Introduction
Children's Hearings System
Advocacy
Confidentiality and privacy
Online child protection issues
Residential care
Secure Care
Foster care
Looked after at home
Kinship care
Leaving care
Role of parents and families
Role of adults
Physical punishment
Young carers
Domestic abuse
Household substance misuse
Child contact disputes in court
Children and young people with a parent in prison
Running away from home and homelessness
Child sexual exploitation
Child trafficking
Mental health and wellbeing
Bullying
Drug misuse
Alcohol
Sexual Health
Summary

4 Evidence on Child Protection Systems
Introduction
Consultations with children and young people on child protection processes
Approaches to supporting participation
Evidence on child protection systems from the rest of the UK
Summary

5 Conclusions
Introduction
Findings
Gaps in evidence
Reflections on the evidence
Recommendations for future research
Conclusion

6 Endnotes and references
Endnotes
References


Contact

Email: Donna McLean